Trump

J. Tyler Franklin - WFPL

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Attorneys for President Donald Trump say he did nothing wrong as a candidate when protesters said they were roughed up by his supporters at a campaign rally in Louisville last year.

 

Trump's team responded Friday to their lawsuit in federal court, saying the protesters waived their right to sue by buying tickets to the event. Trump's response also says he's immune as president from such suits.

Trump's team also denies that he was urging the crowd to take action against the protesters when he repeatedly said "get them out of here."

Kentucky Humanities Council

President Trump’s proposed federal budget includes a plan to zero-out funding for the National Endowments for the Arts and Humanities, and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.


On this week’s Eastern Standard, we’ll discuss what such cuts could mean for Kentucky.

Kentucky U.S. Senator Rand Paul is not happy with the current Republican plan to replace the Affordable Care Act, otherwise known as Obamacare. The plan comes from House Speaker Paul Ryan and has the support of President Donald Trump.

Miners' Message To Trump: Protect Benefits

Mar 20, 2017

President Donald Trump’s campaign-style rally in Louisville got the attention of some retired coal miners in the region. They’re particularly worried about being able to afford health insurance on a new plan.

President Trump To Hold Rally In Louisville Next Week

Mar 13, 2017

President Donald Trump will hold a rally in Louisville next Monday. The announcement comes days after Vice President Mike Pence visited the city as he promoted the plan to repeal and replace Obamacare.

The White House has been putting pressure on conservative lawmakers like U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, who oppose the repeal and replace plan.

Notice of the event was sent out by Trump’s campaign committee, not the White House. The rally will be the third campaign-style event Trump has held since his inauguration on Jan. 20.

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — Duard Rutledge voted for Donald Trump and Rand Paul for the same reason: They’re not afraid of a fight.

That’s why the 66-year-old retired Toyota worker wasn’t worried to see Kentucky’s junior senator getting in the way of the Republican plan to replace Obama’s health care law.

“When you get two thoroughbreds, they are high strung,” he said. “But if you get them headed the right way they can both win the race.”

President Trump has signed a revised executive order, once again barring travel to the United States from six majority-Muslim countries and suspending the U.S. refugee program.

It’s similar to the president’s January order that was blocked by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. But this latest order leaves Iraq off the list of barred countries. The White House cites more cooperation with the Iraqi government in vetting people who apply for U.S. visas.

Democrats have tapped former Gov. Steve Beshear to deliver the party’s response to President Donald Trump’s address to a joint session of Congress Tuesday night, highlighting the Kentucky Democrat’s efforts to expand health care coverage under the law Republicans are determined to repeal and replace.

This note came from Jordan, writing, “Morning!  I've listened to WEKU every morning on my commute for the last several years - you guys are awesome!  One small comment, though.  Every morning when Bryan Bartlett gives the time it is one minute fast when compared to the atomic clock in Boulder, CO, which is the United States' primary time and frequency standard.  http://www.time.gov/” 

Kentucky.com

 Veteran economist Chris Bollinger predicted 2.2 percent  economic growth across Kentucky in 2017

 Veteran economist Chris Bollinger predicted a 2.2. percent economic growth across Kentucky in 2017 Tuesday

Bollinger, director of the University of Kentucky Center for Business and Economic Research said much of the employment gains will be seen in health and service jobs. Bollinger said there are lots options when it comes to economic advances in the state’s rural communities. He spoke at the UK Economic Outlook Conference.


Marisa Hempel

The new president’s executive order limiting travel from seven Middle Eastern and African countries has kept immigration on our minds these past couple of weeks.


On this week’s EST, we’ll discuss immigration in the Commonwealth.

 

 

Kentucky.com

Just a day after President Donald Trump’s announcement of a nominee for the Supreme Court, Chief Justice John Roberts visited Lexington. 

Justice John Roberts, America’s 17th chief justice, sat down at the University of Kentucky for a talk with John Duff, Director of the Administrative Office of the United States Courts.


Stu Johnson/WEKU

President Donald Trump’s action to temporarily ban refugees and other immigrants from seven Muslim-majority countries continues to prompt public response.

Piano music greeted those who filled Christ Church Cathedral Tuesday night, creating the feel more of a unifying rally than a protest.  But Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes elicited a strong response urging attendees to denounce hate and fear.


Days after President Donald Trump’s executive order relating to immigration and refugees, Kentucky’s elected officials are mostly silent on the issue.

Gov. Matt Bevin, Rep. Hal Rogers, Rep. Andy Barr, Rep. Thomas Massie, Rep. Brett Guthrie and Rep. James Comer haven’t responded to repeated requests for comment.

Kentucky.com

Following a weekend of reactions to President Donald Trump’s executive order limiting immigration into the U.S, Lexington’s mayor says the city will continue welcoming those who come into the community. 
 

Mayor Jim Gray reacted to the nationwide and international controversy in a series of tweets, beginning with the comment that (quote) “The President's actions have created unnecessary anxiety and unrest.His poorly developed plan divides the American people.”

STEPHANIE KEITH/GETTY IMAGES

An executive order issued Friday banning refugees and limiting immigration from several Muslim-majority countries set off a flurry of protests and court filings over the weekend.

Kentuckians were among the hundreds of thousands of people who traveled to Washington D.C. this weekend. Some attended President Donald Trump’s inauguration on Friday and others were there for the Women’s March on Washington on Saturday, protesting Trump’s attitudes toward women and minorities.

As the first weekend of the new administration is in the books, I checked in with a couple Kentuckians who traveled to the events for very different reasons.

Listen to the audio in the player above.

Kentucky Department of Agriculture

State agriculture officials believe President Donald J. Trump’s pick to serve as United State Secretary of Agriculture will benefit Kentucky farmers.  The new president selected former Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue to head the federal agency.

Cheri Lawson

Thousands of women, men and children gathered for a rally and march in Lexington Saturday.  As WEKU’s Cheri Lawson reports, the afternoon event coincided with the national Women’s March on Washington.

Trump's EPA Pick Questioned In Confirmation Hearing

Jan 19, 2017
West Virginia Public Broadcasting/Associated Press

President-elect Donald Trump’s choice to lead the Environmental Protection Agency, Scott Pruitt faced questions from Senators in his confirmation hearing Wednesday. 


Kentucky.com

Almost 300 members of the Kentucky National Guard  will support Washington, D.C. law enforcement during this weeks' 58th presidential inauguration. 


A small group representing the Hispanic community brought their concerns about bullying and the potential for deportation under the administration of Donald J. Trump before the Fayette County School Board Monday.


Roger McGraw/WOUB

During the presidential campaign I visited two regional manufacturing executives who do business in the same county but hold views on trade that are worlds apart. Now that Donald Trump is the president-elect, I asked them and some regional economists how the new administration’s approach to trade might affect the Ohio Valley region.

Laura Elizabeth Pohl/Bread for the World

On Nelson Key Road in Murray, Kentucky, lies a 30-acre tobacco farm and there sits the road’s namesake, Nelson Key himself. He’s just at the end of this year’s harvest, which was brought in with the help of migrant workers.

 

“I used American workers up until 1991 then I went to the migrant workers and I’ve had them ever since,” he explained.

Here’s an email from Chris, in Berea, “One morning last week, you shared a tweet from Donald Trump as if it were news regarding how he had helped a Ford plant not leave Louisville.   Trump’s tweet, however, was quickly shown to be incorrect."   


Jeff Young/Ohio Valley ReSource

The opioid epidemic is on the agenda for political campaigns from the presidential race down to the local level in the Ohio Valley region. Election Day could shape the response to the crisis in states with some of the nation’s highest rates of addiction and overdoses.


J. Tyler Franklin / WFPL

Donald Trump will likely win big in Kentucky on November 8.

The FiveThirtyEight poll aggregator predicts the Republican nominee has a 99.6 percent chance of winning Kentucky’s eight electoral votes.

But what’s still unclear is how his popularity will affect the down ballot, especially in races for the hotly-contested state House of Representatives. Republicans are trying to win a majority in that chamber for the first time in nearly a century.

The Values Behind Your Vote on Eastern Standard

Oct 31, 2016
Marisa Hempel

Have you made up your mind about your vote for the Presidency, the US Senate seat and your representative to the U.S. House?  What about state legislators and county and local races.

On this week’s Eastern Standard, Why are you voting the way you are voting?

 


 

 

Via the WEKU Facebook page, Marcia wrote to us, “Sick of hearing about Trump. There are other candidates who deserve coverage.” 

We had an exchange of messages with Marcia, explaining that WEKU does not determine the coverage, or extent of it, within the national news shows such as Here and Now, Morning Edition and All Things Considered but that we will certainly make sure her concerns are shared with producers of those shows.