pride

Rainbow Crosswalks Will Stay, For Now

Dec 1, 2017
Kentucky.com

The future of Lexington’s vibrant rainbow crosswalks has been cloudy because of safety concerns. But city officials are looking into those claims.

The crosswalks added this summer were created to honor the LGBTQ community during Lexington's annual Pride Festival.

 


Stu Johnson

An official with the federal government wants the mayor of Lexington to remove a rainbow-colored crosswalk, saying the agency is concerned that the crossing is a safety hazard.


John Hingsbergen

The city of Georgetown held its second annual LGBTQ Pride over the weekend. The Saturday event went smoothly despite challenging weather and an apparent threat against a lesbian couple in the community of about 33,000.          


John Hingsbergen

Kentucky’s Capital City hosted its first-ever LGBTQ Pride festival this past weekend. Organizers and Frankfort city officials say the event exceeded their expectations.  


Zach Redding

October is apparently becoming the second month of LGBTQ Pride, at least in our area.  Some towns in Central Kentucky are joining in, some for the very first time.

We'll discuss the purpose and goals of these community events with guests: Harold Dean Jessie, of Georgetown; Jesse Ruble of Frankfort and Dr. Patricia Minter, professor at Western Kentucky University.


John Hingsbergen

Attendance for Lexington’s Tenth Annual Pride Festival exceeded expectations.  Organizers of Saturday’s event are estimating a crowd of about 30,000 compared to last year’s 25,000.


Andrea Noall Herald-Leader staff

It’s time for our weekly chat featuring arts and cultural activities with Rich Copley and Harriett Hendren of the Lexington Herald-Leader.

Among the events on their minds are Saturday’s Lexington Pride Festival as well as Paint the Town.  


John Hingsbergen

A crowd estimated at about 1000 gathered in Lexington Sunday for the community’s first LGBTQ Pride Rally and March.

Organizers say the event on the downtown Courthouse Square was planned in “solidarity” with a national rally in Washington, D.C.   


kentucky.com

The Kentucky Court of Appeals has ruled a Lexington business did not discriminate when it refused to print T-shirts for a gay pride festival.  A decision about whether to appeal Friday’s ruling to a higher court could come in just a few days.

The case involves the business Hands On Originals’ decision not to print the T-shirts for Lexington’s 2012 Pride Festival.  Store Managing Owner Blaine Adamson said in a teleconference Friday,“religious liberty is our most important freedom," adding, "It's not really free if beliefs are confined to our minds.”

Thousands turned out in downtown Lexington over the weekend for Pride 2016.  Organizers of the LGBT-focused event were predicting crowds larger than last year’s total of about 25,000.

This year’s Pride included a moment of remembrance for victims of the massacre at a gay club in Orlando led by Pastor Marsha Moors-Charles of Lexington’s Bluegrass United Church of Christ.

MMC: “Although we may not know all the names on this beautiful flag that will be sent to Orlando, God indeed knows their names and welcomed them into their eternal home.”

Transgender Issues on Eastern Standard

Jun 22, 2016
Marisa Hempel

Lexington's Annual Pride celebration is this weekend, happening on the tail of devastating news such as the mass shooting in Orlando. In the midst of all the discussions involving LGBT issues, Eastern Standard will focus on the oft-forgotten T: Transgender rights and issues. Kentucky recently joined the lawsuit with other states over the controversial matter at hand of Transgender restrooms.