panhandling

Downtown Development Corporation

Lexington’s Urban County Council is considering a new ordinance that would forbid people from walking in the medians of major streets or approaching cars at intersections.  That proposal comes after a February state Supreme Court decision that overturned the city’s ban on panhandling, saying it violated free speech protections.

Capitol reporter Ryland Barton tells us supporters of the proposal say it’s all about protecting pedestrians and motorists.  


Marisa Hempel

Have you noticed panhandlers at interstate exits and street corners?  Maybe in downtown Lexington or other communities?

 


After the State Supreme court ruling that struck down Lexington’s panhandling ordinance, the issue has had officials scrambling to find answers to this community problem, with meetings to address the issue taking place all month long.

On this week’s Eastern Standard: Panhandling in the Commonwealth.

 

 

 

Stu Johnson

Lexington city officials along with a non-profit agency serving homeless people are implementing new strategies to reduce street corner panhandling.  The launch of a new job centered service was unveiled Tuesday.

Lexington City Leaders Discuss Panhandling

Apr 19, 2017
wkyt.com

Panhandling in Lexington received a thorough discussion Tuesday at City Hall.  Mayor Jim Gray says he’s held three meetings on the issue over the last week and a half.

The mayor says he gathered a task force of sorts and recommendations will be coming to council.  One member, Fred Brown says his wife was harassed in a parking lot. “They’re not only holding signs up now. They’re approaching the vehicles and knocking on the windows,” said Brown.

Marisa Hempel

Kentucky’s Supreme Court struck down Lexington’s panhandling ordinance last week, saying the ban violated free speech. While the homeless in Lexington can now panhandle without fear of prosecution, there are other issues of concern related to basic subsistence.


On this week’s Eastern Standard, homelessness in the Commonwealth.