Martin Luther King

File Photo Lexington HERALD-LEADER

Sen. Gerald Neal knew he was part of something historic when, as a freshman at Kentucky State University, he joined a mass of 10,000 who marched peacefully on the Capitol with the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and other civil rights leaders 50 years ago today.

Some of the excitement he felt that day — “We thought we were on the path of eliminating racism in society, bigotry,” he said — has resurfaced as organizers recognize the Freedom March on Frankfort.

Stu Johnson

Downtown Lexington is usually an active place on Martin Luther King Day.  And so it was this 20th day of 2014.  But, some participants in this year's annual march say more work is needed to further the efforts of the slain civil rights leader.  While special Martin Luther King festivities occur at places like the children’s museum and historic Kentucky Theater, the march through downtown remains the city's highest profile event.  


King Day March, Discussion at UK Focus on Pacifism

Jan 20, 2014
Matt Goins - Lexington Herald Leader

University of Kentucky students and staff honored the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s pacifism on Sunday with a candle-lit march past a half-dozen silently re-enacted scenes of violence, including King's 1968 assassination; the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks; and the 2012 elementary school shooting in Newtown, Conn.

A special edition of Kentucky Tonight features Bill Goodman and Renee Shaw examining the causes and possible solutions of poverty in Kentucky.   The program which airs Monday night on Kentucky Educational Television, will be re-broadcast Tuesday morning at 11:00 on the WEKU Stations.