lawsuit

Courtesy WFPL.

When health care and law enforcement officials met recently at a health policy forum in Lexington, Kentucky, to share ideas about the opioid crisis, Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear listed some groups that have benefited from money won in a 2015 settlement with Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin.

J. Tyler Franklin - WFPL

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Attorneys for President Donald Trump say he did nothing wrong as a candidate when protesters said they were roughed up by his supporters at a campaign rally in Louisville last year.

 

Trump's team responded Friday to their lawsuit in federal court, saying the protesters waived their right to sue by buying tickets to the event. Trump's response also says he's immune as president from such suits.

Trump's team also denies that he was urging the crowd to take action against the protesters when he repeatedly said "get them out of here."

University of Kentucky

 

A judge has ruled against the University of Kentucky student newspaper in an Open Records case regarding a sexual harassment investigation.  

Fayette Circuit Judge Thomas Clark ruled the Kentucky Kernel does not have the right to review documents in the case involving a former UK professor. 

Ky. Attorney General Sues Bevin Over Education Cuts

Apr 11, 2016
kentucky.com

Kentucky’s Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear announced on Monday he has filed suit against Republican Gov. Matt Bevin over the governor’s recent order imposing an immediate 4.5 percent funding cut to state colleges and universities.

The cut amounts to some $41 million in spending reductions from what the General Assembly had agreed to in a previous budget.

Beshear said Bevin’s current-year cuts to higher education violate the separation of powers between the three branches of government and are unconstitutional.

Kentucky Education Reform: 25 Years Later

Apr 10, 2015
enquirer.com

Education advocates say Kentucky still suffers from inadequate education funding 25 years after the legislature passed sweeping reforms.

The Kentucky Education Reform Act was signed into law 25 years ago this week and served as a model for national reforms. It included a $1.3 billion tax increase, gave parents a say in hiring principals and launched a daring, first-of-its kind accountability system for teachers based on how much children were learning.