kentucky supreme court

Ky. Restaurants Review Minimum Wage Ruling

9 hours ago

Retailers across Kentucky are assessing the State Supreme Court’s ruling on local efforts to set a minimum wage.  That includes many in the restaurant business.

The state’s highest court yesterday ruled on wage increases in Lexington and Louisville invalid.   The court says only state lawmakers can act to raise the base rate. 

Kentucky Restaurant Association President Stacy Roof says it will be a business-by-business decision about whether to go back to the lower minimum wage of $7.25.  She says most of their workers are not making minimum wage.

A six-to-one Kentucky Supreme Court ruling Thursday struck down minimum wage increases in the state’s two largest cities.  



Lexington’s minimum wage increased 95 cents in July to eight $8.20 an hour.  The rate was scheduled to go up two more times over the next two years before resting at $10.10.

Kentucky’s highest court says the state’s Republican governor cannot cut the budgets of public colleges and universities without the approval of the state legislature.

The 5-2 ruling by the state Supreme Court reverses a lower court ruling that said Gov. Matt Bevin had the authority to order public colleges and universities not to spend all of the money the state legislature gave them.

Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear appealed, arguing Bevin’s order was illegal. A majority of the court agreed on Thursday, saying Bevin does not have that authority.

There's been much attention over the past week given to Rowan County clerk Kim Davis and her refusal to issue marriage licenses to gay couples.  Other related issues could come before state lawmakers.

The newest member of the Kentucky Supreme Court has been sworn in as a justice.

Joel Imel/Bowling Green Daily News


A judge in Frankfort is set to take up when to set a trial over the issue of Instant Racing at racetracks.

A hearing is scheduled for 9:30 a.m. Monday in Franklin Circuit Court after Kentucky officials requested a hearing to move the case toward a resolution.


Deputy Chief Justice Mary Noble of Lexington has become the first woman to preside over oral arguments in the Kentucky Supreme Court.  The issue before the Supreme Court was ineffective assistance of counsel in a criminal case. It's a fairly routine issue of appeal, but the proceedings were unique because, for the first time, a woman was sitting in the chief justice's chair.