kentucky

The Office of Andy Barr

Sixth District Rep. Andy Barr discussed his faith and civic responsibility in Lexington Monday evening. While the media was not allowed at the public meeting, it was shared beyond the sanctuary via Twitter.


Roxy Todd

 

"I’d love to be able to stay here,” said 32-year-old West Virginian Mark Combs. “The people are great. But it’s just dying. If you want to succeed you’ve gotta leave.”

Mark is an actor and an Iraqi war veteran. He thinks there has to be a better life, or at least better economic opportunities, elsewhere. He decided to head west for Los Angeles.  


U.S. Department of Energy

Paducah, Kentucky, is home to USEC, a Department of Energy uranium enrichment facility that operated for 50 years until being decommissioned in 2013.

Just across the Ohio River lies the Honeywell corporation’s Metropolis Works, the nation’s only uranium conversion plant.


Ohio Valley ReSource

With a speech planned for Cincinnati’s Ohio River waterfront, President Donald Trump has chosen a fitting venue to talk about infrastructure improvements.

The Ohio Valley is home to aging highways, bridges, and dams, poor drinking water systems, and weak internet service for many rural residents.

Izzy Bloomfield

Nearly half of the people living in rural parts of the United States don’t have access to broadband internet, the high speed connection required for common uses many of us take for granted.

Government and survey data show that in 65 counties across Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia, the majority of residents don’t have access to broadband — that’s one-quarter of all the counties in the three states. 


Kenn W. Kiser/Morguefile.org

Many political leaders in the Ohio Valley approve of President Trump’s decision to withdraw the United States from the Paris Climate Agreement.

But surveys indicate that public opinion across the region varies, with a slight majority saying they’d like the country to stay the course on climate change.


Jeanna Glisson

Jeanna Glisson has two lives: her life before August 20th, 2007, and her life after.

That day is so vivid, Glisson can still hear the sounds of her son’s feet coming down the stairs.

“I remember Derek when he got up that morning, he was on the phone talking to my dad. He was excited,” Glisson said.

 


Robert McGraw / WOUB

 

The true costs of the deep cuts in President Donald Trump’s proposed budget would fall disproportionately on many of the poor and working class people in the Ohio Valley region who helped to elect him, according to lawmakers and policy analysts.


Lexington Herald-Leader/Kentucky.com

President Donald Trump will be in Louisville, Kentucky Monday  evening.  As Cheri Lawson reports, the trip comes as the president is in what the White House calls ‘sell mode’ for the Republican healthcare bill, with a vote in the House planned for this week.  

Kentucky Republican Senator Rand Paul has been outspoken in his opposition to the replacement bill because it doesn’t go far enough to repeal the Affordable Care Act.

Democrats are planning a protest outside Louisville's Freedom Hall.

 

LRC.GOV

Disabled veterans who own small businesses would be advised of state contracts under legislation before the state Senate. The measure, sponsored by Owensboro Representative DJ Johnson, passed out of the Senate Veterans, Military Affairs, and Public Protection Committee last week.

“When there’s a small purchase contract bid going out, the agencies will be requested, or actually required, to have at least one disabled veteran small business owner bid on that contract, if there’s one available.”

Kentucky.com

Women in Kentucky with so-called dense breast tissue would be notified of that under legislation before state lawmakers aimed at improving early detection of breast cancer.

The Senate Health and Welfare Committee heard testimony saying 40 percent of women have dense breast tissue.  It’s described as breasts with more of such tissue than fatty tissue.  Bill sponsor Jim Duplessis said these women are twice as likely to develop breast cancer. 

Proposal for Adoption Task Force Before Ky Senate

Mar 13, 2017
Kentucky.gov

Kentucky lawmakers are being asked to establish an adoption task force,  the proposed legislation is awaiting action in the state Senate.

House Majority Caucus Chair David Meade said the panel would work to modify the adoption process in Kentucky.  He said it took 3-years for he and his wife to adopt their daughter.  The Stanford lawmaker said it’s very expensive and requires a lot of redundant paperwork.


Rebecca Kiger

Kentucky.com

Representatives of five programs at Eastern Kentucky University are joining together to track free-roaming horses in the rural southeastern part of the state by flying over Breathitt County early Friday.


FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — Duard Rutledge voted for Donald Trump and Rand Paul for the same reason: They’re not afraid of a fight.

That’s why the 66-year-old retired Toyota worker wasn’t worried to see Kentucky’s junior senator getting in the way of the Republican plan to replace Obama’s health care law.

“When you get two thoroughbreds, they are high strung,” he said. “But if you get them headed the right way they can both win the race.”

A controversial bill that would change the way local school districts assign students to schools is running out of time as lawmakers close in on the final four working days of the General Assembly.

The bill would give priority to students who live closest to schools — and would likely mean the end of Louisville’s anti-segregation program designed to mingle students from different races, backgrounds and parts of town in the same schools.

Bill Aims To Reduce Student Athlete Concussions

Mar 9, 2017
Kentucky.com

Kentucky lawmakers are considering steps to reduce concussion-related complications for student-athletes with a bill passed unanimously out of the Senate Education Committee Thursday.

Kentucky.com

The Kentucky House voted 77 to 18 in favor of a school calendar bill offering districts an option for when class begin after summer break.


Kentucky.com

The Kentucky Senate has added emergency first responders to the list of protected groups when it comes to hate crimes with a as 33 to 5 vote after much debate on the Senate floor Tuesday.


More than 81,000 Kentuckians signed up for health insurance plans during the first open enrollment period under Healthcare.gov, state officials reported on Tuesday. That’s almost as many Kentuckians as enrolled through the defunct Kynect last year.

The Bevin administration dismantled the state-based health insurance exchange as one of its first acts, keeping a campaign promise from Gov. Matt Bevin. Kynect was created by former Gov. Steve Beshear as part of the federal Affordable Care Act.

Kentuckytourism.Gov

Two state legislative resolutions calling for a national constitutional convention got a hearing Monday in Frankfort.  Elections, Constitutional Amendments, and Intergovernmental Affairs Committee Chair Kenny Imes told the packed room no vote would come this session, but the issue would be studied over the next year. 

 Bowling Green Representative Jim DeCesare’s resolution contains balanced budget and state’s rights language.

Eku.edu

Proposed legislation that would institute performance-based funding for public universities and community colleges is now on its way to the floor of the Kentucky House not without an unsuccessful effort Tuesday to make changes in the budget committee.

Damon Thayer

A bill doubling the individual campaign contribution limit in Kentucky continues to move through the General Assembly, emerging from the House Elections, Constitutional Amendments, and Intergovernmental Affairs Committee Monday.

Bill Aims To Reduce Deer Damage

Mar 7, 2017
Kentucky.com

The House is being asked to urge the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife to take steps to help reduce deer-related property or vehicle damage in certain regions of the Commonwealth, after the Senate passed a bill Friday.


'Religious Expression Bill' Moving Forward

Mar 6, 2017
Kentucky.com

The so-called “Freedom of Religious Expression” bill is before Kentucky House members and likely to get a vote this week after winning overwhelming approval in the Senate.

Senate Bill 17 spells out permission for school students to voluntarily express religious or political viewpoints in school assignments or during school activities.   Elizabethtown Representative Tim Moore carried the bill in the House Education Committee.

Over the past few years, there have been numerous documented instances of contaminated water leaching from a coal ash pond in Central Kentucky into groundwater and directly into Herrington Lake. Now, state regulators are investigating high levels of selenium in the lake’s fish, and they have fined utility Louisville Gas & Electric and Kentucky Utilities $25,000.

Rebecca Kiger

The Road To Recovery

On a recent gray winter morning Tomas Green drove the rain slick streets of Ranson in West Virginia’s Eastern Panhandle. No matter the weather, Green helps transport clients working through addiction at the Jefferson Day Report Center get to their treatment sessions and meetings.


After a lengthy debate and rushed legislative process, the state House of Representatives has passed a charter schools bill. The measure passed 56-39.

The legislation now heads to the state Senate, where it’s expected to pass.

Under the bill, private organizations and community members can apply to open up a charter school. Local school districts and the mayors of Lexington and Louisville would be charged with approving or denying the charters, though denials could be appealed to the state board of education.

With the clock ticking on this year’s General Assembly, a charter schools bill will be given its first hearing in a legislative committee on Friday and House Speaker Jeff Hoover said the measure will likely be heard on the House Floor for a potential vote later in the day.

Hoover said he’s confident the bill will pass despite past disagreements among Republicans over crucial parts of the legislation.

Stu Johnson

The so called "Blue Lives Matter" bill  to include police officers, firefighters, and emergency medical technicians in Kentucky’s hate crime statute is on its way to the full Senate. The measure easily passed out of the Senate State and Local Government Committee Wednesday.

If the legislation is enacted, anyone who attacks first responders could face an additional finding of a hate crime.  It would give judges and parole boards discretion when it comes to denying probation in those crimes.

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