heroin

Rebecca Kiger

Senate Passes Strict Penalty For Drug Dealing

Feb 15, 2017
Kentucky.com

 The Kentucky Senate has voted to make all trafficking in heroin or Fentanyl Class C felonies, a measure designed to help reduce overdose deaths.


Kentucky.com

The current heroin abuse problem in Kentucky is causing lawmakers on the House Education Committee to look for new ways to prevent sometimes deadly consequences of opioid use.


Alexandra Kanik | Ohio Valley ReSource

She asked to not be identified. And it’s understandable given the stigma attached to addiction. For this story, we’ll call her “Mary.”

 

Mary lives in eastern Kentucky and has struggled with an addiction that began with painkillers and progressed to heroin.

“As soon as I opened my eyes, I had to get it,” Mary said. “And even when I did get it, then I had to think of the next way that I was going to get.”

Mary was using when she learned she was pregnant with her first child. She sought treatment but the disease had a tight grip on her.

Advocate-Messenger

Some of the most riveting comments came during the Lexington Foum Thursday came from Alex Elswick.

He said the use of pain pills for wisdom teeth surgery turned into a four year addiction.  After starting with pills, Elswick said he only used heroin for six months before finding himself homeless in Dayton, Ohio, shooting up under a bridge. Elswick called his parents from a pay phone. “I’ve been kicked out of a treatment center.  I need help,” he told them.


Mary Meehan/Ohio Valley ReSource

Sitting on top of the Bible on Pastor Brad Epperson’s desk at the Clay City First Church of God is a list of goals for his small congregation written in a looping cursive hand.


CASA: Caring For Kids Caught In Addiction Crisis

Dec 27, 2016
Aaron Payne/Ohio Valley ReSource

The Ohio Valley’s opioid epidemic has effects far beyond the individuals struggling through addiction, with families and children suffering as well. An organization that helps children in abuse cases now sees substance abuse as a leading contributor, and could be overwhelmed by the addiction crisis.

AVOL

 

AIDS Volunteers Inc, of Lexington, has secured a $100,000 grant from the Elton John Foundation.  A large portion of the money will be used to purchase a mobile outreach vehicle that will provide HIV and Hepatitis C testing in Eastern and Central Kentucky. 

 


Kentucky Department of Transportation

The heroin epidemic is increasing the number of impaired drivers on Kentucky roads and law enforcement officials are being trained this week to better cope with the problem.


Cheri Lawson

Actress Jodie Sweetin,known for her role as Stephanie Tanner on the TV Series, Full House, spoke to a nearly full house Tuesday night at Northern Kentucky University about her 10-year struggle with alcohol and drug addiction.  


Aaron Payne/Ohio Valley ReSource

The sound of sirens in Cabell County, West Virginia, has a good chance of indicating an overdose these days.

The county’s Emergency Medical Service had responded to 622 overdose calls this year as of September 24, according to Emergency Services Director Gordon Merry. Last year it was more than 900 overdoses, which surpassed the total of the previous three years combined.   

From 2002 through 2006, there were no reported deaths from Heroin overdose in Lexington. Compare that to 44 such fatalities in 2013 and there’s apparently a problem. This week's Eastern Standard is an encore presentation of a show first aired on October 9, 2014

 

Guests for this week's show: Josh Nadzam - Researcher and writer for UnderMain (under-main.com); 

Richard Turner

As the 2015 session of the Kentucky General Assembly re-convenes, what issues are on your mind? The Local Option Sales Tax? A statewide smoke-free policy? An increase in the state's minimum wage? We're taking the show on the road to the State Capitol to speak with House Speaker Greg Stumbo and Senate President Robert Stivers.

We’re interested in your comments and questions before the show by email to wekueasternstandard at gmail dot com or on the phone at 859-622-1657.

From 2002 through 2006, there were no reported deaths from Heroin overdose in Lexington. Compare that to 44 such fatalities in 2013 and there’s apparently a problem. On this week’s Eastern Standard, we’ll meet the the researcher and creator of a multi-media report on the Explosion of Heroin Addiction in Lexington. 

Guests for this week's show: Josh Nadzam - Researcher and writer for UnderMain (under-main.com); 

Overdose Numbers Frustrate State Drug Czar

Jul 31, 2014
medicalxpress.com

A new report out Thursday says drug overdose deaths remained virtually the same in Kentucky over the last couple of years. 

A study by the Office of Drug Control Policy shows 1,007 people died in Kentucky from drug overdose in 2013, compared to 1,004 people in 2012.

Van Ingram, Director of the Office of Drug Control Policy, calls the report “frustrating.”

"While we've made some in-roads in prescription drug deaths, increases in heroin deaths kind of evened us out and plateaued and deaths remained largely the same," said Ingram.

kentucky.com

    

Lexington Police Lieutenant Scott Blakely says the central Kentucky community is home to a one and a half to two million dollar weekly drug habit.   While heroin-related overdose deaths are on a decline, the narcotics officer says crack cocaine use is on an uptick.  Blakely says cocaine and heroin sales take place all over Lexington.  "It is available from downtown to Heartland, from downtown to Beaumont.  With heroin, it was everywhere.  It's not just centered to downtown and neither is the cocaine and it never has been in Lexington," said Blakely.