health

Mary Meehan/Ohio Valley ReSource

 

Dressed in crisp blue scrubs, Certified Nurse Midwife JoAnne Burris walks briskly, the click of her sensible clogs a counterpoint to smooth jazz in the hall.

The University of Kentucky Midwife Clinic, with its large, color prints of newborns on earth-tone walls, still has that new furniture smell. But word-of-mouth already has the waiting room full.  


Aaron Payne | Ohio Valley ReSource

By most measures, health outcomes in the Ohio Valley region are not very good, with many parts of Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia ranking near the bottom among states.

But a team of health researchers may have found a few places within the region that stand out. They see them as potential “bright spots” — places with some health measures better than expected for the region. 


Ohio Valley ReSource on Eastern Standard

Nov 30, 2016
Marisa Hempel

You’ve been hearing stories  from the Ohio Valley ReSource, With topics such as  Agriculture, the Economy, Energy, and Health: they are the product of a regional journalism collaborative, of which WEKU is part.

 


We’ll meet some of the people behind the Ohio Valley ReSource, including the newest addition to the WEKU news department.

 

Marisa Hempel

Health issues are in the news often these days.


From hundreds of reported overdoses in Kentucky, to concerns about the Zika Virus...to the annual push for flu shots...problems with drug abuse in central and Southeastern Kentucky, and skyrocketing prices for medicine like the EpiPen: all will be discussed with Fayette County Health Commissioner Dr. Kraig Humbaugh.

 

For Kentucky workers who have health insurance through their employers, the number enrolled in high-deductible plans has risen sharply over the last eight years. That's according to a new report by the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky reported in the Daily News.

 

University of Kentucky

The University of Kentucky’s Center for Excellence in Rural Health is one of 38 organizations to receive funding from the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services. The $1 million grant will be used to help children in Appalachia get the health insurance they need, as well as provide to families that are eligible to coverage. Many Kentucky families are unaware they qualify for healthcare coverage so do not look into signing up for them or their children. This is especially difficult in rural parts of Eastern Kentucky, where healthcare providers have a hard time gaining access to those that need it most.


The man most responsible for building a new hospital at the University of Kentucky says the facility’s ready for its “close up” this weekend. The one-point-two million square foot facility includes two patient-care floors with 128 intensive care and acute care beds.  Vice president for Health Affairs Michael Karpf says the new facility is much more adaptable than the old hospital.

It was reported today that Humana intends to stop hiring smokers, where the action is legally permitted. The company wants to encourage healthy behavior among workers and already has a policy of not hiring smokers in southwestern Ohio.