gay

John Hingsbergen

A crowd estimated at about 1000 gathered in Lexington Sunday for the community’s first LGBTQ Pride Rally and March.

Organizers say the event on the downtown Courthouse Square was planned in “solidarity” with a national rally in Washington, D.C.   


Judge Opposed to Gay Adoptions Has Rule Change Blocked

May 20, 2017
Lisa Autry - WKYU

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — A Kentucky judge who declared his conscientious objection to handling adoption cases involving gay adults has been blocked from changing how he reviews adoption cases.

Judge W. Mitchell Nance submitted the proposed rule to the state's chief justice, John D. Minton Jr.

Administrative Office of the Courts spokeswoman Leigh Anne Hiatt said Friday that Minton had denied the request on procedural and substantive grounds.

Nance declined comment through a court official.

kentucky.com

The Kentucky Court of Appeals has ruled a Lexington business did not discriminate when it refused to print T-shirts for a gay pride festival.  A decision about whether to appeal Friday’s ruling to a higher court could come in just a few days.

The case involves the business Hands On Originals’ decision not to print the T-shirts for Lexington’s 2012 Pride Festival.  Store Managing Owner Blaine Adamson said in a teleconference Friday,“religious liberty is our most important freedom," adding, "It's not really free if beliefs are confined to our minds.”

Noah Day

  The Supreme Court last week issued a much-anticipated ruling last week, declaring that marriage can no longer be denied to same-sex couple anywhere in the U.S.  On this week's show, we’ll meet some of the people involved in the issue in the Commonwealth. 

Our guests on this week's program are:

Country Star Chely Wright Discusses Film, Coming Out & Equality

Sep 28, 2012

In 2010, Chely Wright became the first country music star to come out as gay.  Wright’s three-year journey to her coming out day is the subject of a new documentary by filmmakers Bobbie Berleffi and Beverly Kopf.

The Louisville-based Presbyterian Church U.S.A. will soon allow the ordination of gay and lesbian clergy members. A majority of the denomination's regional governing bodies–called presbyteries–have agreed to lift the requirement that unmarried clergy remain celibate, which was previously part of the church's constitution.