feedback

Last week, we passed along a comment from Richard in Lexington who advised us to not waste our money on future Capitol Steps specials.  We’ve had just one reply to a request for others to weigh in.  Samantha wrote, “I have to say that I agree. I thought I was a little late tuning in to The World but was unpleasantly surprised when I heard a song about the upcoming royal baby instead.”

A writer identifying as “Lydia” posted the following, using the Disqus feature on our website.  Beginning by referring to the retirements of  WEKU employees Carol Siler and Michael Carter, “Thank you for all that you brought to the station and all the enjoyment your listeners got from your work. May your metaphorical fund drives be short, your programming schedule full, and your listener feedback above average. (So to speak.)”


In a budget-cutting effort, Eastern Kentucky University has eliminated over 180 staff positions.  Among those were two well-known WEKU employees who opted for early retirement, Development Coordinator Carol Siler and Music Director/Classic 102.1 host Michael Carter.

As you can imagine, most of this week’s interaction has been on the topic of fund-raising.

A listener, choosing to remain anonymous, sent us a note following last week’s coverage of The Best of Bluegrass activities, “I really enjoyed the Gangstagrass and Appalatin music tonight. Thank  you for incorporating those two shows. I have enjoyed all the bluegrass coverage  this week.”

Brad, from Wilmore, e-mailed us, “I have not, do not, and probably will not listen to the new game show programs airing on WEKU.   Except for 'Wait, Wait . . .'  I find these programs, silly, corny, frivolous, and vacuous (without substance)."

Let's see, Ed from Lexington called station manager Roger Duvall.  Karen emailed from London, Kentucky.   Another Karen posted on Facebook, as did Terry.  Meanwhile Chad tweeted about it.  And this all happened Saturday evening.

We begin this week with a brief follow-up to the technical difficulties that virtually destroyed the 6 – 7 am hour of Morning Edition last Monday.  The outage was a result of an equipment failure at NPR’s pristine new studios in our nation’s capital city.

We have a few backlogged comments that have never been on the air due to reaction to coverage of the Boston Marathon bombings.

Following our broadcast of concerns about the amount of coverage we provided following the Boston bombings last week, we received the following email from listener Lisa, saying she agrees.  She writes, “I love your station and listen all the time. I usually donate once, often twice a year and will gladly donate more when I secure a full time job."

All our comments this week relate to coverage of last week’s tragic events in Boston. 

An Easter weekend broadcast on both WEKU and Classic 102.1 brought a couple of responses on our Listener Comment Line. 

By e-mail, we received this note from listener Joan, “My entire radio experience was changed when I first heard your new format.  (My hours listening increased as did my twice annual contributions of many years.) The only time I am very unhappy with your programing is, of course, during fund raising weeks." 

As you likely know, we just finished our Spring Fund Drive and got a lot of comments from listeners along with donations.  Mostly positive, as could be expected.

We had a call from a  very nice gentleman who describes himself as “a night listener.”  He’s unhappy with the lack of overnight classical music on weekends and not a fan of the two food shows back-to-back on Sunday, namely America’s Test Kitchen and the Splendid Table.

I mentioned last week that we heard some great comments at the six community meetings we held around the WEKU listening area last month. From our session in Hazard, Adam asked us to consider covering the arts in his community the way we do for Lexington,  “I know you cover a wide area, not just Lexington and Hazard but all around but I’d like to see a lot more of these local events profiled.”

We heard some great comments at the six community meetings we held around the WEKU listening area.   We visited Hazard,  Lexington, Corbin and Frankfort, held a meeting in Richmond and another one in Danville.

First up, a comment we didn’t have time for last week:  Helen, from the Lexington area, emailed us saying she’s no fan of two midday programs on our sister station, Classic 102.1, those being The Score and On a Lighter Note.

Leslie, of Corinth, e-mailed us this week: “I absolutely love your programming. Admittedly, I'm an NPR junkie, but I really like your format. My only wish is that you and WUKY offered me an alternative to that godawful Prairie Home Companion. I understand that it's popular, but could you possibly offer it at another time?”

At the WEKU Stations, we serve our listeners best when we take the time to hear your issues and concerns. To that end, we invite you to join us at a community meeting designed to tell you about what’s  going on with us and, more importantly, for us to hear your feedback about how we can better serve you and your community.

Here's the meeting schedule, all times 5:30 – 7:00  pm:

First up today, a reaction to last week’s comments.  One of those was a concern about the nature of the humor in Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me.  The other, feeling our programming promotes what he described as the “homosexual agenda.”

This week, we have some programming recommendations as well as technical concerns.

A little more than a week ago, we launched a new lineup of weekend programs, beginning with a couple on Friday evenings, namely The Dinner Party and Wits.  Most of the comments we received focused on what we dropped, not what we added to the schedule.

WEKU is always interested in comments from our listeners but, especially now as we launch our 2012 Listener Survey.  Please take a few minutes to click this link and complete the survey with information about your listening habits and what you think about our programming. 

Last week, WEKU made an appeal to our listeners and online community for feedback on the political activities of public radio’s Garrison Keillor. WEKU Program Director John Hingsbergen has summarized the responses.

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