Education

1:09pm

Mon September 26, 2011
Education

Homework Club Helps Students Succeed

Trailblazer volunteer Dianna Reed helps Colyn Young, left, and Grace Powe with their homework during the Hannah McClure Homework Club. The club meets every Wednesday afternoon after school
Bob Flynn Winchester Sun

For most kids, having to stay after school to study is not a good thing. But for the students in Winchester's Hannah McClure Elementary School Homework Club, staying after school and studying is actually something they enjoy and look forward to. The Homework Club, which began last spring and is voluntary, meets every Wednesday after school, and community volunteers and teachers are there to help the third-fifth grade students with their homework, or to hone their math or reading skills.

1:42pm

Sun September 25, 2011
Education

Scott County Faces School Crowding

Scott County Schools administrators know they need a second high school. They just can’t afford it. Superintendent Patricia Putty said in an interview that the district has to look at what the immediate need is based on student capacity and the cost. A new high school will cost the district about $50 million. The new elementary school will cost the district roughly $13 million — at a time when the district’s state funding has declined more than $750,000 in the last four years.

1:36pm

Sun September 25, 2011
Education

Fayette Co. Schools Cope with Growth

Third-grade teacher Kelly Morris gave her class a morning work test in her portable classroom at Liberty Elementary last week. The rapid growth in Fayette schools, has forced many schools, to add portable classrooms.
Charles Bertram Lexington Herald-Leader

Enrollment in Fayette County Public Schools continues to grow by several hundred students or more annually — roughly the equivalent of a whole new school every year — seemingly with no end in sight. Fayette County had 33,481 students in the 2005-06 school year. By last year, enrollment had jumped 10 percent, to 36,775. This year, it's up 2 percent, to 37,365. If you include children in the district's Early Start program, enrollment exceeds 38,000. The rapid expansion has left school administrators weighing how best to serve students — whether to spend money on buildings or on services — and has left students with crowded conditions at several schools.

4:42pm

Fri September 23, 2011
Education

Law Symposium Examines Effects Of Budget Cuts

A law symposium being held in Lexington is focusing on funding cuts to the justice system. The American Bar Association is calling the situation a "crisis." Underfunded, overburdened, and misunderstood - that's how American Bar Association president Bill Robinson has described the modern justice system in the U.S. He says funding cuts are pushing courts to the breaking point.

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3:45pm

Thu September 22, 2011
Education

Superintendent Vows Transparent Decisions

In his 15th day on the job, new Fayette County Public Schools superintendent Tom Shelton spoke to some of the area's business leaders Thursday at an event hosted by Commerce Lexington.  Shelton comes to Fayette County after serving as superintendent in Daviess County. Shelton says he's working on building a strong relationship with the Board of Education, and will have visited all 56 district schools by the end of the week.

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1:11pm

Thu September 22, 2011
Education

Kenton County Schools Deep in the Red

The Kenton County School Board passed a working budget for the 2011/2012 fiscal year Sept. 12 with expenditures expected to exceed revenue by $3.2 million. “This is something we knew was coming, something we need to prepare for now,” Kenton County Schools executive director of finance Kelley Gamble told board members while presenting his report.

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12:53pm

Thu September 22, 2011
Education

AP Students in Kentucky Scoring High

A program aimed at helping more Kentucky high school students succeed in college-level courses is taking credit for dramatic increases in the state's scores this year. The nonprofit Kentucky Science & Technology Corp. said in a news release Thursday that students participating in the AdvanceKentucky initiative accounted for only 22 percent of test-takers this year, but contributed 83 percent of passing scores statewide in Advanced Placement exams. The Kentucky Department of Education last week reported that more than 23,500 state public school students took Advanced Placement examinations in 2011, a 44 percent rise since 2007.

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12:43pm

Thu September 22, 2011
Education

Science Teacher Leaves Test Tubes Behind

Boyle County Middle School science teacher Mike Tetirick is leaving three-beam balances, graduated cylinders and thermometers in the last century with landline phones and CD players. 
Instead, his eighth-graders are using state-of-the-art Vernier probes to measure everything from temperature to force to pH levels, and they’re likely the only students in the state to do so, he said.

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2:27pm

Tue September 20, 2011
Education

Out of the Office and Into the Classroom

Gary Fields, principal at Bowling Green High School, talks to students Amy Cherry (left) and Claire Samuels during their freshman AP world history class Sept. 13.
Miranda Pederson The Daily News

Assistant Principal William King didn’t go into his office at Bowling Green High School at all on Sept. 13, but he was still working. He organized No Office Day, an initiative for principals to spend an entire day out of their offices and in classrooms engaging with teachers and students. “It’s something new,” King said. “It’s something that good principals ought to be doing anyway. It shows that our hearts are still with teachers.”

10:42am

Tue September 20, 2011
Education

12 Kentucky School Districts Share $8.8 million

A dozen Kentucky school districts will share in an $8.8 million "integration grant" from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to help implement new common core content standards and take other steps to boost instruction. The recipients are the districts for Daviess, Fleming, Gallatin, Jessamine, Lee, Owen, Washington, Jefferson, Kenton, Magoffin and Simpson counties, and Jackson Independent Schools.

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12:10pm

Sun September 18, 2011
Education

Kentucky Schools Awarded Blue Ribbon Honor

Two Central Kentucky schools and one Eastern Kentucky school were named as 2011 National Blue Ribbon Schools based on their overall academic excellence or their success in closing achievement gaps, according to a release from the Kentucky Department of Education. Among the Kentucky schools honored with the designation were Mary Queen of the Holy Rosary School in Lexington, North Middletown Elementary in Bourbon County and Southside Elementary in Pike County. Others named in Kentucky were Gamaliel Elementary in Monroe County, W.R. McNeil Elementary in Bowling Green and Woodhill Elementary in Fort Thomas.

11:51am

Sun September 18, 2011
Education

Schools Serving More Homeless Children

Hundreds of children come in and out of Amy Carter’s office each year, but one family stands out. Last year, she worked with siblings at Warren Elementary School whose mother was arrested and then sent to a rehabilitation center. The children bounced from relative to relative, hardly ever staying in the same place for more than a week. As the economy continues to dwindle, local school districts are experiencing a surge in homeless students. Last year, Warren County Public Schools identified 206 students as being homeless - the year before, only 90 students were considered homeless.

3:12pm

Fri September 16, 2011
Education

Universities Resist National Teacher Survey

U.S. News & World Report recently released its university rankings for the year; next year they're set to rate the quality of teacher preparation programs. Kentucky was among the first states contacted as part of the review, done in partnership with the National Council on Teacher Quality, but officials at UK and the state's other public universities declined to take part, citing concerns about the survey's methodology. 

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12:42pm

Fri September 16, 2011
Education

Author Declines University of Louisville Award

Amid allegations that he falsified parts of his best-selling books “Three Cups of Tea” and “Stones Into Schools,” author Greg Mortenson has turned down the University of Louisville’s Grawemeyer Award in Education.

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9:26am

Thu September 15, 2011
Education

Bus Driver Accused of Assaulting 8-year-old

A bus driver for the Christian County Public Schools turned herself in Tuesday afternoon to Hopkinsville police after being accused of assaulting an 8-year-old girl on a bus, according to a Hopkinsville police report. The driver was arrested on a charge of fourth-degree assault, a misdemeanor.

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9:12am

Thu September 15, 2011
Education

Suit says Breathitt Schools Did Not Protect Student

A Breathitt County teacher continued to have sexual contact with a middle school girl after administrators failed to investigate claims about the alleged abuse, the girl's mother contends in a federal lawsuit. Administrators did not report the alleged abuse as required or take action to prevent or stop it, the lawsuit claims. In a related criminal case, several school officials have been charged with failing to report the alleged sexual contact to police and other authorities, a misdemeanor.

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1:35pm

Wed September 14, 2011
Education

UK Receives Federal Engineering Grant

The U.S. Department of Energy announced Tuesday it would give $1.5 million to the University of Kentucky to train engineering students to become industrial energy efficiency experts. In total, more than $30 million was being awarded to 24 universities in 23 states.

12:38pm

Wed September 14, 2011
Education

KY Schools Prominent in Magazine Rankings

In an annual ranking of colleges and universities by US News and World Report, Kentucky schools were more prevalent.  Among the best in the south are Murray, Morehead State, Western and Eastern Kentucky Universities.  Nationally, US News & World Report placed the University of Kentucky at 124th. It's a slight improvement over last year's numbers.

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4:47pm

Tue September 13, 2011
Education

UK AD can Hire Daughter

The daughter of University of Kentucky athletics director Mitch Barnhart will work in the same department. UK’s Board of Trustees approved the position this afternoon. Unlike the president, provost, and other school administrators, executives, the director of athletics is not named in the university’s nepotism rules. Still, several trustees do not think Barnhart’s daughter should be allowed to work in his department.  

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3:43pm

Tue September 13, 2011
Education

Diversity Initiative at Transylvania

Two announcements from Transylvania University this week show the school putting more emphasis on diversity. The university is broadening its religious studies program and welcoming its first director of campus diversity. Following a ten-year theological project funded by a Lily Endowment grant, Transylvania president Owen Williams says it's time for the university to embrace new model of campus ministry - one that both reaffirms its ties to Disciples of Christ while shifting toward more interfaith dialogue. Williams says the move is a reaction both to changing demographics and changing attitudes.

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1:04pm

Tue September 13, 2011
Education

High School Equivalency Exams Change

The new common core state standards implemented in schools across Kentucky and 42 other states at the beginning of the school year have changed the academic landscape for all students. The new standards were designed to provide a consistent, clear understanding of what students are expected to learn in a way that is relevant to the real world. The new standards have also changed the expectations and rigor for those students who have dropped out of school and are looking to get a General Education Diploma (GED) at one of the 120 adult education centers across the state.

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11:15am

Tue September 13, 2011
Education

New Busing Plan for Louisville

The UCLA professor and contracted expert on student assignment said it’s possible for Jefferson County Public Schools to create diverse schools with less transportation by next fall.  “Well I think the longest ride times would be less than half the longest ride times now. That’s my guess,” Dr. Gary Orfield told the JCPS school board.

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3:42pm

Mon September 12, 2011
Education

11 Injured in School Bus Wreck

Bowling Green students who were riding a bus involved in an accident are transferred today to another bus with the help of Bowling Green firefighters at Russellville Road and Veterans Memorial Lane. Several students were transported to an area hospital.
Joe Imel The Daily News

An adult and 10 children were injured Monday morning when a Bowling Green Independent Schools bus collided with a car at Russellville Road and Campbell Lane. City schools Bus 4, loaded with about 50 children and bound for Bowling Green Junior High School, was traveling west on Russellville Road when it attempted to make a left turn onto Campbell Lane and collided with a car driven by Paula Borden, 42, of Bowling Green, Bowling Green Police Department spokesman Officer Ronnie Ward said. Borden and seven children were taken by ambulance to The Medical Center. The parents of three other children also took their children to the emergency room for treatment, officials said. No one was seriously injured, Bowling Green schools spokeswoman Leslie Peek said.

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10:03am

Sun September 11, 2011
Education

Reminding Students of 9/11

South Warren Middle School seventh-graders watch a documentary titled "9/11" on Thursday in a history class at the school. Today marks the 10th anniversary of the terrorist attacks.
Alex Slitz Bowling Green Daily News

Lauren Goff was in middle school on Sept. 11, 2001. Now, 10 years later, she has to teach today’s middle schoolers about that day, a day of which they have no memory. Goff, a history teacher at South Warren Middle School, said she struggled with how to explain the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks to her seventh-graders, who were just 2 years old when they happened. “To them, it seems just as ancient as ancient Rome,” Goff said.

10:45am

Fri September 9, 2011
Education

9/11 Not Big Part of School Curriculum

Things have certainly changed. The world is definitely a different place. But do we continue to learn, 10 years after the tragedy of Sept. 11, 2001? Students and teachers, no doubt, took time to discuss the matter in school this week. Maybe it was a small part of a lesson, maybe it was a whole class, but the events of that day do not appear to have worked their way into the fabric of U.S. and world history classes like D-day or the bombing of Pearl Harbor.

10:33am

Fri September 9, 2011
Education

Work Begins on Robertson School

Work has already begun to create a level building site for the new Robertson County School building on the corner of U.S. 62 and Kentucky 616 near Mount Olivet.
Wendy Mitchell Ledger Independent

Mother Nature was no match Wednesday night for the determination of those who have spent more than a decade pressing for a new school for Robertson County students. With rain pouring down, and the ground-breaking ceremony moved indoors, officials recounted what brought the group together and will result in an entire new educational complex on the corner of U.S. 62 and Kentucky 616 in the next 18 months. Known as Deming School for decades, the new complex will be known as Robertson County School, and house all grade levels, officials said.

10:25am

Fri September 9, 2011
Education

Teachers Recall 9/11 Emotions

T.K. Stone Middle School teacher Kerrie Bal works with Graham Meek, left, Ramsey Deaton and Will Dykeman on their 9/11 project on Thursday. They're learning about the different perspectives of groups affected by the attacks.
Kelly Cantrall News Enterprise

As the world stopped 10 years ago on Sept. 11, 2001, frozen in the aftermath of terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, educators in Hardin County juggled watching with guiding classrooms of children through an event some were too young to understand. Wynna Mabe, a teacher at Lincoln Trail Elementary School, said she felt many of her students saw the crumbling towers as a scene from a movie, instead of realizing it involved real people. It was hard for elementary students to comprehend the enormity of the attacks, she said.

3:14pm

Thu September 8, 2011
Education

Patton Administration Prominent in Education History

Media panelists discuss history of education during conference at Eastern Kentucky University.
Charles Compton WEKU News

When the history of education in the Commonwealth was recounted today during a conference at Eastern Kentucky University, former-Governor Paul Patton was repeatedly cited.  The Patton Administration was credited by historians with reforming the state’s system of education.  Referring to statistics released yesterday, Patton told attendees the pace of progress in Kentucky is faster than most other states.

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10:41am

Thu September 8, 2011
Education

Teachers Struggle with Lessons on 9-11

Shannon Maddox first heard the news through a phone call from a colleague.  A plane had struck the World Trade Center in New York City. She immediately turned the television on in her Crittenden Mt. Zion Elementary classroom. It wasn’t long after that teachers were told to keep their students in their classrooms and no one was allowed to go outside.

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9:42am

Thu September 8, 2011
Education

College Freshmen Remember 9-11

Many of the freshmen who stepped on the UK campus this fall were in elementary school at the time of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. For many Americans, it seems hard to forget the events of 9/11; the place they were, the people they were with, and even what they were doing that day. But what about young people who were mere children when it happened? Two University of Kentucky freshmen took the opportunity to share their thoughts about September 11th.

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