broadband

Zach Redding

  


Lexington Leaders Assessing Rural Broadband Options

Sep 25, 2017
kentuckywired.ky.gov

Lexington government leaders are studying the best ways to extend high-speed broadband fiber connectivity in rural areas of Fayette County.

Council's Environmental Quality and Public Works Committee gave the issue attention last week. 


Pixaby

More than two million people across the Ohio Valley live in areas that lack any option for fast and reliable internet service.

This week some of them had a chance to tell a member of the Federal Communications Commission what that means for their work, studies, and everyday life.  


Ohio Valley ReSource

With a speech planned for Cincinnati’s Ohio River waterfront, President Donald Trump has chosen a fitting venue to talk about infrastructure improvements.

The Ohio Valley is home to aging highways, bridges, and dams, poor drinking water systems, and weak internet service for many rural residents.

Izzy Bloomfield

Nearly half of the people living in rural parts of the United States don’t have access to broadband internet, the high speed connection required for common uses many of us take for granted.

Government and survey data show that in 65 counties across Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia, the majority of residents don’t have access to broadband — that’s one-quarter of all the counties in the three states. 


Benny Becker

Kentucky is working on a multimillion dollar plan to bring broadband internet to the eastern part of the state, home to some of the country’s most impoverished places. A federal report released this year found that from around a third to nearly half of rural residents in Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia lack high-speed internet and the job opportunities that come with it. But a few areas are ahead of the curve. In Kentucky’s Jackson and Owsley Counties, broadband has already arrived and is already creating jobs.

Experts Predict Eastern Ky Broadband Benefits Decades Away

Sep 18, 2015
Stu Johnson / WEKU News

Government and business representatives are in Lexington this week for the Fiber for the New Economy Conference. Among the issues discussed at the meeting is the expansion of broadband into eastern Kentucky. Urban County Government Chief Information Officer Aldona Valicenti says local governments will pay a cost for the growth.  “And that last mile still will need additional investment and that will depend on what companies are willing to invest and what the cities can do in eastern Kentucky,” said Valicenti.

centertech.com

A Federal Communications Commission fund is paying $21 million annually to Windstream Communications Inc. to make broadband Internet service available to more than 62,000 rural homes and businesses in Kentucky.

Richard Turner

    

Studies indicate that having access to the Internet increases employment and income, enhances consumer welfare and promotes civic engagement. But, of Kentucky’s 120 counties, 45 have been described as in the “slow lane” of the Information Highway. 

On this week’s EST, we’ll discuss efforts to bring Kentucky’s internet access up to speed.

Our guests:  

- Brian E. Kiser, Executive Director of the Commonwealth Office of Broadband Outreach and Development;