Affordable Care Act

Lexington Herald-Leader/Kentucky.com

President Donald Trump will be in Louisville, Kentucky Monday  evening.  As Cheri Lawson reports, the trip comes as the president is in what the White House calls ‘sell mode’ for the Republican healthcare bill, with a vote in the House planned for this week.  

Kentucky Republican Senator Rand Paul has been outspoken in his opposition to the replacement bill because it doesn’t go far enough to repeal the Affordable Care Act.

Democrats are planning a protest outside Louisville's Freedom Hall.

 

Vice President Mike Pence stopped in Louisville Saturday to pitch the Republican plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

“The Obamacare nightmare is about to end,” Pence said before a crowd of about 150 business owners.

The visit came as President Trump tries to rally support for the plan, especially among conservatives like Kentucky U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, who favors an outright repeal of Obamacare.

More than 81,000 Kentuckians signed up for health insurance plans during the first open enrollment period under Healthcare.gov, state officials reported on Tuesday. That’s almost as many Kentuckians as enrolled through the defunct Kynect last year.

The Bevin administration dismantled the state-based health insurance exchange as one of its first acts, keeping a campaign promise from Gov. Matt Bevin. Kynect was created by former Gov. Steve Beshear as part of the federal Affordable Care Act.

The GOP plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act — which was leaked to Politico and reported on Friday — would eliminate the money given to states for Medicaid expansion starting in 2020.

It would decrease the subsidies people receive for buying health insurance on the individual market, instead putting in tax credits that would increase as users age.

Barr Campaign

Sixth District Representative Andy Barr says he supports President Donald Trump’s controversial executive order banning travel to the U.S. from seven predominantly Muslim countries.

In a conversation with WEKU’s John Hingsbergen, the congressman also expressed his support for the president’s nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch (GORE-such) to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Commonwealth Fund

States initiatives to expand health insurance coverage through either traditional Medicaid or private insurance have equally good outcomes for low-income adults, according to a study released Tuesday.

The Harvard’s School of Public Health study compared survey results from 5,600 low-income adults in Kentucky, Arkansas and Texas.

The study was released as Kentucky’s new governor mulls reforming the Medicaid expansion. Kentucky expanded its Medicaid program under the Affordable Care Act while Democratic Gov. Steve Beshear was in office. Arkansas, however, used federal dollars to pay for private health insurance for low-income adults.

wikipedia.org

The number of people in Kentucky without health insurance fell 5.8 percent last year, the largest drop of any state in the country according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

Kentucky was one of 31 states that chose to increase the number of people eligible to receive taxpayer-funded health insurance in 2013. Since then, the Commonwealth has added about 400,000 people to its Medicaid program and has been held up as an example by President Barack Obama of the success of his health care law.

In Debate, Bevin and Conway Tout Rural Roots, Clash Over Kynect

Jul 23, 2015
Ryland Barton

Kentucky’s major party candidates for governor squared off Thursday at a forum hosted by the Kentucky Farm Bureau, the first public appearance in which the two men directly responded to one another.

kipsq.org/MomBaby.aspx

Kentucky hospitals have cut their workforce by 10 percent since 2013 as they prepare for an estimated $7 billion in federal cuts by 2024 because of the implementation of the Affordable Care Act.

getcovered-ky.org

A family of four in Kentucky earning more than $24,250 a year has until midnight Sunday to sign up for health insurance to avoid a federal tax penalty.

kentucky.com

The two candidates in Kentucky’s sixth congressional district race stand on opposite sides when it comes to health care reform.  Incumbent Andy Barr and challenger Elisabeth Jensen appeared Monday night on KET'S Kentucky Tonight.  Barr argues current reforms will leave states like Kentucky with unaffordable Medicaid costs.  "The state simply doesn't have the capacity to fund, at this point, this massive expansion of Medicaid.  This is going to crowd out our ability to fund education," said Barr.

Eastern Ky. Counties Lead Affordable Care Act Enrollment

Feb 23, 2014

Kynect.Ky.gov is the tool Kentuckians have used to sign up for health insurance, but in Eastern Kentucky an old fashioned, boots-on-the-ground outreach — in restaurants, cash advance businesses, and churches — appears to be key to getting people to use the website.

Since open enrollment began Oct. 1, more than 231,367 Kentuckians have enrolled in health insurance made available through the Affordable Care Act.

Tom Martin of the Lexington Herald Leader speaks with Margaret Levi, lawyer with the ­Lexington firm of Wyatt, Tarrant & Combs, and author of The Impact of Health Care Reform on Kentucky ­Employers, a 68-page booklet published by the Kentucky Chamber of Commerce.

Read more here on Kentucky.com 

Read more here: http://www.kentucky.com/2013/10/07/2864150/what-kentucky-businesses-need.html#storylink=cpy