Morning Edition

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Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep and Rachel Martin in Washington, D.C., and David Greene at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep, Martin and Greene often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first-hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices such as news analyst Cokie Roberts as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, Host:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, Host:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

Spring is a mean season for high school seniors. It's college acceptance time. And if students don't get in, they never find out why.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, Host:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

Thank you for joining us.

PHILIP SANDS: Hi. Hello.

MONTAGNE: Can you tell us what exactly happened in Latakia?

Muffin top joined the lexicon years ago. Now, it is among the newest words recognized by the Oxford English Dictionary. The self-proclaimed "last word on words" defines muffin top as the top part of a muffin, as well as, "a protuberance of flesh above the waistband of a tight pair of trousers."

When Russian President Dmitry Medvedev was a high school disc jockey, he had to get permission from a Communist youth league to play songs by the British rock band Deep Purple. Before a recent concert in Moscow, Medvedev invited the band to his home.

Mobile phone giant AT&T has announced plans to buy major rival T-Mobile. If the deal goes through, AT&T would dominate U.S. telecommunications. It's reminiscent of when Ma Bell had a monopoly over the industry. Bloomberg New technology columnist Rich Jaroslovsky talks to Linda Wertheimer about the concerns of a monopoly.

Libya Update

Mar 25, 2011

In the skies over Libya, NATO will take command of the no-fly zone. U.S. air and sea power will remain a key factor in keeping Moammar Gadhafi's troops from attacking. But on the ground, Libyan rebels are stalled in their efforts to advance on government forces. And civilians are fleeing the front lines of the fighting.

Protests against the Syrian government have been taking place at a small border city. Those leading the protests say that dozens of people have been killed by government troops. The Syrian government has pledged to consider lifting some repressive laws to ease the crisis. Phil Sands, a reporter for the National, an English-language newspaper based in the United Arab Emirates, talks to Renee Montagne about the protests.

An unusual passenger arrived on a train platform in Scotland. A ferret came all the way from London. The animal was found after the train departed from Haymarket Station in Edinburgh. The ferret was missing an owner and a ticket. An animal shelter has taken him in. A spokeswoman said "he's obviously someone's pet."

Back in 1983, Forrest Lunsway had a blind date. Rose Pollard went out with him, and they discovered they both loved to dance. Lunsway was in his 70s then but he waited 20 years to propose. Pollard put him off, saying she'd marry him on his 100th birthday. They got married on Saturday.

There's a tradition in which politicians try to hold back criticism of the president while he's on foreign soil. President Obama had not even stepped off Air Force One Wednesday when Speaker John Boehner released a letter listing pointed questions on the administration's plan for Libya.

Japan Nuclear Update

Mar 24, 2011

NPR's Jon Hamilton reports on the latest developments relating to Japan's damaged nuclear power complex.

In key Libyan cities, anti-government rebels have been unable so far to dislodge forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi, despite help from airstrikes and a no-fly zone from the Western coalition. Yet the rebels' provisional body is moving ahead with efforts to build a political structure to better define what the revolution stands for.

Meantime, there's creeping fear and paranoia in the rebel capital that people loyal to Gadhafi are trying to undermine those efforts through violence and intimidation.

Detective John Rebus of the Edinburgh police force has retired after 17 novels and a slew of short stories. His creator, Scottish author Ian Rankin, has now written a new book with a new protagonist, a cop who works in the division of internal affairs — in other words, a cops who chases cops. The book, The Complaints, feels like it has the potential to become a new series.

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

NPR's Gloria Hillard has this appreciation of Elizabeth Taylor's life.

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

You're listening to MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Welcome to the program.

ARTHUR GOLDHAMMER: Good morning.

INSKEEP: Let's start with the Europeans, Britain and France. What do they disagree on when you talk about them and the United States?

It's dinner time at the House of Blessings and Longevity, a nursing home in Japan's Iwate prefecture. Seniors eat their tofu and rice while documentary footage of past tsunamis airs on the television.

Daisuke Hirata, the manager of another nursing home in nearby Ofunato city, is looking after nine of his elderly residents who were brought here to Oshu city after the tsunami damaged his facility. Hirata still looks shocked as he recalls the seniors' reactions when the powerful quake hit.

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Good morning.

ALEX KELLOGG: Good morning. How are you doing?

INSKEEP: You reported from Detroit for many years. What does a shrinking city look like when you move around it?

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Welcome to the program, sir.

RICHARD HAASS: Thank you.

INSKEEP: What's wrong with this intervention?

HAASS: The president has essentially articulated ambitious goals, but he keeps talking about how limited the means are.

Wednesday marks a year since President Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act into law.

But in those ensuing 12 months, the debate has barely missed a beat.

On Capitol Hill, Democrats have continued to sing the measure's praises.

"With this landmark law, we made health insurance and health care a right, not a privilege, for all Americans," said House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi, "by extending coverage to 32 million more Americans."

In California's Silicon Valley, the economy is finally showing signs of a turnaround. Social media companies like Twitter and Facebook are generating a lot of new excitement, and there's even been a slight uptick in hiring. Still, the recession has done considerable damage to the region's economy, and the unemployment rate remains high.

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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