Morning Edition on WEKU

Weekdays 5-9am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

Local Anchor(s): 
Stu Johnson
Local Host(s): 
Bryan Bartlett
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5102dd06e1c8ff994aa73fae|5102dce9e1c8ff994aa73f86

Pages

4:00am

Wed April 27, 2011
Energy

Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster Has Lessons For Japan

Steve Inskeep examines how lessons from Chernobyl apply to the nuclear accident in Japan. He talks to nuclear energy expert Matthew Bunn at Harvard's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs.

4:00am

Wed April 27, 2011
Politics

Rep. Giffords Recovery Milestone: Shuttle Launch

Rep. Gabrielle Giffords will be in Florida Friday to watch the final launch of the space shuttle Endeavor. Her husband, astronaut Mark Kelly, is commanding the mission. Giffords hasn't spoken publicly since Jan. 8 when a gunman shot her in the head at a constituent event. Jaimee Rose, of The Arizona Republic, tells Steve Inskeep why doctors think a trip away from the Houston rehabilitation center is good for her recovery.

4:00am

Wed April 27, 2011
Europe

England's Las Vegas Awaits Royal Wedding Day

Britain's Royal Wedding is the biggest national celebration in 30 years. Prince William marries Kate Middleton on Friday and the British are planning a big party. Blackpool is in England's north, and residents there embrace a good party.

3:54pm

Tue April 26, 2011
Opinion

Couric's Farewell Isn't The End: How To Save News

Eric Deggans is TV and media critic for the St. Petersburg Times.

Katie Couric announced today that she was leaving her post at CBS Evening News, and would be looking for a job that will allow her to "engage in more multi-dimensional storytelling." There are plenty of commentators who say this is another nail in the coffin for traditional newscasts.

Uncool as it sounds, I'll be the guy to say it out loud: the old school network evening newscast still has value. It should be saved.

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11:02am

Tue April 26, 2011
Business

Ford Reports Best 1st-Quarter Profit In 13 Years

The automaker said Tuesday that net income rose to about $2.5 billion, up from $2 billion in the same quarter last year and its best first-quarter performance since 1998. Ford sold plenty of F-series pickup trucks and Explorer SUVs. But unlike in the past, when big gas-guzzlers were cash cows for American automakers, it's Ford's smaller, fuel-efficient cars that are driving its earnings.

7:37am

Tue April 26, 2011
Europe

Odds Are Bookies Are Taking Royal Wedding Bets

The royal wedding's a national holiday in the UK, but bookies aren't taking the day off. Gambling sites such as Bodog are taking bets ranging from the color of the Queen's hat — yellow's the favorite at 2 to 1 — to which guests will cry during the ceremony.

7:32am

Tue April 26, 2011
Around the Nation

Police Follow Facebook Posts To Track Robbers

Police in Texas had an easy time investigating a bank robbery. Someone robbed the International Bank of Commerce in Houston. They wore masks but afterward, police found evidence it was an inside job. A teller's boyfriend posted he was "wiping his teeth with hundreds."

4:00am

Tue April 26, 2011
Middle East

Syrian Troops Converge On Daraa, Where Protests Began

Syrian troops in armored vehicles and tanks stormed the southern city of Daraa and opened fire Monday. Borzou Daragahi, Middle East correspondent for the Los Angeles Times, talks to Steve Inskeep about the crack down on protesters.

4:00am

Tue April 26, 2011
Author Interviews

ElBaradei Looks Back On IAEA, Ahead On Egyptian Politics

Steve Inskeep talks to Mohamed El Baradei about his political ambitions in Egypt and his new book: "The Age of Deception" — Nuclear Diplomacy in Treacherous Times. El Baradei is running for president in Egypt and is the former head of the International Atomic Energy Agency.

4:00am

Tue April 26, 2011
Law

Supreme Court Won't Expedite Health Care Challenge

The Supreme Court won't fast-track a challenge to the constitutionality of the 2010 health care law. The challenge was filed by the state of Virginia and its attorney general. The case will be heard in the appeals courts instead — though it still could reach the high court before the 2012 elections.

4:00am

Tue April 26, 2011
Law

Under Pressure, Firm Drops DOMA Defense

The law firm hired by House Republicans to defend the Defense of Marriage Act has resigned the case. The Atlanta firm King & Spalding was under pressure from gay rights advocates. One of its partners, former U.S. Solicitor General Paul Clement, is leaving the firm to defend DOMA himself.

4:00am

Tue April 26, 2011
Around the Nation

Vermont Legislature Tackles Single-Payer Health Bill

The Vermont Senate has given preliminary approval to a health care initiative that puts the state on a path to become the first in the country to adopt a single-payer system. Critics say the legislation could drive physicians out of state, limit patient choice and raise taxes. Once the Senate's action is complete, the measure goes back to the House.

7:17am

Mon April 25, 2011
Europe

Beer Banned From Royal Wedding Reception

Guests at the upcoming wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton may be disappointed to hear: No beer will be served. The Daily Mirror reports beer has been banned from the reception. Champagne and wine will be served instead of beer.

7:11am

Mon April 25, 2011
Strange News

Computer Glitch Opens Closed Grocery's Doors

On Good Friday, a computer problem affected the security system of a New Zealand supermarket. The store was supposed to be closed for the holiday, but the computer turned on the lights and unlocked the doors. Police were called after witnesses saw people helping themselves to "truck loads" of groceries.

4:58am

Mon April 25, 2011
Europe

In England, Cornwall Pays No Mind To Royal Wedding

Prince William, who's second in line to the British throne, is marrying Kate Middleton on Friday. The images and voices that will fill the airwaves that day will portray a kingdom full of loyal and joyous subjects. But in Cornwall, where the map says it is part of England, they don't feel very English.

4:00am

Mon April 25, 2011
Middle East

Syria Cracks Down On Demonstrators

Security forces in Syria are cracking down on opponents of President Bashar Assad's regime. Steve Inskeep talks to NPR's Deborah Amos about the latest news out of Syria.

4:00am

Mon April 25, 2011
Business

Business News

Steve Inskeep has business news.

4:00am

Mon April 25, 2011
Middle East

Yemen's Saleh Wants Immunity Before Stepping Down

Originally published on Mon April 25, 2011 7:55 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Now many of those Guantanamo detainees are from Yemen, a country we'll talk about next. It's facing a major political transition. Yemen's president Ali Abdullah Saleh has been in power for more than three decades and is considered and important U.S. ally in the battle against al-Qaida. But after widespread protests against his rule, he now says he is willing to step down within a month if he and his family are granted immunity from prosecution.

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12:01am

Mon April 25, 2011
Theater

For Ben Stiller, 'House Of Blue Leaves' Is Home

Police barriers have been put up by many Broadway stage doors recently to control crowds who want to catch a glimpse of some of the Hollywood stars who are appearing in shows: A-list names like Kiefer Sutherland, Daniel Radcliffe and Chris Rock, among them. Monday night, you can add three more names to that list: Ben Stiller, Edie Falco and Jennifer Jason Leigh are all opening in a revival of John Guare's play, The House of Blue Leaves.

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8:08am

Fri April 22, 2011
Africa

U.S. Drones Join Fight To Oust Libya's Gadhafi

The war in Libya is "moving towards a stalemate," according to Admiral Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. To try to break that stalemate, the Pentagon has announced that armed U.S. drones will be joining the fight to help rebels in their effort to oust Moammar Gadhafi.

7:20am

Fri April 22, 2011
Around the Nation

Nebraska's Sally Gordon To Retire At 102

Originally published on Fri April 22, 2011 8:08 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

Nebraska's assistant sergeant-in-arms will work her last day on Tuesday. 102-year-old Sally Gordon told the Lincoln Journal Star she wants to retire while she's still young. She often walks seven blocks to work where she passes messages to lawmakers and keeps order in the chambers. Still beautiful, the former model is known for her stylish hats at the state capitol - a building that Sally Gordon watched being built in 1922.

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7:13am

Fri April 22, 2011
Asia

Chinese Man To Pay To Look Like Shakespeare

To be or not to be — William Shakespeare. According to China National Radio, a best-selling author plans to shell out more than $150,000 for plastic surgery to transform himself into Shakespeare's spitting image.

6:29am

Fri April 22, 2011
Technology

Google Tweak's Algorithm To Spot 'Content Farms'

How-to content on the Internet has become popular and profitable. Google recently changed its search algorithm because it didn't like the glut of sites that show up every time you search how to do something.

4:00am

Fri April 22, 2011
Politics

Rep. Meehan Defends Budget Vote To Constituents

Congress left town a week ago having settled one budget fight that keeps the government funded until October. But more epic battles are in store when lawmakers get back early next month. In the meantime, some are holding town hall meetings in their districts to hear from constituents and defend recent votes. NPR's David Welna went to the southeastern corner of Pennsylvania this week, where he found freshman GOP Rep. Pat Meehan doing five town halls in one day.

4:00am

Fri April 22, 2011
Law

Torture Trial Starts For Salvadoran In Florida

In a courtroom in Orlando, Fla., Friday, an immigration hearing resumes that involves a former top Salvadoran military official. Gen. Eugenio Vides Casanova faces possible deportation. He's charged with participating in torture and human rights abuses in El Salvador nearly 30 years ago.

4:00am

Fri April 22, 2011
Business

Business News

Mary Louise Kelly has business news.

12:01am

Fri April 22, 2011
Monkey See

A New 'Doctor Who' Tries To Make Peace With Its Impatient Stateside Fans

It's a problem that might baffle even the intrepid Doctor Who: how to dissuade the show's devoted fans from downloading it illegally.

Those fans span generations — from those who remember the cult-y British science fiction show as a rickety affair, with visible zippers in costumes and esoteric plotlines, to newer converts impressed by the slick, accessible and very funny new reboot starring Matt Smith as the eleventh incarnation of the Time Lord, who scoots around the space-time continuum by way of a bright blue police call box.

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12:01am

Fri April 22, 2011
Your Money

Late-Shift Worker's Lament: 'It's Killing Me'

Sleep deprivation has been in the news this week — it's a particular problem for air traffic controllers, who often work long graveyard shifts. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, about 15 percent of Americans do some type of shift work.

A request on NPR's Facebook page asking people to share their own stories of working on the night shift brought more than 2,000 responses.

We talked to some of those folks to learn more — and below, you can find some of the comments they wrote in response to our Facebook post.

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12:01am

Fri April 22, 2011
Author Interviews

'Selfish Reasons' For Parents To Enjoy Having Kids

Originally published on Thu July 14, 2011 8:30 pm

The long-term effects of parenting aren't proven, says author Bryan Caplan, seen here with his family.
Emily Korff Veralana Photography

An economics professor has a plan for raising children: have lots of them, and don't stress about nurturing their potential. Bryan Caplan, author of the book Selfish Reasons to Have More Kids, says that a child is helped the most if they are in a positive atmosphere.

And if they follow that step, Caplan says, parents can relax — and focus on having even more children. Caplan, who teaches at George Mason University, has three children himself — twin 8-year-olds and an infant.

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12:01am

Fri April 22, 2011
Author Interviews

'Crossing State Lines': 54 Writers, One American Poem

This year, National Poetry Month brings an ambitious collaboration: a cross-country relay race of 54 poets contributing to one poem about America. The practice is known as renga, an ancient Japanese tradition of collaborative poetry in which one poet writes their lines then hands it off to the next.

The resulting poem, Crossing State Lines: An American Renga, was co-curated by California Poet Laureate Carol Muske-Dukes.

Muske-Dukes tells NPR's Renee Montagne that a poetry relay race was no easy task.

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