Morning Edition on WEKU

Weekdays 5-9am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

Local Anchor(s): 
Stu Johnson
Local Host(s): 
Bryan Bartlett
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5102dd06e1c8ff994aa73fae|5102dce9e1c8ff994aa73f86

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4:00am

Fri April 29, 2011
NPR Story

Tornado Outbreak Leaves Wide Path Of Destruction

Communities in the South are cleaning up after tornadoes hit the region hard. Alabama is suffering the most. Search and rescue teams are going door to door to find victims.

4:00am

Fri April 29, 2011
Business

The Last Word In Business

Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne have today's Last Word in business.

4:00am

Fri April 29, 2011
Around the Nation

Americans Host Their Own Royal Wedding Festivities

Across our country, people are hosting royal wedding parties. Of course they had to get up pretty early to make it happen.

4:00am

Fri April 29, 2011
Europe

Kate Middleton To Marry Her Prince

Britain's royal wedding has been planned like a military operation. Renee Montagne talks to NPR's Philip Reeves, who is monitoring the ceremony.

4:00am

Fri April 29, 2011
Around the Nation

Obama To Tour Alabama's Tornado Damage

In Alabama Friday, President Obama and the first lady will meet with families whose homes were destroyed by tornadoes. Gov. Robert Bentley will show the Obamas storm damage as search and rescue crews keep looking for survivors.

12:01am

Fri April 29, 2011
StoryCorps

'The Kissing Case' And The Lives It Shattered

In 1958, James Hanover Thompson and his friend David Simpson — both African-American, both children — were accused of kissing a girl who was white. They were arrested, and taken to jail. Prosecutors sought a stiff penalty — living in reform school until they were 21.

"The Kissing Case," as it came to be known, drew international media attention at the time. But since then, it's been largely forgotten. Even the Thompson family rarely talked about it. Recently, James Hanover Thompson sat down with his younger brother, Dwight, and told him what happened.

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8:40am

Thu April 28, 2011
Around the Nation

Vicious Storm Hits Neighborhood In Birmingham, Ala.

Rescue crews are searching through a neighborhood of Birmingham, Ala., looking for survivors from a power storm. Mayor William Bell tells Steve Inskeep houses, churches and businesses are "just gone."

7:57am

Thu April 28, 2011
Around the Nation

Suspect Gets Away While Handcuffed To A Chair

Police in Buffalo, New York, had handcuffed their suspect to a chair as they questioned him. The left him alone for a moment. When they came back, both the suspect and the chair were gone.

7:42am

Thu April 28, 2011
Pop Culture

Superman Gives Up His U.S. Citizenship

In Action Comics latest issue, Superman proclaims himself a citizen of the universe after clashing with the U.S. government. Which puts rather a dent in his longtime motto: Truth, justice and the American way.

4:00am

Thu April 28, 2011
Around the Nation

Deadly Storms Ravage The South, Alabama Hit Hard

Ferocious storms ravaged the South — pounding several states from Mississippi to Georgia Wednesday. The worst hit state was Alabama, where a massive tornado ripped through Tuscaloosa.

4:00am

Thu April 28, 2011
Africa

Fighting Persists In Besieged Libyan City Of Misrata

Renee Montagne talks with Marie Colvin, of the Sunday Times of London, about the situation in Misrata, Libya. Misrata has been a flash point for fighting between rebels and forces loyal to Gadhafi.

4:00am

Thu April 28, 2011
National Security

Obama To Announce New National Security Team

The White House has been planning to reshuffle its national security line up for months, and it is expected to announce the new team Thursday. The changes have been driven by the planned retirement of Defense Secretary Robert Gates.

4:00am

Thu April 28, 2011
NPR Story

Bernanke Expects Jobs Market To Strengthen

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke yesterday conducted the first full-fledged news conference ever by a Fed chairman. NPR's John Ydstie reports.

4:00am

Thu April 28, 2011
NPR Story

Obama Releases Certificate To End 'Birther' Controversy

President Obama released the long-form version of his birth certificate Wednesday. He's hoping to quiet lingering questions about his nationality. The questions were re-kindled in recent weeks by Donald Trump. The president warned Americans not to get distracted by what he calls "sideshows" and "carnival barkers." NPR's Scott Horsley reports.

12:01am

Thu April 28, 2011
Author Interviews

Hisham Matar On The Power Of Libyan Fiction

For decades, Libya's political environment has been brutal and repressive, and that has trickled into many aspects of daily life, including its culture and its literature. Hisham Matar, a Booker Prize-nominated author for In the Country of Men, says that amazingly, Libyan literature had a kind of golden the early seventies just after Moammar Gadhafi came to power. For a brief time, Gadhafi was seen as a liberator, and he inspired hope in people in all arenas — from business to art.

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12:01am

Thu April 28, 2011
Pop Culture

PR's 'Gay Guru' Helps Celebrities Come Out

Growing up in the Midwest during the 1960s, Howard Bragman was fairly convinced he was an alien.

"I was fat and Jewish and gay in Flint, Mich.," he says, "and that makes you a bit of a Martian because there's not a lot of peers, there's not a lot of role models to really look to."

Today, Bragman has made a name for himself in Hollywood as the go-to publicist for helping celebrities come out of the closet — they call him the "gay guru."

Bragman says he sees his work as a way to create the role models he never had growing up.

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12:35pm

Wed April 27, 2011
U.S.

Obama Answers Birthers By Showing His Certificate

President Obama released his long-form birth certificate Wednesday in an effort to quiet GOP accusations that he was not born in the United States. Steve Inskeep talks to NPR's Scott Horsley at the White House.

7:42am

Wed April 27, 2011
Around the Nation

Royal Confusion Over Kate Middleton's Name

A Boston area woman set up a Facebook account with the same name of the bride in this week's royal wedding. Facebook suspended her account for using a fake name. The trouble is, the woman in Concord really is named Kate Middleton. It took her a week to recover her online identity.

7:30am

Wed April 27, 2011
Around the Nation

Roger Ebert Wins 'New Yorker' Caption Contest

The New Yorker magazine is famous for its cartoons, and it holds a regular contest inviting readers to send in captions. The latest winner is Roger Ebert of Chicago. The movie critic has been trying to win for years. The magazine says Ebert won after submitting contest entries 107 times.

4:00am

Wed April 27, 2011
Politics

Rep. Giffords Recovery Milestone: Shuttle Launch

Rep. Gabrielle Giffords will be in Florida Friday to watch the final launch of the space shuttle Endeavor. Her husband, astronaut Mark Kelly, is commanding the mission. Giffords hasn't spoken publicly since Jan. 8 when a gunman shot her in the head at a constituent event. Jaimee Rose, of The Arizona Republic, tells Steve Inskeep why doctors think a trip away from the Houston rehabilitation center is good for her recovery.

4:00am

Wed April 27, 2011
Europe

England's Las Vegas Awaits Royal Wedding Day

Britain's Royal Wedding is the biggest national celebration in 30 years. Prince William marries Kate Middleton on Friday and the British are planning a big party. Blackpool is in England's north, and residents there embrace a good party.

4:00am

Wed April 27, 2011
Politics

Rep. Webster Defends GOP Plan To Change Medicare

Florida freshman Rep. Daniel Webster bucked the Tea Party line recently and voted to support the House spending deal pushed by Speaker John Boehner. Days later, the Republican also voted to support a GOP plan to privatize Medicare — an issue of special interest to Florida seniors.

4:00am

Wed April 27, 2011
Middle East

Protests Disrupt Syria's Power Structure

Morning Edition takes a step back from the news to take a look at the history of Syria, which has been ruled for 40 years by the Assad family. In spite of a British education and promises of change, when the strongman's son, Bashar al-Assad, came to power in 2000, he turned out to be more like his father than the West had hoped. Syria expert Joshua Landis talks to Steve Inskeep about how loyalty defines the Assad family's rule.

4:00am

Wed April 27, 2011
Energy

Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster Has Lessons For Japan

Steve Inskeep examines how lessons from Chernobyl apply to the nuclear accident in Japan. He talks to nuclear energy expert Matthew Bunn at Harvard's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs.

3:54pm

Tue April 26, 2011
Opinion

Couric's Farewell Isn't The End: How To Save News

Eric Deggans is TV and media critic for the St. Petersburg Times.

Katie Couric announced today that she was leaving her post at CBS Evening News, and would be looking for a job that will allow her to "engage in more multi-dimensional storytelling." There are plenty of commentators who say this is another nail in the coffin for traditional newscasts.

Uncool as it sounds, I'll be the guy to say it out loud: the old school network evening newscast still has value. It should be saved.

Read more

11:02am

Tue April 26, 2011
Business

Ford Reports Best 1st-Quarter Profit In 13 Years

The automaker said Tuesday that net income rose to about $2.5 billion, up from $2 billion in the same quarter last year and its best first-quarter performance since 1998. Ford sold plenty of F-series pickup trucks and Explorer SUVs. But unlike in the past, when big gas-guzzlers were cash cows for American automakers, it's Ford's smaller, fuel-efficient cars that are driving its earnings.

7:37am

Tue April 26, 2011
Europe

Odds Are Bookies Are Taking Royal Wedding Bets

The royal wedding's a national holiday in the UK, but bookies aren't taking the day off. Gambling sites such as Bodog are taking bets ranging from the color of the Queen's hat — yellow's the favorite at 2 to 1 — to which guests will cry during the ceremony.

7:32am

Tue April 26, 2011
Around the Nation

Police Follow Facebook Posts To Track Robbers

Police in Texas had an easy time investigating a bank robbery. Someone robbed the International Bank of Commerce in Houston. They wore masks but afterward, police found evidence it was an inside job. A teller's boyfriend posted he was "wiping his teeth with hundreds."

4:00am

Tue April 26, 2011
Middle East

Syrian Troops Converge On Daraa, Where Protests Began

Syrian troops in armored vehicles and tanks stormed the southern city of Daraa and opened fire Monday. Borzou Daragahi, Middle East correspondent for the Los Angeles Times, talks to Steve Inskeep about the crack down on protesters.

4:00am

Tue April 26, 2011
Author Interviews

ElBaradei Looks Back On IAEA, Ahead On Egyptian Politics

Steve Inskeep talks to Mohamed El Baradei about his political ambitions in Egypt and his new book: "The Age of Deception" — Nuclear Diplomacy in Treacherous Times. El Baradei is running for president in Egypt and is the former head of the International Atomic Energy Agency.

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