Morning Edition on WEKU

Weekdays 5-9am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

Local Anchor(s): 
Stu Johnson
Local Host(s): 
Bryan Bartlett
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5102dd06e1c8ff994aa73fae|5102dce9e1c8ff994aa73f86

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4:00am

Tue June 28, 2011
Business

Business News

Protesters in Greece are demonstrating against government plans to slash the national budget, raise taxes and sell-off state assets. The prime minister is trying to get another austerity plan though parliament this week.

4:00am

Tue June 28, 2011
Business

The Last Word In Business

Renee Montagne has the Last Word in business.

12:01am

Tue June 28, 2011
Author Interviews

An 'Untold Story': What If Princess Diana Survived?

Princess Diana died on Aug. 30, 1997 in a Paris car crash after trying to escape from the paparazzi.
Princess Diana Archive Getty Images

In 2003, Writer Monica Ali made a literary splash with a debut novel, Brick Lane, about a young immigrant woman who longs for home. Today, Ali is once again attracting attention — this time with a novel about a world-famous royal trying to get as far away from home as possible.

In Untold Story, Ali imagines what might have happened if Princess Diana had survived that 1997 car crash in Paris — and then gone on to fake her own death.

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8:01am

Mon June 27, 2011
Business

Michael Jackson Items Popular At Music Icon Auction

Michael Jackson's famous red and black jacket from the video Thriller fetched $1.8 million. His crystal-covered glove went for more than $300,000.

7:55am

Mon June 27, 2011
Around the Nation

Wounded Afghan Vet Catches Ball At Yankee Stadium

Michael Kacer lost his left arm in a rocket attack in Afghanistan. But he still has one good arm, and he demonstrated how good at Yankee Stadium Friday night. He was in the stands when a foul ball spun his way. Kacer reached over the railing and snatched the ball with his hat.

6:48am

Mon June 27, 2011
Africa

Mozambique Tries To Address Doctor Shortage

NPR's All Things Considered launches a series of stories that will run through the summer about pregnancy and childbirth. The series is called "Beginnings," and it starts with a visit to the sub-Saharan African country of Mozambique.

6:37am

Mon June 27, 2011
Africa

Sub-Saharan Africa Adopts Circumcision Program

Four years ago, the World Health Organization determined medical circumcision reduces a man's likelihood of contracting HIV by 60 percent. Since then, large-scale circumcision programs have been growing slowly in sub-Saharan Africa. Two-thirds of the world's HIV positive people live there.

6:30am

Mon June 27, 2011
Middle East

Syria Allows Reporters To Travel To 'Massacre' Site

Syria's government has finally allowed a small group of western journalists into the country. They were allowed to travel to Jisr al Shughour, where Syrian officials say armed gangs staged a massacre. More than 300 soldiers and security personnel were killed.

6:24am

Mon June 27, 2011
Economy

Obama Turns His Attention To Deficit Reduction

After weeks of leaving deficit-reduction talks to Vice President Biden, President Obama will meet personally with Republican and Democratic leaders of the Senate. They're trying to work out a plan to stem the tide of red ink. But no matter what happens, the government will need to keep borrowing money. And that means lawmakers will need to raise the federal debt ceiling within the next five weeks.

4:00am

Mon June 27, 2011
Asia

Shehrbano Taseer Recalls Her Father's Assassination

Earlier this year in Pakistan, the governor of Punjab province, who was an outspoken defender of civil rights, was gunned down. His daughter, Shehrbano Taseer, is a journalist in Pakistan, and she talks to Steve Inskeep about her father's legacy and her own fight against extremism.

4:00am

Mon June 27, 2011
Business

Business News

Steve Inskeep has business news.

4:00am

Mon June 27, 2011
Business

1 Man Does It Fast, Cheaper Than Big Pharma

Drug companies aren't the only ones making money inventing new medicines for the market. A man in Massachusetts has brought three drugs to market almost on his own. His process is the same as the big drug makers, but he farms out each aspect of the process to independent labs and specialists. When the drug starts to succeed in trials, he sells it to one of the big companies. Curt Nickisch of member station WBUR reports.

4:00am

Mon June 27, 2011
Business

The Last Word In Business

Steve Inskeep has the Last Word in business.

12:01am

Mon June 27, 2011
Science

In Old Age, Illness And Dying Can Be Postponed

Dr. Mark Lachs says his older patients are like reliable cars. After a certain age, they are less likely to break down, and just keep rolling right along.
Adrian Kinloch

Gerontologist and commentator Mark Lachs says research in aging shows that once people reach a certain age, rates of disease, disability, and death start to decline.

I have a 98-year-old patient who's not only independent but rather dashing. He recently asked a series of questions that reminded me of one of the most intriguing scientific papers in gerontology.

Is it okay if he has a little cheese and butter from time to time? In modest amounts, he assured me.

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7:23am

Fri June 24, 2011
Around the Nation

Fan Tells Brewers Star To Go Fly A Kite

Baseball star Nyjer Morgan of the Milwaukee Brewers sent a tweet to followers asking, "Wat should ur boy do today?" A follower replied, "Fly a kite!" Morgan stood up, went outside and actually flew one.

7:17am

Fri June 24, 2011
Around the Nation

Summertime Prankers Hit The Streets

Drivers in Kentucky were the latest to see an electronic alert on an interstate warning of zombies ahead. And, the manager of Legoland discovered his car had been replaced with a life-sized replica made of 200,000 Legos.

7:01am

Fri June 24, 2011
Middle East

Syrian, Turkish Troops Mass At Shared Border

Washington is calling on Syria to remove its troops from the border with Turkey. Aid officials say hundreds of Syrians fled makeshift camps into southeastern Turkey as the military approached.

Ankara doesn't want to lose its economic engagement with Syria, but nonetheless is shifting its rhetoric in support of the people demanding more freedoms.

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6:39am

Fri June 24, 2011
Around the Nation

New Jersey Legislature Approves Cuts In Benefits

State lawmakers have approved deep cuts in benefits for government workers and retirees in New Jersey. State and local workers will have to contribute more to their health insurance and pension plans. And they'll lose collective bargaining rights over health benefits.

4:00am

Fri June 24, 2011
NPR Story

Troop Drawdown Could Bolster Obama's Election Chances

During the last presidential campaign, the war in Iraq was the most important foreign issue. Now that President Obama has pulled combat troops out of Iraq, another campaign season is here, and Afghanistan has the spotlight. How will the plan Obama announced this week for a troop drawdown influence the presidential race?

4:00am

Fri June 24, 2011
Business

Business News

Steve Inskeep has business news.

4:00am

Fri June 24, 2011
Movies

'Cars 2' Uses 3D Better Than Most Live Action Films

It's the 25th anniversary of Pixar Animation and the studio is marking the occasion with a new Cars film. The original came out five years ago and was very successful. Cars 2 is so close to the heart of John Lasseter that he carved out time from being the creative czar of both Pixar and Disney animation to direct it himself.

4:00am

Fri June 24, 2011
Business

Obama Releases Oil Reserves To Counter Lost Crude

Originally published on Fri June 24, 2011 7:01 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

And you can expect lower gas prices this summer. One reason: The White House is tapping the nation's Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Over the next month, the administration will sell 30 million barrels of government oil.

NPR's Jeff Brady has more.

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4:00am

Fri June 24, 2011
Business

The Last Word In Business

Renee Montagne has the Last Word in business.

4:00am

Fri June 24, 2011
Politics

GOP Leaves Talks On Raising Federal Debt Ceiling

The Obama administration has set a hard deadline of August 2 for Congress to come up with a deal and pass it into law. But the parties hit a stalemate on the issue of taxes.

4:00am

Fri June 24, 2011
Law

Drug Industry Wins In 2 Supreme Court Rulings

The U.S. Supreme Court handed the pharmaceutical industry two major victories on Thursday.

4:00am

Fri June 24, 2011
Business

China Hopes To Stand Out At Paris Air Show

China is making its presence known at this year's Paris Air Show. It is the premier event for those who make and buy aircraft. And China is there as one of the world's largest purchaser of jetliners. It is also trying to make its mark as a manufacturer. Eleanor Beardsley reports.

4:00am

Fri June 24, 2011
Afghanistan

U.S. Troop Drawdown Shouldn't Hurt Aid Work

The U.S. Agency for International Development is going to have to do more with less as it faces serious budget cuts. USAID Administrator Rajiv Shah talks to Renee Montagne about what the troop drawdown in Afghanistan will mean for U.S. assistance for Afghanistan.

4:00am

Fri June 24, 2011
National Security

Army Gen. Petreaus Would Retire To Head CIA

President Obama's nominee to head the CIA was on Capitol Hill Thursday for a confirmation hearing. The Senate Intelligence Committee asked Gen. David Petraeus about many things, including Obama's decision to withdraw troops from Afghanistan. Petreaus also told the panel that to do the CIA job properly, he would retire from the Army.

12:01am

Fri June 24, 2011
Latin America

Rise Of Indigenous Actress Marks Change In Peru

Magaly Solier stars in The Milk of Sorrow, which won the Golden Bear award for best film at the 2009 Berlin Film Festival. It's the first Peruvian film the festival has ever featured.
Valery Hache AFP/Getty Images

In 2009, when the Peruvian film The Milk of Sorrow won top honors at the Berlin Film Festival, lead actress Magaly Solier did something surprising — she chose to accept the award by singing a song in Quechua, a common indigenous language of Peru.

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10:00pm

Thu June 23, 2011
StoryCorps

The Teacher Learns A Lesson: Coming Out In Class

Teacher John Byrne talked about coming out to his 10th-grade English class with a former student, Samantha Liebman, in New York City.
StoryCorps

As a high school teacher at Friends Seminary in New York, John Byrne has taught hundreds of students. Recently, he spoke with a former student, Samantha Liebman, about the years before he became the teacher he is today. For one thing, his classrooms were very regimented.

"I would make the kids line up before they came into class," he says, "and then they would stand by their desks and I would say, 'You may sit down when I sit down.' They said, 'Good morning, Mr. Byrne.'

"I was very strict, because I was afraid the kids would discover I was gay," he says.

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