Morning Edition on WEKU

Weekdays 5-9am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

Local Anchor(s): 
Stu Johnson
Local Host(s): 
Bryan Bartlett
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5102dd06e1c8ff994aa73fae|5102dce9e1c8ff994aa73f86

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4:00am

Thu July 14, 2011
Media

Murdoch's News Corp. Still In Damage Control Mode

Rupert Murdoch's media company has been under fire for a phone-hacking scandal in Britain. On Wednesday, News Corp. announced it was withdrawing a bid to buy full interest in the British broadcast company BSkyB. Murdoch has suffered a stunning loss of political influence in Britain.

4:00am

Thu July 14, 2011
Media

Will News Corp.'s Scandal Spread To The U.S.?

The phone-hacking charges involving Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. has mostly been a British scandal. But the tentacles of his empire extend far beyond Britain. Ken Auletta, media writer for The New Yorker, talks to Mary Louise Kelly about the scope of the News Corp. media empire.

12:01am

Thu July 14, 2011
The End Of The Space Shuttle Era

Out Of This World: Designs Of The Space Age

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:40 am

Unidentified Fashion Object: A 1963 rendering shows the design for Biff's Coffee Shop in Oakland, Calif. "It almost looked like a flying saucer," says Victor Newlove of Armet Davis Newlove Architects. "It looks like it's about ready to lift off."
Armet & Davis Architects

The Space Age left a sleekly modern mark on everything from office parks to kitchenware to kids' TV shows like The Jetsons. Even today, if you drive around Los Angeles, you'll see relics of Space Age architecture, including the flamboyantly futuristic Los Angeles International Airport and a nearby coffee shop called Pann's.

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10:38am

Wed July 13, 2011
Business

Murdoch's News Corp. Withdraws BSkyB Bid

Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. announced Wednesday that it has withdrawn its bid for BSkyB, a major U.K. broadcaster. Murdoch is embroiled in a phone hacking scandal involving the tabloid News of the World, which News Corp. shut down last week. Steve Inskeep talks about the announcement with NPR's David Folkenflik in London.

7:34am

Wed July 13, 2011
Around the Nation

Mistake Found In North Dakota's Constitution

North Dakota became a state in 1889. Now, 122 years later, a flaw has been found in the state's constitution. Historian John Rolcynski noticed it doesn't say the governor has to take an oath of office, as required by Article VI of the U.S. Constitution.

7:29am

Wed July 13, 2011
Around the Nation

Man Jailed For Pelting Flight Attendant With Snacks

A passenger on a Southwest Airlines plane tried to use a new electronic cigarette on a flight from Los Angeles to Utah. Told to stop, he allegedly got so mad he pelted the flight attendant with peanuts and pretzels.

6:46am

Wed July 13, 2011
Animals

South Dakota's Well-Loved Tortoise Dies At 130

Methuselah, a giant tortoise whose life began in the Galapagos Islands 130 years ago, has died in Rapid City, South Dakota. Since 1954, the huge animal was the star attraction at Reptile Gardens.

6:39am

Wed July 13, 2011
Remembrances

'Brady Bunch,' 'Gilligan's Island' Creator Dies

Sherwood Schwartz, who created The Brady Bunch and Gilligan's Island, was veteran comedy writer. He was 94.

5:55am

Wed July 13, 2011
Asia

CIA Schemed To Get DNA Of Osama Bin Laden's Kids

The British newspaper the Guardian reports the CIA recruited a Pakistani doctor to set up a fake vaccination program in the town where Osama bin Laden was living. The idea was to obtain a DNA sample from one of bin Laden's children.

4:00am

Wed July 13, 2011
NPR Story

Partisan Rancor Heats Up In Debt-Ceiling Talks

Deficit-cutting negotiations continue with little apparent progress. Time is running short to raise the government's debt limit so lawmakers are beginning to consider alternatives, in case no deal is made.

4:00am

Wed July 13, 2011
NPR Story

Rebekah Brooks Survives Phone-Hacking Scandal

At the heart of the phone-hacking scandal threatening Rupert Murdoch's empire, is a woman who's been described as a "tough social climber" with "long flame-red hair." The woman is Rebekah Brooks, head of the British arm of News Corp. Andy McSmith wrote a profile of Brooks for Britain's "Independent" newspaper, and he talks to Mary Louise Kelly about it.

4:00am

Wed July 13, 2011
NPR Story

Netflix Announces Price Increase

Netflix is raising its prices. The company will separate DVDs-by-mail and streaming into two separate services. It will also raise the price on bundling the two services together.

4:00am

Wed July 13, 2011
Media

How News Corp. Received Billions In Tax Refunds

As British investigators dig for details in the News Corp. scandal, a columnist for the Reuters news service looked at figures that were already public. News Corp. is a publicly-traded company in the U.S., meaning it must disclose its finances here. So columnist David Cay Johnston ran those numbers — how much News Corp. made in the last four years and the taxes paid. Johnston talks to Steve Inskeep about his investigation.

4:00am

Wed July 13, 2011
Remembrances

Betty Ford Remember At Calif. Service

Former First Lady Betty Ford is being laid to rest in Michigan Thursday. Her funeral was held Tuesday in Palm Desert, California. Among the speakers were former first lady Rosalyn Carter and the head of the Betty Ford Clinic.

4:00am

Wed July 13, 2011
Business

Business News

Steve Inskeep has business news.

4:00am

Wed July 13, 2011
Business

Rhode Island City Starts Fiscal Year In The Red

The Rhode Island city of Central Falls is sliding closer into bankruptcy. The state won't give the cash-strapped city money to pay its bills for the fiscal year that just ended, and the city is entering the new fiscal year nearly five million dollars in the hole. Catherine Welch of member station WRNI reports

4:00am

Wed July 13, 2011
Business

The Last Word In Business

Mary Louise Kelly has the Last Word in business.

12:01am

Wed July 13, 2011
Author Interviews

For 'Stanton,' All Women Were Not Created Equal

Lori Ginzberg is a professor of history and women's studies at Penn State University. Elizabeth Cady Stanton is her sixth book.
Ken Yanoviak

Much of America as we know it evolved in the 19th century, as we'll explore in a series of three conversations this week with writers who seek out new ways to understand old events.

In 1979, 19th-century activist Susan B. Anthony became the first woman to appear on a circulating United States coin. Anthony is remembered for her work in fighting for women's right to vote, but it was her friend Elizabeth Cady Stanton who actually launched the women's rights movement. She, however, never got a coin.

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11:00pm

Tue July 12, 2011
Planet Money

How Frequent Fliers Exploit A Government Program To Get Free Trips

Originally published on Wed July 13, 2011 12:01 am

Jane Liaw Liaw orders coins from the U.S. Mint to earn frequent-flier miles.
Jane Liaw

We recently reported on the the government's failed effort to persuade Americans to use dollar coins.

But the coins have found at least one group of fans: Travel enthusiasts who buy thousands of dollar coins with credit cards that award frequent-flier miles for purchases.

Once in possession of the coins — shipped to them by the government for free — they can deposit them into their bank accounts and pay off the credit card bills. The result: a free ticket to anywhere.

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7:36am

Tue July 12, 2011
Media

'Financial Times' Misspells Rupert Murdoch's Name

Media magnate Rupert Murdoch has been in the news a lot lately. Despite that fact, the Financial Times spelled his last name Murdock.

7:29am

Tue July 12, 2011
Europe

Blueprints Are Missing For Germany's New Spy HQ

Germany is investigating whether blueprints for the new headquarters of the country's intelligence agency, the BND, have gone missing. The building's under construction in Berlin. According to Germany's Focus magazine, the missing blueprints detail the alarm system, emergency exits and anti-terror installations.

5:21am

Tue July 12, 2011
Afghanistan

Karzai's Half-Brother Assassinated In Kandahar

In Afghanistan, the half-brother of President Hamid Karzai was assassinated at his home in the southern part of the country, in the city of Kandahar Tuesday. Ahmed Wali Karzai was repeatedly accused of corruption and of having links to drug trafficking, yet the Afghan president continued to defend him.

4:00am

Tue July 12, 2011
Economy

Why GOP Lawmakers Wouldn't Accept 'Grand Bargain'

Over the weekend, House Speaker John Boehner bowed out of the so-called "grand bargain" bipartisan debt-reduction deal. Steve Inskeep talks with Republican Rep. Dave Camp of Michigan about why pressure mounted on Boehner to walk away from the compromise.

4:00am

Tue July 12, 2011
Business

E.U. Worries Debt Crisis Will Spread To Italy, Spain

In Europe, politicians are still arguing over a second bailout plan for Greece. They're also trying to stop investor panic from spilling over to other economies in the eurozone — specifically Italy and Spain. Zanny Minton Beddoes, of The Economist, talks to Mary Louise Kelly about the European debt crisis.

4:00am

Tue July 12, 2011
Business

Business News

Mary Louise Kelly has business news.

4:00am

Tue July 12, 2011
Business

Google Announces Global Science Fair Winner

More than 7,000 individuals and teams competed in Google's global science far. The grand-prize winner takes home a $50,000 scholarship plus a trip to the Galapagos.

4:00am

Tue July 12, 2011
Media

Hacking Revelations Mount Against British Tabloids

Police have told Prince Charles and his wife Camilla that the voicemail on their mobile phones was likely hacked by Rupert Murdoch's News of the World. And former Prime Minister Gordon Brown says his family's medical records were illegally obtained by another Murdoch tabloid. This all spells big trouble for the planned big expansion of Murdoch's News Corp. television holdings.

4:00am

Tue July 12, 2011
Economy

Debt-Ceiling Negotiations Are Taxing For Both Sides

In three weeks, the country risks defaulting on its bills. Republican leaders have dug in their heels against any deficit reduction that entails increased tax revenues.

4:00am

Tue July 12, 2011
Business

The Last Word In Business

Steve Inskeep has the Last Word in business.

4:00am

Tue July 12, 2011
Middle East

U.S.: Syria's Government Orchestrated Attack

U.S. officials accuse the Syrian government of orchestrating Monday's attack on the U.S. Embassy in the capital, Damascus. Supporters of President Bashar Assad scaled the embassy fence, smashed bullet-proof glass and security cameras, and climbed onto the roof. The French Embassy was also targeted.

The assault came three days after a surprise visit by the American and French ambassadors to the city of Hama to show support for peaceful protests there.

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