Morning Edition on WEKU

Weekdays 5-9am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

Local Anchor(s): 
Stu Johnson
Local Host(s): 
Bryan Bartlett
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5102dd06e1c8ff994aa73fae|5102dce9e1c8ff994aa73f86

Pages

4:00am

Wed July 20, 2011
Europe

Anti-Austerity Riots Curb Tourist Visits To Athens

Despite Greece's economic crisis, tourist visits have actually increased by 10 percent this year. That's due in large part to continued unrest in Egypt and other parts of North Africa. But Athens is not feeling the love. Reports of anti-austerity riots outside Parliament and rising crime in the Greek capital are scaring tourists and investors away.

4:00am

Wed July 20, 2011
Politics

Senate, House Far Apart On Debt Ceiling Deal

Lawmakers in the House passed the Cut, Cap and Balance Act Tuesday. The measure conditions a higher debt ceiling on a constitutional amendment to balance the budget. The largely symbolic vote was seen as a chance for the most conservative elements of the Republican majority to flex their muscles and show their commitment to a "no new taxes solution" to the federal deficit issue.

4:00am

Wed July 20, 2011
Middle East

Wealthy Persian Gulf Tourists Travel To Turkey

Months of unrest in the Middle East and North Africa continue to take their economic toll. While tourism figures are down across the region, patterns are shifting. Beirut became the favored destination for Arab travelers reluctant to endure post Sept. 11 hostility in the West, but now it's losing those wealthy Persian Gulf visitors to Turkey.

12:01am

Wed July 20, 2011
Tina Brown's Must-Reads

Tina Brown's Must Reads: Reckoning With Rupert

News Corporation Chief Rupert Murdoch leaves the Houses of Parliament in London on July 19, 2011, after giving evidence to a Parliamentary Select Committee on the phone hacking scandal. "This is the most humble day of my life," Murdoch told British lawmakers.
Carl Court AFP/Getty Images

Tina Brown, editor of The Daily Beast and Newsweek, tells us what she's been reading in a feature that Morning Edition likes to call Word of Mouth.

This month, as Rupert Murdoch's News Corp reels from the News of the World hacking scandal, Brown, whose husband Harold Evans resigned from the Murdoch-owned London Sunday Times in 1982 after a much-publicized imbroglio with the magnate, selects a series of recent news and opinion articles which tackle Murdoch's falling empire from different directions.

Read more

10:00pm

Tue July 19, 2011
Sweetness And Light

Yankees' HOPE Week: Batting A Thousand

At last year's HOPE Week, pitcher Mariano Rivera warmed up with Jorge Grajales before the New York Yankees played the Detroit Tigers. Grajales threw out the game's first pitch.
Jim McIsaac Getty Images

Virtually all professional sports franchises make a point of aligning themselves in some ways with charities. From a cynical point of view, it's good public relations. But my experience is that the teams are genuine in their good works. And a funny thing often happens. Perhaps especially where children are involved, some of the athletes who initially look upon their involvement with a team's charity as drudgery β€” just more PR duty β€” end up being quite moved.

Read more

7:18am

Tue July 19, 2011
Around the Nation

Tar Heel. N.C. Seeks Mayoral Candidates

The current mayor of Tar Hell, N.C., is moving away, and no one in the town of 117 people has filed to run in the next election. All three town council seats are wide open too. One catch: You have to live within Tar Heel town limits to be elected.

7:14am

Tue July 19, 2011
Around the Nation

Some Photo Ops Work Out Better Than Others

Two New Jersey men spotted a police van and climbed in to get a picture while pretending to be arrested. But they locked themselves in and were arrested for real. In California, when I-405 was closed for repairs, three people pretended to have dinner on it. They posted the photo on Facebook sitting around a table with candles in a passing lane.

6:53am

Tue July 19, 2011
Asia

Pakistan's Insurgency Begins At Red Mosque

Pakistan faces a devastating insurgency. Pam Constable, a reporter for The Washington Post, recalls the moment when that insurgency began. She talks to Steve Inskeep about clerics preaching against the U.S. and Pakistani governments. By 2007, the Red mosque was stockpiling weapons.

6:47am

Tue July 19, 2011
Around the Nation

Camp Fosters Love For Space Program

Space camp began in 1982, the year after the shuttle first flew. The camp started out small but more than half a million students have graduated from the program. The U.S. Space and Rocket Center, which runs the camp, is building a new simulator to mirror NASA's goals to travel to the Moon, Mars and into deep space.

5:54am

Tue July 19, 2011
Media

CNN's Morgan Breaks Silence On 'News Of The World'

In the mid 90's, Piers Morgan cut his teeth as an editor at Murdoch's London tabloid the "Sun" and then became the top editor of its sister Sunday paper "News of the World." Two of his successors have been arrested and a third lost his job along with his staff when the paper closed.

5:48am

Tue July 19, 2011
Media

Rupert Murdoch To Appear Before Parliament Panel

Rupert Murdoch, his son and the former head of his newspaper business in the United Kingdom are expected to appear before a parliamentary committee Tuesday. They are due to be questioned about the phone hacking-scandal at the News of The World.

4:00am

Tue July 19, 2011
NPR Story

The Last Word In Business

Steve Inskeep has the Last Word in business.

4:00am

Tue July 19, 2011
NPR Story

Should Colleges Have To Show Their Graduates Find Work?

Now that the Education Department has released "Gainful Employment" rules for for-profit schools, some would like to see similar standards for non-profit colleges and universities. With student debt increasing, they say it would be useful for students to know what their job chances are. But the industry has resisted such labels, saying they do not fit liberal arts education. NPR's Larry Abramson reports.

4:00am

Tue July 19, 2011
NPR Story

N.J. Adopts Curriculum Dealing With Terrorism

In New Jersey, a new curriculum has been designed to help teachers talking about terrorism in class. It's called "Learning from the Challenges of Our Times: Global Security, Terrorism, and 9-11 in the Classroom." Relatives of 9-11 victims helped write the lessons.

4:00am

Tue July 19, 2011
Business

Business News

Mary Louise Kelly has business news.

5:03pm

Mon July 18, 2011
Music

Washed Out: Intimate Electronica

Ernest Greene, a.k.a. Washed Out.
Will Govus

A few years ago, Ernest Greene could be found working in the reference department of the University of South Carolina library. But in the back of his mind, he was writing songs. He later began recording those works, and he's just released his first full-length album, Within and Without.

Greene records under the name Washed Out, a term he learned as an amateur photographer.

Read more

7:10am

Mon July 18, 2011
Around the Nation

Deep Fried Kool-Aid Ball? Oh Yeah

At this year's Indiana State Fair, concessionaires Dennis and Cheryl Reas have a product for the whole family: deep fried Kool-Aid balls. They tell the Indianapolis Star the snack looks like a red hush puppy.

6:57am

Mon July 18, 2011
Business

iPad Deal Was Too Good To Be True

Bargain hunters browsing the Sears website over the weekend must have thought they'd struck gold. The site featured an ad for the Apple iPad for only $69. That's a fraction of the usual $745 price tag. The typo was the result of a third-party seller. Sears issued a statement apologizing, but said it wouldn't make good on any orders.

4:00am

Mon July 18, 2011
NPR Story

The Last Word In Business

Mary Louise Kelly and Steve Inskeep have the Last Word in business.

4:00am

Mon July 18, 2011
NPR Story

Obama To Announce Chief For Consumer Agency

The Obama administration is expected to nominate former Ohio Attorney General Richard Cordray as head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. The appointment would pass up Elizabeth Warren who pushed for the bureau's creation.

4:00am

Mon July 18, 2011
NPR Story

Deadline Still Hangs Over Debt-Ceiling Talks

The White House and congressional leaders continued talking over the weekend, but with no public signs of progress on a deal to raise the debt ceiling. Steve Inskeep talks to NPR News Analyst Cokie Roberts about when, and if, both sides will be able to reach an agreement.

4:00am

Mon July 18, 2011
Media

Phone-Hacking Scandal Widens Into Bribery Probe

Rebekah Brooks became the latest News Corp. executive to face criminal charges amid the ongoing phone-hacking scandal in Great Britain. Police arrested the former chief executive Sunday. The scandal has also cost Britain's top policeman his job.

4:00am

Mon July 18, 2011
Around the Nation

L.A. Drivers Ecstatic I-405 Re-Opens Early

Los Angeles officials have reopened a major interstate freeway that was closed for construction. Fearing traffic jams of epic proportions, many drivers stayed off the roads over the weekend. But cars were back on Interstate 405 a day ahead of schedule.

Read more

4:00am

Mon July 18, 2011
Business

Business News

Mary Louise Kelly has business news.

4:00am

Mon July 18, 2011
Business

Google-Plus Tries To Compete With Facebook

Google has rolled out its latest venture into the world of social media: Google Plus. Steve Inskeep talks to journalist Jennifer 8 Lee about the newest social network.

4:00am

Mon July 18, 2011
Afghanistan

Adviser To Afghan President Killed In Attack

In Afghanistan, a close adviser to President Hamid Karzai has been killed. It was the second killing in recent days of one of Karzai's allies. Last week, Karzia's half-brother was killed in the southern city of Kandahar.

4:00am

Mon July 18, 2011
Sports

World Cup: U.S. Loses To Japan On Penalty Kicks

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Some other news. The World Cup Soccer final brought a portion of America to a halt yesterday. People watched at home and in bars.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, host:

They howled as the U.S. Women's team just missed some early shots.

INSKEEP: They cheered as the U.S. twice pulled ahead.

KELLY: And then many fell silent as Japan came back and finally made more of the penalty kicks that decided a tie game.

INSKEEP: NPR's Mike Pesca was in Frankfort, Germany for the contest.

Read more

12:01am

Mon July 18, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Rethinking Tinnitus: When The Ringing Won't Stop, Clear Your Mind

Originally published on Wed July 27, 2011 11:45 am

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction teaches simple techniques β€” such as using slow breathing β€” to focus your attention.
iStockphoto

Silence is a beautiful thing. But Robert DeMong has accepted that he'll likely never experience it again.

He's got a condition called tinnitus, which means a ringing sound travels with him everywhere he goes, including to bed at night.

It came on suddenly about five years ago. And he says it threw him into depression. "It was like an ugly monster inside my head," recalls DeMong. "I couldn't sleep at night."

Read more

12:01am

Mon July 18, 2011
Author Interviews

Education Of An Interrogator: Questioning The CIA

Glenn Carle served for 23 years in the Clandestine Services of the Central Intelligence Agency.
Sally J. Carle

Glenn Carle's bosses asked him if he could go on a trip β€” one that would last somewhere between 30 and 60 days. His job? To interrogate a man suspected of being a top member of al-Qaida.

It was 2002 and, in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 tragedy, the U.S. was heavily engaged in its "War on Terror." Carle, a former CIA intelligence officer, was "surged" to become an interrogator and sent to one of the Agency's secret overseas facilities. He writes about his experience in his new book, The Interrogator: An Education.

Read more

12:29pm

Fri July 15, 2011
Politics

Obama Calls For At Least A 'Down Payment' On Deficit

President Obama and House Republicans have clashed in negotiations over how β€” or whether β€” to raise the federal borrowing limit, known as the debt ceiling. Obama had a news conference Friday, his second this week to discuss the spending cuts and revenue increases he thinks are needed to fix the problem. Mary Louise Kelly talks with NPR's Brian Naylor about the news conference and the partisan battle.

Pages