Morning Edition on WEKU

Weekdays 5-9am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

Local Anchor(s): 
Stu Johnson
Local Host(s): 
Bryan Bartlett
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5102dd06e1c8ff994aa73fae|5102dce9e1c8ff994aa73f86

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4:00am

Fri July 22, 2011
Around the Nation

Oklahoma's Parched Land Is In Need Of Massive Rainfall

Many areas of the country are suffering from "exceptional drought" conditions. That's the most intense level assigned by the federal agency that monitors droughts. Unusually dry conditions are creating ever expanding hardships for farmers and ranchers from New Mexico to Kansas. Oklahoma has been especially hard hit. Kurt Gwartney of member station KGOU reports.

4:00am

Fri July 22, 2011
Business

Business News

Mary Louise Kelly has business news.

4:00am

Fri July 22, 2011
Africa

Somali Refugees Stream Into Kenya To Escape Famine

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:37 am

Saruuro Aden traveled on foot from southern Somalia across the Kenyan border with her four children. She says they walked for 10 days.
Ofeibea Quist-Arcton NPR

The crippling drought in the Horn of Africa has affected about 11 million people in a region straddling Somalia, Ethiopia and Kenya. But it's Somalia that has been hit hardest. This week, the United Nations declared a famine in two parts of the lawless nation – Lower Shabelle and Bakool in the south.

Thousands of Somalis are crossing the border into semi-arid northeastern Kenya, in search of shelter, food and medical care. They are streaming into the giant Dadaab refugee complex, which is the world's biggest collection of camps.

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4:00am

Fri July 22, 2011
NPR Story

European Union Decides To Bail Out Greece, Again

European leaders have agreed on a massive new bailout plan for Greece. They also agreed to broader measures to deal with the continent's debt problems.

4:00am

Fri July 22, 2011
NPR Story

The Last Word In Business

Steve Inskeep has the Last Word in business.

4:00am

Fri July 22, 2011
NPR Story

Support Grows For Gang Of 6's Deficit Reduction Proposal

Senators Mark Warner (D-VA) and Saxby Chambliss (R-GA) talk to Steve Inskeep about the bipartisan deficit reduction plan proposed by the "Gang of Six." The White House and Congress are hoping to move on a deficit reduction plan alongside efforts to raise the debt limit. Many lawmakers say they won't vote to raise the debt limit without a plan to reduce the deficit.

12:01am

Fri July 22, 2011
Music News

Enterprising Young Musicians On The Road To Interlochen

Cellist Sara Page (center, right) rehearses with the World Youth Symphony Orchestra at Interlochen Arts Camp. Page is among the campers who made an exceptional effort to raise funds to attend the camp this year.
Sam Oldenburg for NPR

For young people who want a career in the arts, a handful of prestigious summer camps are a vital early step. Interlochen, in northern Michigan, is one of them.

Jessye Norman, Josh Groban, Norah Jones and Lorin Maazel all spent summers at Interlochen when they were younger. But with tuition ranging from $3,000 to $10,000, depending on the campers' age and discipline, does it mean that only rich kids get to follow in their footsteps? It turns out that some extra-resourceful young people are paving their own way. I went to camp to meet them.

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10:38pm

Thu July 21, 2011
StoryCorps

Surviving A Double-Lung Transplant: 'Life Is Good'

Nan Graham spoke with her son, Howell, about his recovery from lung-transplant surgery in Wilmington, N.C.
StoryCorps

As a child, Howell Graham was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis, a genetic disease that often impairs lung function. By his late 20s, Howell would lose his breath doing things as routine as brushing his teeth.

So he underwent a risky operation — in 1990, he had a double lung transplant. And today, Howell, 49, is one of the longest-surviving recipients of that surgery. Recently, Howell and his mother, Nan, talked about a few moments when it seemed like he might not make it.

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7:05am

Thu July 21, 2011
Around the Nation

Ex-Astronaut Says Camera Was A Gift From NASA

Edgar Mitchell traveled to the Moon aboard Apollo 14. After that 1971 journey, Mitchell took home a movie camera from the mission. He recently tried to auction it, but the space agency sued. Mitchell's lawyer says the camera was a gift, and in any event, NASA waited too long to ask for it back.

6:56am

Thu July 21, 2011
Around the Nation

'Post' Wants A Creative Name For Heat Wave

Washington, D.C. is suffering from intensive heat. The folks at The Washington Post blog "Capital Weather Gang" are trying to name it. Among the finalists: Helter Swelter, The Beltway Meltaway, and Sweat Ceiling.

5:24am

Thu July 21, 2011
Politics

Bachmann Courts 'King Makers' In South Carolina

After several weeks of campaigning, Michele Bachmann has become a series contender for the 2012 GOP presidential nomination. She's been campaigning in South Carolina, which hosts the first Southern primary of 2012. The winner in South Carolina has gone on to win every Republican nomination since 1980.

5:17am

Thu July 21, 2011
NPR Story

Mayor Bloomberg Donates $50 Million To Sierra Club

The Sierra Club is getting a big boost in its effort to shut down coal-fired power plants. The plants produce nearly half the nation's electricity. But they also pump out lots of pollution that contributes to climate change, makes people sick and causes premature deaths. NPR's Elizabeth Shogren reports that New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg supporting the organization's efforts with a donation of $50 million.

4:59am

Thu July 21, 2011
Economy

Debt's Impact Could Be Worse If Interest Rates Rise

Originally published on Fri July 22, 2011 12:01 am

For all the attention lately on the ballooning size of the national debt, short-term interest rates are so low that the government, at least at the moment, can borrow that money almost for free.

"Right now, with money as cheap as it is, the deficit is not a drag at all," said Albert "Pete" Kyle, a finance professor at the University of Maryland. "But if you look at what's coming in the future, the potential drag that you see in the future is a really big problem."

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4:00am

Thu July 21, 2011
NPR Story

Dangerous Heat Wave Bakes Midwest

In many parts of the country, it will be intensely hot again Thursday. From the South to the Midwest to the East Coast, temperatures will soar into the 90's and some areas are forecast to top 100 degrees.

4:00am

Thu July 21, 2011
Business

Business News

Steve Inskeep has business news.

4:00am

Thu July 21, 2011
Pop Culture

Comedians Find Their Niche At Comic-Con

Comic-Con, the annual comic book and pop culture convention, begins today in San Diego. An estimated 125,000 people will swarm the beachside city — some in costume — to check out the latest comic books, movies, TV shows — and comedy. NPR's Nina Gregory reports on the emergence of the comedy scene at Comic-Con.

4:00am

Thu July 21, 2011
Business

UAW Prepares To Bargain With Detroit's Big 3

The United Auto Workers union begins contract talks next week in Detroit with the Big Three automakers. It's the first time since the economic collapse that the car companies and the union have sat down to work out a deal. NPR's Sonari Glinton reports that since the last talks, General Motors, Ford and Chrysler are more profitable.

4:00am

Thu July 21, 2011
Space

Atlantis Landing Ends 30 Years Of Shuttle Missions

Atlantis and its four crew members landed at the Kennedy Space Center just before 6 a.m. Now that Atlantis has returned to Earth, there will be no more shuttle flights. The program is ending after 30 years.

12:01am

Thu July 21, 2011
Books News & Features

Stieglitz And O'Keeffe: Their Love And Life In Letters

Alfred Stieglitz attached this photograph to a letter for Georgia O'Keeffe, dated July 10, 1929. Below the photograph he wrote, "I have destroyed 300 prints to-day. And much more literature. I haven't the heart to destroy this..."
Yale Collection of American Literature, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library

From 1915 until 1946, some 25,000 pieces of paper were exchanged between two major 20th century artists. Painter Georgia O'Keeffe and photographer Alfred Stieglitz wrote each other letters — sometimes two and three a day, some of them 40 pages long. The correspondence tracks their relationship from acquaintances to admirers to lovers to man and wife to exasperated — but still together — long-marrieds.

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7:29am

Wed July 20, 2011
Around the Nation

Mass. Man Savors Court Victory Over Parking Ticket

In 2009, Michael D. Rivers parked at a meter in Springfield, Mass., and received a $25 parking ticket. Rivers said he put 50 cents in the meter, which was broken. He chose to fight it in court, representing himself. Two years and hundreds of dollars in filing fees later, a judge threw out the ticket.

7:19am

Wed July 20, 2011
Around the Nation

Pittsburgh Celebrates Getting Its 'H' Back

This week marks 100 years since the city got its "H" back. A federal agency had stripped Pittsburgh of its silent, final letter. It wanted a standard for all cities ending in berg.

4:00am

Wed July 20, 2011
NPR Story

New York City Holds Lottery For Same-Sex Wedding Date

Same-sex marriage becomes legal in New York on Sunday. New York City officials have been overwhelmed with more than 1,700 applications, and they fear they will not be able to handle all those requests on one day.

4:00am

Wed July 20, 2011
NPR Story

Business News

Steve Inskeep has business news.

4:00am

Wed July 20, 2011
Sports

NBA Players Urged To Play Abroad During Lockout

With no signs that the NBA lockout will be resolved anytime soon, the players union is encouraging its members to take their talents overseas. New Jersey Nets Point Guard Deron Williams recently announced that he will play for a team in Turkey. Steve Inskeep talks with Sports Illustrated's Pablo Torre about the possibility more players will follow suit.

4:00am

Wed July 20, 2011
Europe

Anti-Austerity Riots Curb Tourist Visits To Athens

Despite Greece's economic crisis, tourist visits have actually increased by 10 percent this year. That's due in large part to continued unrest in Egypt and other parts of North Africa. But Athens is not feeling the love. Reports of anti-austerity riots outside Parliament and rising crime in the Greek capital are scaring tourists and investors away.

4:00am

Wed July 20, 2011
Politics

Senate, House Far Apart On Debt Ceiling Deal

Lawmakers in the House passed the Cut, Cap and Balance Act Tuesday. The measure conditions a higher debt ceiling on a constitutional amendment to balance the budget. The largely symbolic vote was seen as a chance for the most conservative elements of the Republican majority to flex their muscles and show their commitment to a "no new taxes solution" to the federal deficit issue.

4:00am

Wed July 20, 2011
Middle East

Wealthy Persian Gulf Tourists Travel To Turkey

Months of unrest in the Middle East and North Africa continue to take their economic toll. While tourism figures are down across the region, patterns are shifting. Beirut became the favored destination for Arab travelers reluctant to endure post Sept. 11 hostility in the West, but now it's losing those wealthy Persian Gulf visitors to Turkey.

12:01am

Wed July 20, 2011
Tina Brown's Must-Reads

Tina Brown's Must Reads: Reckoning With Rupert

News Corporation Chief Rupert Murdoch leaves the Houses of Parliament in London on July 19, 2011, after giving evidence to a Parliamentary Select Committee on the phone hacking scandal. "This is the most humble day of my life," Murdoch told British lawmakers.
Carl Court AFP/Getty Images

Tina Brown, editor of The Daily Beast and Newsweek, tells us what she's been reading in a feature that Morning Edition likes to call Word of Mouth.

This month, as Rupert Murdoch's News Corp reels from the News of the World hacking scandal, Brown, whose husband Harold Evans resigned from the Murdoch-owned London Sunday Times in 1982 after a much-publicized imbroglio with the magnate, selects a series of recent news and opinion articles which tackle Murdoch's falling empire from different directions.

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10:00pm

Tue July 19, 2011
Sweetness And Light

Yankees' HOPE Week: Batting A Thousand

At last year's HOPE Week, pitcher Mariano Rivera warmed up with Jorge Grajales before the New York Yankees played the Detroit Tigers. Grajales threw out the game's first pitch.
Jim McIsaac Getty Images

Virtually all professional sports franchises make a point of aligning themselves in some ways with charities. From a cynical point of view, it's good public relations. But my experience is that the teams are genuine in their good works. And a funny thing often happens. Perhaps especially where children are involved, some of the athletes who initially look upon their involvement with a team's charity as drudgery — just more PR duty — end up being quite moved.

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7:18am

Tue July 19, 2011
Around the Nation

Tar Heel. N.C. Seeks Mayoral Candidates

The current mayor of Tar Hell, N.C., is moving away, and no one in the town of 117 people has filed to run in the next election. All three town council seats are wide open too. One catch: You have to live within Tar Heel town limits to be elected.

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