Morning Edition on WEKU

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Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

Local Anchor(s): 
Stu Johnson
Local Host(s): 
Bryan Bartlett
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4:00am

Thu August 4, 2011
NPR Story

Airlines Poised To Profit From FAA Shutdown

Airlines have been struggling this summer because of higher oil prices. Now they're getting a windfall profit thanks to Congress. Although they don't have to pay aviation taxes during the partial FAA shutdown, they have not lowered fares accordingly; they're keeping the difference. NPR's Mandalit del Barco reports.

10:58am

Wed August 3, 2011
Economy

FAA Operation Up In The Air Amid Shutdown

A partial shutdown of the Federal Aviation Administration, prompted by a political dispute, is adding to the country's debt. This month alone, that shutdown will cost the Treasury $1 billion in uncollected airline ticket taxes.

The shutdown is happening because of a labor dispute, a long-standing rivalry and a disagreement over subsidizing small airports. It's not clear when it will all be resolved now that members of Congress are leaving Washington, D.C., for their summer recess.

NPR's Renee Montagne talks to NPR's Brian Naylor about what's behind the standoff.

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10:00am

Wed August 3, 2011
U.S.

FAA Operations Up In The Air Amid Shutdown

Originally published on Wed August 3, 2011 1:42 pm

A fence secures the perimeter of a half-completed 236-foot FAA control tower at Oakland International Airport. Construction has been halted because of the FAA shutdown.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

A partial shutdown of the Federal Aviation Administration, prompted by a political dispute, is adding to the country's debt. This month alone, that shutdown will cost the Treasury $1 billion in uncollected airline ticket taxes.

The shutdown is happening because of a labor dispute, a long-standing rivalry and a disagreement over subsidizing small airports. It's not clear when it will all be resolved now that members of Congress are leaving Washington, D.C., for their summer recess.

NPR's Renee Montagne talks to NPR's Brian Naylor about what's behind the standoff.

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7:45am

Wed August 3, 2011
Politics

Sen. Reid Issues Warning To GOP On Taxes

Steve Inskeep reports on Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid's remarks about possible taxes in an interview on Tuesday's All Things Considered.

6:14am

Wed August 3, 2011
U.S.

Woman Treks The Appalachian In Record 46 Days

People sometimes spend six months hiking the Appalachian trail, but Jennifer Pharr Davis hiked the whole thing in record time: from Maine to Georgia in just under 46 1/2 days, beating the old record by about a day. She walked more than 2,000 miles, about 47 miles per day — and spotted 36 bears.

6:11am

Wed August 3, 2011
Strange News

Jordan's King Funds Star Trek Theme Park

Longtime fan King Abdullah II is putting up $1.5 billion for the Star Trek-themed park, beckoning fellow Trekkies to a place where few have gone before: a town on the Red Sea. It's a new frontier for a king who's actually been on board the starship USS Voyager — during a cameo on the show in the '90s.

5:00am

Wed August 3, 2011
Economy

Debt-Ceiling Deal Does Little For Global Economic Ills

With the fight over the U.S. debt ceiling finally over, investors are free again to focus on all the economic challenges that lie ahead, but they are finding little reason to celebrate. Stock markets around the world fell sharply on Tuesday, skipping the "relief rally" that customarily follows the resolution of a crisis.

In the United States, signs of a serious economic slowdown had been building up, though with attention focused on the debt-ceiling debate, the news had apparently not yet sunk in.

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5:00am

Wed August 3, 2011
National Security

Pentagon Could See Deep Cuts In Debt Deal

For several GOP lawmakers, the decision on whether to vote for the debt deal hinged on how the prescribed cuts will affect defense spending. In the end, enough Republicans in the House put their concerns about cutting the deficit over their concerns about cutting defense spending.

But no one really knows how much the Pentagon will have to cut as a result of the deal or when.

"We are in uncharted territory here," said David Berteau, an expert on budgetary issues with the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

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4:00am

Wed August 3, 2011
NPR Story

Business News

Steve Inskeep has this morning's business news.

4:00am

Wed August 3, 2011
NPR Story

Economist In Japan Eyes Effects Of U.S. Debt Debate

Steve Inskeep talks with Richard Koo, chief economist with the Nomura Research Institute, about debt ceilings, deficits and viewing the U.S. debate from Japan.

4:00am

Wed August 3, 2011
NPR Story

U.S. Auto Market Lags Along With Honda, Toyota Sales

The big three automakers continue to see growth in their recovery but last month sales hit a bit of a bump. The overall U.S. market was dragged down by sluggish sales of Hondas and Toyotas. Companies are still struggling to work out problems with their supply chains following Japan's earthquake and tsunami in March. NPR's Sonari Glinton reports.

10:00am

Tue August 2, 2011
Economy

In Europe, Asia, Stocks Fall Amid U.S. Economy Worries

Later today, President Obama is expected to sign the bill to avert a U.S. debt default. Despite Obama's actions, there is still concern the U.S. credit rating could be downgraded.

8:21am

Tue August 2, 2011
Analysis

Compromise In Congress: Does System Work After All?

Just a few days ago, the political system seemed completely stuck as the Aug. 2 debt-default deadline approached. Now the deadline has arrived, and it seems likely that President Obama will sign a debt limit extension. NPR's Ron Elving talks with Steve Inskeep about the path Congress took to get to the agreement.

4:59am

Tue August 2, 2011
Crime In The City

Taking On Crime In A Racially Divided D.C.

George Pelecanos' 17 crime novels take place in and around Washington, D.C. Pelecanos has also written for HBO's The Wire and Treme, which take place in Baltimore and New Orleans, but he says his novels will always be set in D.C.
Mai-Trang Dang via Flickr

All 17 of George Pelecanos' crime novels have been set in his hometown of Washington, D.C. — but he isn't writing about politicians, lawyers or lobbyists. Instead, Pelecanos' stories look at the city's greasers and drug dealers; its working black families and its ethnic neighborhoods.

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10:36am

Mon August 1, 2011
NPR Story

Market Relief Maybe Temporary Despite Debt Relief

Some analysts say the U.S. and its debt is still likely to be downgraded by credit rating agencies, because of the state of the economy.

4:59am

Mon August 1, 2011
Books News & Features

Brattleboro: Vermont's Hotbed Of Fictional Crime

Archer Mayor exposes the seedy underbelly of Brattleboro, Vt., in his mystery novels. But it's a challenge to bring out the dark side; Brattleboro, and Vermont in general, the author says, are "inordinately pleasant" places.
Ken Gallager

Brattleboro, Vt., is a bucolic town — pricked with picturesque church steeples — and home to a vibrant arts community. So it's an unlikely setting for gruesome murder and gritty crime, but that's just what goes on in Archer Mayor's Brattleboro-based Joe Gunther detective series.

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1:37pm

Fri July 29, 2011
Politics

How Debt Ceiling Talks Play Out On Wall Street

Wall Street Journal economics editor David Wessel talks about where we are in terms of the U.S. credit rating and whether it may be downgraded.

1:22pm

Fri July 29, 2011
NPR Story

Debate Continues As Debt-Ceiling Deadline Looms

For the latest developments in the ongoing debt ceiling negotiations, Steve Inskeep talks with NPR's Ari Shapiro.

10:13am

Fri July 29, 2011
Politics

Debt Ceiling Update

NPR's David Welna talks with Mary Louise Kelly, for the latest developments on the debt ceiling negotiations after the House of Representatives postponed a vote on its bill last night.

6:52am

Fri July 29, 2011
Strange News

Man Celebrates Hot Dog Month With Daily Dose

To celebrate Hot Dog Month, Rob Merlino has eaten a frank every day in July, according to the Boston Globe. The 47-year old father of five is eating them grilled, steamed, boiled and fried at shacks and diners throughout New England.

6:43am

Fri July 29, 2011
Strange News

Fugitive's Facebook Taunts Lead Police Right To Him

Victor Burgos fled because he faced criminal charges including domestic violence. He made the Ten Most Wanted list in Utica, N.Y. When he made it to New York City, he taunted police on Facebook, saying, "Catch me if you can. I'm in Brooklyn." According to the Daily News, police obliged.

4:36am

Fri July 29, 2011
Movie Interviews

Favreau Tips His Hat To The Western — With 'Aliens'

Jon Favreau began his career as a comedic actor but has since directed box-office smashes like Elf, Iron Man and Iron Man 2.
Frazer Harrison Getty Images

Set in the old West desert town of Absolution, Cowboys & Aliens has almost everything you'd expect to see in a classic Western: gunslingers, shoot-outs, saloons ... and aliens.

Just think of it as gourmet comfort food.

"Hopefully it's a really, really smart version of a very simplistic concept," actor-turned-director Jon Favreau tells NPR's Mary Louise Kelly.

As a director, Favreau is best known for his Iron Man mega-hits, but he says he was cautious not to let his latest film devolve into a sci-fi action popcorn movie.

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4:34am

Fri July 29, 2011
Planet Money

Why Interest Payments Come First

At some point next week, if Congress doesn't agree to raise the debt ceiling, the U.S. government may have to decide which bills to pay. What comes first: Social Security checks? Military spending? Food stamps?

There's not even a choice, says Jerome Powell, a former Under Secretary of the Treasury for Finance.

"Interest will be paid first," he says. "There's really no thought process there, it just has to be that way."

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6:56am

Thu July 28, 2011
Strange News

Artsy Would-Be Prison Escapees Foiled By Guard

Two inmates at Exeter prison in England nearly managed to tunnel their way to freedom. They hacked through a 4-foot-thick wall and disguised the hole with fake bricks made from papier-mache. The plot unraveled when a guard spotted dust on the ground.

6:54am

Thu July 28, 2011
Strange News

Teacher Suspended For Blogging About Kids Reinstated

A Pennsylvania teacher was suspended over her blog. School officials discovered she was writing about her students, calling them "frightfully dim" and "disengaged, lazy whiners." Now the Intelligencer of Doylestown says she's been reinstated — but with a kind of poetic justice. Her lawyer says she'd rather work at a different school, but she was sent back to Central Bucks East High School, teaching the same classes she apparently disliked.

5:00am

Thu July 28, 2011
Art & Design

Form And Function Meet In 'Modern By Design'

Originally published on Thu July 28, 2011 7:12 am

The High Museum of Art commissioned nendo, a Japanese design collective, to create Visible Structures — a 12-piece installation of furniture made out of form core and cardboard, reinforced with graphite tape.
Masayuki Hayashi

4:00am

Thu July 28, 2011
NPR Story

House GOP Debt Plan Faces Make-Or-Break Vote

Congress is still scrambling to vote on a deficit plan that could solve the current debt ceiling crisis. On Thursday, Speaker John Boehner is expected to present his plan for a vote in the House of Representatives. The Republican leader has called on his GOP brethren to get in line and support the proposal, while Senate Majority leader Harry Reid waits in the wings with a plan of his own.

4:00am

Thu July 28, 2011
NPR Story

Last Word In Business

Mary Louise Kelly has today's Last Word in business.

4:00am

Wed July 27, 2011
NPR Story

McDonald's Tries Connecting With Moms

McDonald's is using social media and mom bloggers to reach people it considers to be "influencers." It's developing an invite-only community for the most influential bloggers — inviting them to behind-the-counter tours, visits to headquarters and trips to farms that supply the restaurant chain's food. NPR's Allison Aubrey reports.

5:32pm

Tue July 26, 2011
A Blog Supreme

Frank Foster, Jazz Saxophonist And Arranger, Has Died

American jazz saxophonist Frank Foster performs on stage circa 1981.
David Redfern Redferns/Getty Images

Frank Foster, a saxophonist and composer/arranger best known for his longtime association with the Count Basie Orchestra, has died. He passed away in his sleep early Tuesday morning at his home in Chesapeake, Va., according to his widow and manager, Cecilia Foster. He was 82.

Foster was a key member of the "New Testament" Basie band — the large ensemble Basie led in the 1950s and beyond. In addition to his playing on tenor saxophone and other woodwinds, he contributed many melodies and arrangements. At least one of those tunes, "Shiny Stockings," became a jazz standard.

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