Morning Edition on WEKU

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Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

Local Anchor(s): 
Stu Johnson
Local Host(s): 
Bryan Bartlett
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7:03am

Fri September 2, 2011
Around the Nation

Plane Passenger Spots Burglars At His House

An Arkansas homeowner recently caught a pair of burglars. Stephen Lynn wasn't home at the time, he was flying overhead in a friend's plane. The Jonesboro Sun says Lynn was taking photos of his house when he spotted the criminals. He called the police and gave them turn-by-turn directions.

6:54am

Fri September 2, 2011
Around the Nation

Arizona Wedding Reception Gets Out Of Hand

Someone called police to report a brawl in the backyard of a home in suburban Phoenix. Police tried to stop the fighting and pepper-sprayed the crowd. You could predict that this would displease the bride, who was soon accused of kicking a police officer. A judge sentenced her to community service but no prison time.

5:07am

Fri September 2, 2011
Around the Nation

Powell: Don't Let Terrorism Change 'Who We Are'

Former Secretary of State Colin Powell reflects on how the country has changed in the 10 years since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Powell tells Steve Inskeep, "We have to be on guard that we don't spend so much time worrying about terrorism and guarding ourselves that we start to lose the essence of who we are as an open, freedom-loving people."

4:00am

Fri September 2, 2011
NPR Story

Irene Chases Away Catskills' Labor Day Tourists

Labor Day is usually a busy one for towns in New York's Catskills. Tourists from New York City and nearby states come to enjoy the last long weekend of summer. But this year, many towns are still cleaning up from the floods that followed Hurricane Irene. Business owners worry that even if they manage to reopen, the tourists won't come.

4:00am

Fri September 2, 2011
NPR Story

Famous Bookstore Attracts Photographers, Not Buyers

The bookshop made famous in the movie Notting Hill will close next week unless a buyer is found. A campaign has been started to keep the travel bookshop open. The founder of the shop says people are more interested in taking the store's picture than coming inside to buy a book.

4:00am

Fri September 2, 2011
Business

Spain's Lawmakers Set To Pass Debt Amendment

Spain's lower house of Parliament votes Friday on a constitutional amendment limiting the country's future budget deficit. The amendment would almost balance Spain's budget by the year 2020. The Senate is expected to vote on the measure next week.

4:00am

Fri September 2, 2011
Business

The Last Word In Business

Steve Inskeep has the Last Word in business.

12:01am

Fri September 2, 2011
Crime In The City

Sleuthing Around Dublin's Darkest Corners

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 11:55 am

O'Connell Street, 1952: Dublin in the 1950s is "perfect noir territory" says writer John Banville (who writes crime fiction under the pen name Benjamin Black). The city's dark history is incorporated into his work. "I am a novelist and therefore a cannibal," he says. "I eat whatever comes near me. Everything is material."
Gerry Cranham Fox Photos/Getty Images

"If you are going to write noir fiction, Dublin in the '50s is absolutely perfect," novelist Benjamin Black tells NPR's Philip Reeves. "All that poverty, all that fog, all that cigarette smoke, all those drink fumes. Perfect noir territory."

You may know Black better as Irish writer John Banville, winner of the 2005 Man Booker Prize for his novel The Sea. Banville writes his crime fiction under the name Benjamin Black. His novels star an oddball sleuth named Quirke — a bachelor in his early 40s who works as a consultant pathologist in a Dublin morgue.

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7:39am

Thu September 1, 2011
Around the Nation

Insurance Company Denies Winning Slap Shot Payout

Nate Smith, 11, slapped a hockey puck through a tiny hole from 89 feet away. The shot during a charity game in Minnesota was for a $50,000 prize. But the insurance company won't pay. Nate was standing in for his twin brother Nick, whose winning raffle ticket made him the one who should've held the hockey stick.

7:30am

Thu September 1, 2011
Around the Nation

Alaska Woman Rescues Her Dog From Bear's Jaw

When Juneau, Alaska, resident Brooke Collins looked up, she saw a bear. Worse than that: She saw a bear carrying her dog in its mouth. Collins ran up and punched the bear in the face. The bear dropped the dog and ran away.

5:34am

Thu September 1, 2011
Business

In Dispute, 'Financial Times' Pulls App Off iTunes

A major newspaper publisher is refusing to swallow demands from Apple, and it pulled its App off of iTunes. The Financial Times didn't want to pay Apple 30 percent of its revenue from customers who downloaded the App.

4:00am

Thu September 1, 2011
NPR Story

Europe Pressured To Do More To Help Libya

European powers played a key role in helping Libyan rebels defeat Moammar Gadhafi through the NATO bombing campaign. But now EU policy makers face a huge test in helping Libya secure the peace with humanitarian aid, technical and logistical support.

4:00am

Thu September 1, 2011
NPR Story

Rebels Tasked With Ensuring Libyans Security

Nearly all Libyans agree that security should be a top priority for the country's interim government. Some councilmen and rebel commanders say the first step to ensuring security will be to take away the light arms that both sides handed out en masse.

4:00am

Thu September 1, 2011
NPR Story

Irene Hits Vermont Right Before Fall Foliage Season

Towns in southern Vermont's Deerfield Valley are slowly getting reconnected with the outside world as road crews repair highways ravaged by Irene. But the resort communities face a harder time re-building their tourism-based businesses. They're worried about getting back on their feet in time for the fall foliage season, and the ski season ahead. John Dillon of Vermont Public Radio reports.

4:00am

Thu September 1, 2011
Governing

Panel Finds Widespread Waste By Wartime Contractors

A report by a congressional commission says the U.S. has lost tens of billions of dollars during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan because of waste and fraud in government contracts. The panel offered 15 recommendations to tackle the contracting mess. But one suggested fix — hire more government workers — might not be too popular right now.

4:00am

Thu September 1, 2011
Business

Business News

Steve Inskeep has business news.

4:00am

Thu September 1, 2011
Business

The Last Word In Business

Steve Inskeep has the Last Word in business.

4:00am

Thu September 1, 2011
Business

Justice Department Blocks AT&T, T-Mobile Merger

AT&T says it's disappointed by the government's decision to block its acquisition of wireless rival T-Mobile. The Justice Department said Wednesday it would go to court to prevent the two companies from merging. The deal involves the country's second and fourth biggest wireless companies. U.S. officials say the deal would hurt competition and send wireless prices higher.

12:01am

Thu September 1, 2011
Crime In The City

Athens Cop On The Trail Of Modern Greece

Athens' Monastiraki neighborhood is a meeting place for Greek and Ottoman culture. Case in point: the 18-century Tzistarakis Mosque (left) sits below the Acropolis (center) and serves as a focal point for Monastiraki Square.
Julian Finney Getty Images

For millions of tourists who flock to Athens every year, the city at the foot of the Acropolis represents the cradle of democracy and the sublime art of antiquity.

But to crime writer Petros Markaris, the Athens of today is both a peaceful Balkan haven and a symbol of the ugliness of modern, corrupt societies. In his detective novels, he takes on the financial and social crises sweeping Greece.

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12:35pm

Wed August 31, 2011
Business

AT&T's Bid For T-Mobile Blocked By Lawsuit

The Justice Department filed suit Wednesday to block AT&T's proposed takeover of T-Mobile. Officials say combining the country's second- and fourth-largest mobile phone carriers would be bad for competition. The $39 million deal has been under scrutiny from lawmakers and consumer groups. And the No. 3 carrier, Sprint Nextel, objects to the merger.

7:28am

Wed August 31, 2011
Arts & Life

Australian Artist Profits From Government Grant

An Australian artist received a government grant for $20,000 in cash. He neatly stacked the money into a pile. Voila, art! The piece is called Currency. It went up for auction and the winning buyer will pay $21,350.

7:09am

Wed August 31, 2011
Around the Nation

Air Traveler Sues Over Airport Searches

At airport security in Richmond, VA., Aaron Tobey stripped to his shorts showing off that on his chest was the Constitution's Fourth Amendment which forbids unreasonable searches. Tobey was detained and he sued the government. A judge has thrown out most of the suit but the court will hear Tobey's claim that his free speech rights were violated.

4:00am

Wed August 31, 2011
NPR Story

Exxon Enters Lucrative Arctic Deal With Russia

Russia and Exxon have reached an agreement that opens the way for oil exploration in the Russian sector of the Arctic Ocean. And it allows the Russians access to projects in other parts of the world, including the United States. David Greene talks to journalist Julia Ioffe, who's covering the story in Moscow.

4:00am

Wed August 31, 2011
NPR Story

The Last Word In Business

David Greene has the Last Word in business.

4:00am

Wed August 31, 2011
NPR Story

Dominion Linemen Risk Danger To Restore Power

Hurricane Irene left millions of people up and down the East Coast without electricity. Power companies say it could be a week before service is restored everywhere. At Dominion Power in Virginia, repair teams are working 16 hour shifts.

4:00am

Wed August 31, 2011
Economy

Will Hurricane Cleanup Help Stimulate The Economy?

Hurricane Irene is likely to cost billions of dollars. The storm did damage but not as much as some had feared. Will the sales of batteries and flashlights – and then repair costs – give the economy a needed boost?

4:00am

Wed August 31, 2011
Politics

Obama, GOP Candidates Address Veteran Groups

President Obama spoke to the 93rd annual convention of the American Legion in Minneapolis Tuesday. The president laid the groundwork for the upcoming 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, and for his speech next week on jobs and the deficit. GOP presidential candidates Mitt Romney and Rick Perry addressed the national convention of the Veterans of Foreign Wars in San Antonio, Texas.

4:00am

Wed August 31, 2011
Business

NTSB Blames PG&E For Deadly Gas Explosion

One of the nation's largest gas companies Pacific Gas & Electric is to blame for an explosion that killed eight people and burned down a neighborhood in California's Bay Area last year. That's the unanimous finding of the National Transportation Safety Board. The panel says substandard welds and other safety problems date back to the mid-1950s and that regulation was lax.

4:00am

Wed August 31, 2011
Politics

Budget Cuts Threaten NOAA's Weather Forecasts

Communities on the East Coast planned for hurricane Irene with help from analysts at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. NOAA forecasters use data from federally-funded weather satellites to predict storms. One of those satellite programs is facing deep cuts in the latest round of congressional belt-tightening.

4:00am

Wed August 31, 2011
Africa

Libyan Rebels Ask Police To Return To Tripoli

Libya's Transitional National Council is calling on police to return to the streets of Tripoli. The police fled as rebels took control of the capital. Despite being associated with Moammar Gadhafi's regime, and no money to pay them, some police are returning to work.

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