Morning Edition on WEKU

Weekdays 5-9am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

Local Anchor(s): 
Stu Johnson
Local Host(s): 
Bryan Bartlett
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5102dd06e1c8ff994aa73fae|5102dce9e1c8ff994aa73f86

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12:01am

Fri September 16, 2011
Monkey See

Jane Lynch: A Life Of 'Happy Accidents'

Voice

It's a big week for Jane Lynch. Her memoir, Happy Accidents, was released on Tuesday, and this Sunday night, she'll be hosting the Primetime Emmy Awards. And she's a reasonably good bet to pick one up, too: her second in a row for playing the scheming cheerleading coach Sue Sylvester on Fox's Glee. On Friday's Morning Edition, she talks to David Greene about her career, her book, and the difficult process of telling her parents she was gay.

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12:01am

Fri September 16, 2011
Interviews

Memories Of Grandma Silvia, And Slavery's Legacy

Ellaraino (right), spoke about her late grandmother with her friend Baki AnNur at StoryCorps in Los Angeles.
StoryCorps

When she was 16, Ellaraino met her great-grandmother, Silvia, for the first time. And Silvia had plenty of stories to tell. She described being a teenager, much like Ellaraino — and seeing the Civil War, and slavery, come to an end.

That was back in 1955, when Ella Raino's family simply called her Ella. She would later go on to become an actress and storyteller, eventually combining her names into one.

As Ellaraino recalls, her family had several reasons for sending her on a trip. For one thing, she spent a lot of time thinking about her boyfriend — maybe a bit too much.

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7:16am

Thu September 15, 2011
Around the Nation

Maryland Football Uniforms Are Vibrant On Purpose

When the University of Maryland debuted the new uniforms earlier this month, a lot of people didn't like them. The school's athletic director says he intended for you to notice. Many schools create new uniforms in search of a hip image, grabbing the attention of prospective football recruits.

7:10am

Thu September 15, 2011
Business

This Phone Has No Apps But It's Made Of Gold

A Danish phone company just released a mobile phone made of pure gold. It's priced around $60,000. The target market: Russia. Reuters reports the phones have no apps, no camera and no calendar.

4:38am

Thu September 15, 2011
Education

Md. Teachers Must Promote Environmental Literacy

The start of a new school year in Maryland brings a new requirement: All schools in the state must develop plans to promote environmental literacy. The new requirement is creating some challenges for teachers. The goal is to integrate environmental concerns into science, social studies and other topics.

4:00am

Thu September 15, 2011
Business

The Last Word In Business

David Greene has the Last Word in business.

4:00am

Thu September 15, 2011
Europe

Eurozone Crisis Threatens To Destroy European Union

Originally published on Thu September 15, 2011 6:32 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, host: It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, host: And I'm Steve Inskeep. Pressure is growing on European leaders to do something they've made it really, really plain they hate to do.

GREENE: For all the billions they've committed to propping up the Greek economy, it may still not be enough, and Greece's trouble has led to questions about Italy and even France.

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4:00am

Thu September 15, 2011
Europe

Does The Eurzone Still Make Sense?

David Greene talks to Josef Joffe, editor of the German newspaper "Die Zeit," about whether there are still benefits to the countries that use the euro.

4:00am

Thu September 15, 2011
Economy

Rate Of Homeless Female Vets Rises Near Fort Bragg

Originally published on Thu September 15, 2011 6:54 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, host: More than 200,000 women have served in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. While their numbers are small compared to their male counterparts, many women veterans are facing the same problems finding employment and affordable housing. In Fayetteville, North Carolina, home to the Army's Fort Bragg, the number of homeless female veterans is rising rapidly. Jessica Jones of North Carolina Public Radio reports that many of them are young women with children.

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4:00am

Thu September 15, 2011
Business

Business News

Steve Inskeep has business news.

4:00am

Thu September 15, 2011
Economy

Spain's Teachers Protest Contract Changes, Layoffs

The economic crisis in Spain has hit public education where "jobs for life" had been the norm for teachers. As students head back to school, teachers across Spain are demonstrating against layoffs and contract changes.

12:01am

Thu September 15, 2011
Race

Feeling Like A Tourist: Being Black In New England

Originally published on Thu September 15, 2011 1:02 pm

Debra Nunnally Beaupre loves exploring New England's picturesque back roads. But she says she doesn't always find it easy to travel there.
Debra Nunnally Beaupre

I am a New Englander, born and bred, with the accent to prove it. Originally from Massachusetts, I now live in northern New Hampshire, in an area popular with vacationers. However, as a black woman in an overwhelmingly white state, there are times when I feel like a tourist.

Many residents here have never known a person of color. Some want to; others do not. Problem is, when I leave my own small town, it's impossible to know which type I will encounter.

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12:00am

Thu September 15, 2011
Monkey See

The Headline From NY Fashion Week: Print(s) Is Not Dead

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:24 am

A model poses at Mercedes Benz Fashion Week in New York City.
Jesse Lirola Getty Images

Today's the last day of New York Fashion Week, that twice-yearly ritual at which retailers and editors give us a look at what we're going to be craving in spring. Big this year: prints. Whimsical prints.

To get a bead on what looks like a swing back away from minimalism, Morning Edition guest host David Greene talks to Sally Singer, editor-in-chief of T: The New York Times Style Magazine.

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4:14pm

Wed September 14, 2011
Music Interviews

For St. Vincent, Music Is The Easy Part

Annie Clark's songs, though anchored by her sweet vocals, often have an unsettling edge. Her latest album as St. Vincent is Strange Mercy.
Tina Tyrell Courtesy of the artist

If you've ever wanted to unlock your emotions without really talking about them, Annie Clark understands. The 28-year-old musician performs under the name St. Vincent and has become known for layering her sweet voice over sometimes harsh, creepy electronic and guitar sounds.

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2:15pm

Wed September 14, 2011
Planet Money

A Slow-Motion Bank Run In Europe

Originally published on Fri September 16, 2011 11:39 am

MICHEL GANGNE AFP/Getty Images

Update: This post was published on Sept. 14. On Sept. 15, the European Central Bank, along with other central banks from around the world, announced a new lending program to fight the slow-motion run on Europe's banks. Here's more on that program.

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7:55am

Wed September 14, 2011
Around the Nation

Candy Company Claims World's Biggest Chocolate Bar

The Chicago company World's Finest Chocolate may have just made the world's biggest chocolate bar. It weighs six tons and sort of looks like an edible brown bus. The company hopes it breaks the world record.

7:45am

Wed September 14, 2011
Around the Nation

Gumby Turns Out To Be A Stand-Up Guy

Recently a man who tried to rob a California 7-Eleven. He disguised himself as Gumby, but he was foiled when his bulky gloves kept him from reaching the gun he claimed to have in his pocket. The San Diego Union-Tribune reports police identified Gumby and gave him a call. He turned himself in, brought his accomplice and also surrendered the Gumby suit.

7:07am

Wed September 14, 2011
Middle East

Iranian Court Reviews Plan To Offer Hikers Bail

In Iran Tuesday, President, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad told NBC authorities would soon release two American hikers convicted on espionage charges. A lawyer for the hikers also said an appeals court would release them on bail. Judges say they're still reviewing the plan to offer bail.

4:00am

Wed September 14, 2011
NPR Story

Moody's Downgrades Ratings Of 2 French Banks

The downgrade by Moody's Investors Service didn't come as a huge surprise. French banks hold a large amount of Greek debt and their shares have taken a beating in world markets lately. France is at the heart of the eurozone crisis because its banks are some of the most heavily invested in Greek debt.

4:00am

Wed September 14, 2011
Business

The Last Word In Business

David Greene has the Last Word in Business

4:00am

Wed September 14, 2011
NPR Story

Israel Grows More Isolated After Arab Spring

David Greene talks with Robert Malley, Middle East and North Africa Program Director at the International Crisis Group, about Israel's growing isolation in the Middle East, following problems with Turkey and other countries.

4:00am

Wed September 14, 2011
Economy

Census Bureau: Poverty Rate Rises Past 2009 Level

The nation's overall poverty rate climbed to 15.1 percent last year, according to new data from the Census Bureau. That's up from 14.3 percent in 2009 — which means 46.2 million Americans were living in poverty in 2010.

4:00am

Wed September 14, 2011
Economy

Portion Of Obama Jobs Bill Would Update School Buildings

President Obama's road trip to push his jobs bill takes him to North Carolina Wednesday. It's the third election battleground state the president has visited in less than a week. He's promoting his plan to prop up the economy with $447 billion in tax cuts and new government spending. Some of that money would go to refurbish outdated school buildings. Obama stressed that idea during a stop in Columbus, Ohio, Tuesday.

4:00am

Wed September 14, 2011
Afghanistan

20-Hour Insurgent Attack Ends In Afghan Capital

Originally published on Wed September 14, 2011 7:07 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, host: This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, host: And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

An attack on Kabul, Afghanistan is over. Attackers took control of a building that had a clear line of fire down to the U.S. embassy and NATO headquarters in the heart of the city. And it's taken 20 hours for Afghan forces to finally clear that building. It is inside that building that we have found NPR's Renee Montagne and Quil Lawrence.

Hello to you both.

QUIL LAWRENCE: Good morning, Steve.

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4:00am

Wed September 14, 2011
Around the Nation

Neighbors Help Each Other Get Past Vermont Flood Waters

Thousands of Vermonters were hammered by flooding due to Tropical Storm Irene. Many say they're counting less on federal or state emergency aid. Instead, they are relying on help from their neighbors and their own resilience to get back to business. Nina Keck of Vermont Public Radio reports.

3:25pm

Tue September 13, 2011
All Songs Considered Blog

Country Music Pioneer Wade Mainer Dies At 104

Originally published on Wed September 14, 2011 1:09 pm

Wade Mainer's sons of the Mountaineers, the South's "Leading Hillbillies."
Southern Folklife Collection University of North Carolina

There might be no bluegrass music as we know it without Wade Mainer, who died Monday at his home in Flint, Mich., Sept. 12 at age 104.

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8:45am

Tue September 13, 2011
Afghanistan

Gunmen Attack U.S. Embassy, NATO Headquarters

In the Afghan capital Kabul, insurgents fired rocket-propelled grenades and assault rifles at the U.S. Embassy and NATO headquarters. Other buildings were also targeted in Kabul. U.S. officials say there are no causalities at the Embassy.

8:26am

Tue September 13, 2011
Afghanistan

Insurgents Fire On U.S. Embassy In Afghan Capital

Insurgents appear to have launched a coordinated attack in the heart of Afghanistan's capital city. Rocket propelled grenades and assault weapons could be heard across Kabul — targeting the U.S. Embassy and NATO headquarters.

8:14am

Tue September 13, 2011
Afghanistan

Afghan Insurgents Launch Multiple Attacks In Kabul

Originally published on Tue September 13, 2011 8:47 am

The Taliban is claiming responsibility for gunfire and explosions heard around the Afghan capital Kabul. Insurgents have been firing in the direction of the U.S. Embassy as well as other landmarks.

7:44am

Tue September 13, 2011
Around the Nation

Warning! Bear Spray Is Not Meant To Be Sat On

The National Park Service says if you're hiking, it's good to carry an approved bear pepper spray. Just don't sit on it. At Grand Teton National Park, a ranger was speaking at the visitors center when a guest sat on a can of bear spray. The blog, "National Parks Traveler," says the building was evacuated.

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