Morning Edition on WEKU

Weekdays 5-9am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

Local Anchor(s): 
Stu Johnson
Local Host(s): 
Bryan Bartlett
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5102dd06e1c8ff994aa73fae|5102dce9e1c8ff994aa73f86

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12:01am

Fri October 7, 2011
Author Interviews

'Gardener' Gives 'Heirloom Life' To Forgotten Flora

The Yokohama squash was first introduced to North America around 1860 by James Hogg of Yorkville, N.Y. after his brother, Thomas, sent him the seeds from Japan.

Jeremiah C. Gettle and Emilee Freie Gettle Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Co. LLC

As a child growing up on his family's farm in the 1980s, Jere Gettle didn't spend his evenings watching TV; instead, he read seed catalogs. To him, the endless varieties of seeds with exotic sounding names were full of possibility. He loved the idea of planting them in the ground, tending the crops that grew from them and preparing the harvested vegetables for a family meal.

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12:19pm

Thu October 6, 2011
Economy

Obama To Congress: Make Jobs Proposal Top Priority

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

President Obama sought this morning to put his proposal to create American jobs at the top of Congress' to-do list. The president has traveled the country in recent weeks, trying to rally public support for his $447 billion plan. And today, he held a press conference at the White House.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: And the reason I keep going around the country talking about this jobs bill is because people really need help right now. Our economy really needs a jolt right now.

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7:27am

Thu October 6, 2011
Europe

Horshack Move Banned At British School

Teachers say the new method of giving thumbs up has a calming effect, and makes it easier not to overlook students who don't want to draw attention to themselves. The new method is more like The Fonz on Happy Days and less like Arnold Horshack on Welcome Back Kotter.

7:17am

Thu October 6, 2011
Around the Nation

Squirrel Steals Spotlight At Phillies-Cardinals Game

The Philadelphia Phillies played the St. Louis Cardinals Wednesday night, and for the second straight game a squirrel stole the show. This time the creature darted in front of the batter's box and dashed into the stands at Busch Stadium. The Cardinals' 5-3 victory was celebrated on Twitter by a new user called @BuschSquirrel.

7:02am

Thu October 6, 2011
Europe

How Belgium Mirrors Europe's Economic Divide

Belgium has spent 16 months struggling to form a federal government. Observers say that issue is a microcosm of the financial crisis that has hit the eurozone.

6:56am

Thu October 6, 2011
Remembrances

Steve Jobs Left His Mark On Pixar

Pixar computer-generated animation kicked off a renaissance in animated films — including blockbusters Toy Story, Finding Nemo and Wall-E. After Steve Jobs left Appple in 1985, he bought Pixar from George Lucas. In 2006, Jobs sold Pixar to Disney.

6:53am

Thu October 6, 2011
Politics

Christie Allies Freed To Support Other Candidates

Former vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie announced this week they would not be seeking the Republican presidential nomination. Among the most enthusiastic advocates of a Christie presidential bid were a handful of Northeastern investors. Some of them have already jumped to join Mitt Romney.

6:46am

Thu October 6, 2011
Economy

Thousands Join In Occupy Wall Street Protests

Thousands of protesters filled the streets of Manhattan's financial district Wednesday night. They came to show support for Occupy Wall Street, a demonstration that is now in its third week. Some of the marchers represented labor unions and other organizations, but many were just ordinary New Yorkers who came to voice their support for the populist protest.

6:41am

Thu October 6, 2011
Remembrances

Remembering Steve Jobs' 'Attention To Detail'

Originally published on Thu October 6, 2011 7:02 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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4:00am

Thu October 6, 2011
NPR Story

The Last Word In Business

Lynn Neary has the Last Word in business.

4:00am

Thu October 6, 2011
NPR Story

Arab Bloggers Gather In Tunisia After Arab Spring

Hundreds of bloggers from across the Arab world are meeting in Tunis, Tunisia, this week to discuss cyber-activism and political change. This is their third annual gathering, and it follows a dramatic year since Arab uprisings began last December. Saudi blogger Ahmed Al Omran, an NPR social media intern, talks to Renee Montagne about the role bloggers played in inspiring change.

4:00am

Thu October 6, 2011
NPR Story

Tough Ala. Immigration Law Changes Way Of Life

A federal judge has ruled that Alabama's strict immigration laws will go forward even as appeals are made through the judicial system. Hispanic-owned businesses in the state say their customers have vanished. Among other things, the new law requires police to verify the immigrations status of suspects if there's "reasonable suspicion" they are in the country illegally.

4:00am

Thu October 6, 2011
Middle East

Egypt, 30 Years After Anwar Sadat's Death

Lynn Neary talks to Steven Cook, senior follow for Middle Eastern studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, about the 30th anniversary of the assassination of former Egyptian President Anwar Sadat. They discuss how the past is shaping Egypt's future.

4:00am

Thu October 6, 2011
Business

Business News

Originally published on Thu October 6, 2011 7:33 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with the big loss for the tech world.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: Steve Jobs died yesterday. The co-founder of Apple was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer seven years ago. From the time a young Steve Jobs introduced the Apple I, his products changed consumer behavior.

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7:46am

Wed October 5, 2011
Around the Nation

Clerk Inadvertently Helps Ga. Woman Win Powerball

Kathy Scruggs of Georgia went to the store to buy a Mega Millions lottery ticket. By mistake, the clerk gave her a ticket for Powerball. Scruggs decided to buy both. The unemployed woman's Powerball ticket was worth more than $15 million.

7:32am

Wed October 5, 2011
Around the Nation

Bible Belt Oktoberfest Finally Taps A Beer Keg

To celebrate its German roots, residents of Cullman, Ala., usually donned liederhosen and ate bratwurst in. But keeping with Bible Belt values, beer was verboten. This year kegs are being tapped at what had been billed as the world's only dry Oktoberfest.

4:00am

Wed October 5, 2011
Business

Bank of New York Mellon Faces 2 Government Suits

Originally published on Wed October 5, 2011 5:28 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with lawsuits against a big New York bank.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: The Bank of New York Mellon is facing two more government lawsuits involving its currency trading business. The suits were filed yesterday by the Manhattan U.S. attorney and New York attorney general. The lawsuits accuse the bank of promising clients, including public pension funds, the best exchange rate, then giving them the worst rate and pocketing the difference.

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4:00am

Wed October 5, 2011
Europe

Public Sector Workers Strike Paralyzes Greece

Originally published on Wed October 5, 2011 5:28 pm

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary. Steve Inskeep is away.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

We're going to hear now about the continuing economic woes of Greece. It's one of the small European Union countries drowning in debt. Today it faces yet another protest. This time, a general strike by workers in the public sector furious about more cuts aimed at them. The pressure to shrink the government payroll is coming from international creditors.

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4:00am

Wed October 5, 2011
Middle East

U.N. Resolution Against Syria Fails In Security Council

The U.N. Security Council has failed to agree on what to do about Syria's brutal crackdown on anti-government protesters. Tuesday night, Russia and China vetoed a resolution condemning Syria, even after the text was watered down and stripped of any threats of sanctions.

4:00am

Wed October 5, 2011
Around the Nation

USDA Wants To Limit Potatoes In School Lunches

The Agriculture Department plans to limit potato consumption among schoolchildren to two servings a week. But politicians and farmers in potato-growing states such as Maine say the spud is being unfairly targeted. As it turns out, schoolchildren have strong opinions about potatoes too. Josie Huang of Maine Public Radio reports.

4:00am

Wed October 5, 2011
Education

Thieves Scam Aid From Online Education Sites

The Department of Education says that as distance learning has grown so has fraud. An inspector general's report found that scam artists are taking advantage of the popularity of online education to steal federal education money.

4:00am

Wed October 5, 2011
Economy

How Greece's Financial Crisis Hurts The U.S. Economy

David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal talks to Lynn Neary about why the economic situation in Greece is affecting European banks and the U.S. financial picture.

4:00am

Wed October 5, 2011
Business

Apple's Latest iPhone Underwhelms Investors

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, host: Samsung says it will file court injunctions in France and Italy to try and block the sale of Apple's latest iPhone, citing patent infringement. Apple unveiled its latest version of the popular smartphone just yesterday. As NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports, the new device, called the 4S, didn't make the usual splash.

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4:00am

Wed October 5, 2011
Business

Sandy Pope Challenges James Hoffa To Lead Teamsters

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, host: The presidency of one of the biggest unions in the country is up for grabs. James Hoffa currently heads the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, and he's facing the first challenge by a woman in the Teamsters' 108-year-old history. Sandy Pope is a former truck driver. If she becomes head of the union and its 1.4 million members, her challenge would be to turn around years of declining membership.

NPR's Beenish Ahmed reports.

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4:00am

Wed October 5, 2011
Business

The Last Word In Business

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, host: Our last word in business today is...

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME SONG FROM TV SHOW, "THE SIMPSONS")

UNIDENTIFIED GROUP: (Singing) The Simpsons.

NEARY: The animated comedy "The Simpsons" is in its 23rd season, and there may not be a 24th. The actors who voice the parts of Homer, Bart and other key characters are fighting with 20th Century Fox over pay. Fox says it may end the hit comedy if an agreement can't be reached. The actors reportedly make about $8 million a season. Fox wants them to take a 45 percent pay cut.

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12:01am

Wed October 5, 2011
Monkey See

Skipping The Ads On TV? Get Ready For The Shows That Are The Ads

My Pretty Pony is a Hasbro toy, but it's also a Discovery/Hasbro TV show on The Hub.

The Hub

You know regular product placement, right? Top Chef and its plugs for frozen meals and Gladware, cars being name-checked by action stars speeding away in them, and — of course — the carbonation-off currently taking place between American Idol (COKE! COKE! COKE!) and The X Factor (PEPSI! PEPSI! PEPSI!). But as Elizabeth Blair reports on Wednesday's Morning Edition, you haven't seen anything yet.

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7:31am

Tue October 4, 2011
Asia

Chinese ATMs Dispense Gold Bars

Recently unveiled, the new ATMs shell out bars of gold in different weights and shapes. Gold is a popular investment in China, and there are plans to introduce 2,000 of the machines. Each can hold more than 440 lbs. of gold.

7:28am

Tue October 4, 2011
Around the Nation

Frustrated Consumer Sues Walmart Over 2 Cents

Mary Bach says the price for her Brown and Serve sausage scanned for two pennies more than what the price tag showed. The Pennsylvania woman, who's a consumer activist, accused Walmart of unfair trade practices and she won. A judge awarded her $100 in damages. Walmart has a month to appeal.

4:00am

Tue October 4, 2011
Economy

Venture Capitalist cautions Against Job Creation Myths

Bill Frezza, a venture capitalist and a fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute says the idea that creating jobs leads to growth and prosperity is a fallacy. He tells Lynn Neary that the jobs myth is at the heart of the nation's unemployment problems.

4:00am

Tue October 4, 2011
Politics

Presidential Election Money Race Is On

The presidential campaigns don't have to file their third-quarter disclosure reports until the end of next week. Numbers, however, are leaking out. NPR's Peter Overby has more.

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