Morning Edition on WEKU

Weekdays 5-9am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

Local Anchor(s): 
Stu Johnson
Local Host(s): 
Bryan Bartlett
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5102dd06e1c8ff994aa73fae|5102dce9e1c8ff994aa73f86

Pages

12:01am

Mon August 8, 2011
Books

A Year Later, Chilean Miners Sift Through Trauma

A year ago, most of the world had never heard of Copiapo, Chile, nor given much attention to the lives of the miners who went down into its copper mines daily. That was until Aug. 5, 2010, when a cave-in at the San Jose copper mine trapped 33 men more than 2,000 feet underground.

Once the Chilean government knew the men were alive, they focused on a massive rescue effort, and after 69 days, the men ascended as celebrities of sorts. A year on, the movie rights have been sold, but fame has not brought the fortune they expected.

Read more

12:01am

Mon August 8, 2011
Living Large: Obesity In America

Big, Fat Stereotypes Play Out On The Small Screen

Originally published on Wed August 1, 2012 7:00 pm

Jackie Gleason (right) played Ralph Kramden — a bumbling but loveable overweight husband — in the 1950s sitcom The Honeymooners. Audrey Meadows co-starred as his wife, Alice.
Paramount Pictures Getty Images

Part of an ongoing series on obesity in America.

About the only thing all real fat people have in common is that they weigh more. Beyond that, they are as diverse in style, background and personality as people who aren't overweight. But on the small screen, fat people get shrunk into the same stereotypes.

Read more

11:00am

Fri August 5, 2011
NPR Story

Job Growth In Health, Retail and Manufacturing

The private sector created 154,000 jobs. There was growth in health, retail and manufacturing. But governments cut 37,000 jobs, and a lot of those were the result of the government shutdown in Minnesota. Steve Inskeep gets the latest from NPR's Tamara Keith.

10:32am

Fri August 5, 2011
Economy

More Jobs Created Than Economists Expceted

Originally published on Fri August 5, 2011 11:11 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Read more

10:10am

Fri August 5, 2011
Economy

Bargain Hunting Maybe Sending U.S. Stocks Up

The fears underlying yesterday's big selloff remain — however, and that's concern over the U.S. economy, and Europe's debt crisis,

8:10am

Fri August 5, 2011
Economy

Unemployment Numbers For July Out Friday

Steve Inskeep talks with NPR's Yuki Noguchi about the latest unemployment data from the federal government.

6:53am

Fri August 5, 2011
Strange News

Thief In N.H. Returns Stolen Items, Apologizes

Last month, a New Hampshire man stole a wallet from a woman's shopping cart, taking $90 and a GPS navigation device. Days later, the man knocked on the woman's door, having also found her address. He said he was sorry as he returned the items. Police say if they find him, they'll arrest him anyway.

6:47am

Fri August 5, 2011
Strange News

Thanks To Monks, Lobsters Avoid Pot, Return To Sea

To celebrate Wheel Turning Day, a group of Tibetan Monks in Massachusetts bought more than 500 lobsters destined for large pots of boiling water and put them in the cool waters of the Atlantic instead. The holiday commemorates Buddha's first sermon, when he spoke of karma; good deeds performed on this day are multiplied.

5:00am

Fri August 5, 2011
Crime In The City

P.I. Kelly: Hot On The Trail Of Crime In Chicago

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 11:10 am

Michael Harvey's novels focus on cop-turned-P.I. Michael Kelly and his life and work in the Windy City.
Citizen Erased! via Flikr

Michael Harvey has had a panoply of careers. He's been a lawyer and an investigative journalist; he's co-creator of A&E's real-cop TV series, Cold Case Files; and, these days, Harvey is also writing crime novels that show off the grit and the glitz of Chicago.

Read more

6:52am

Thu August 4, 2011
Sports

Tennis Player Turns Up In Right City, Wrong State

Originally published on Thu August 4, 2011 7:10 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

At age 19, Bojana Jovanovski is a veteran traveler - the world's 53rd-ranked tennis player. She picked up plane tickets for this week's Mercury Insurance Open in Carlsbad. After several plane changes, she arrived in Carlsbad, New Mexico. And she found herself standing at the airport with her luggage all alone. Only when she called to ask why her ride didn't pick her up did she find the tournament was in Carlsbad, California.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

6:46am

Thu August 4, 2011
Strange News

Escaped Peacock In N.Y. Spawns Rival Twitter Feeds

There were two Twitter feeds arguing over which was being written by the real peacock that escaped from a New York City zoo Tuesday: BirdOnTheTown and CentralPeacock. The squawking quickly became moot; the missing peacock flew back to the Central Park Zoo on Wednesday morning.

5:00am

Thu August 4, 2011
Crime In The City

A Former Cop Sets His Crime Scene In Seattle

Originally published on Wed August 10, 2011 12:17 pm

throw fish. But in the late 1970s, the market was a dicier place. And Lowen Clausen — a Seattle cop turned Seattle crime writer — would know." href="/post/former-cop-sets-his-crime-scene-seattle" class="noexit lightbox">
Today, Seattle's Pike Place Market is a bustling tourist spot — where visitors come to buy lattes at the original Starbucks and watch vendors throw fish. But in the late 1970s, the market was a dicier place. And Lowen Clausen — a Seattle cop turned Seattle crime writer — would know.
papalars via Flickr

Seattle would seem the ideal setting for noir crime novels, what with the rain, the port and the gloomy Scandinavians. But it's not as noir as it used to be. J.B. Dickey, owner of the Seattle Mystery Book Shop, says downtown Seattle was once a lot seedier. "It was more about sailors on leave and tattoo joints," he says. "And the Donut Shop!"

The Donut Shop? Tres noir, says Dickey. "People who were here during the '70s remember the Donut Shop as being a very notorious place."

Read more

4:59am

Thu August 4, 2011
Politics

Debt Deal May Erode Independent Support For Obama

During Washington's heated debate over the debt ceiling, President Obama and others in the administration canceled several campaign fundraisers as work on a compromise dragged on. But Wednesday night, Obama, who turns 50 Thursday, went out raising money at a pair of birthday-themed events in Chicago. The election is a long way off, but the country's long-term financial obligations seem certain to become a prime issue.

Read more

4:00am

Thu August 4, 2011
NPR Story

Airlines Poised To Profit From FAA Shutdown

Airlines have been struggling this summer because of higher oil prices. Now they're getting a windfall profit thanks to Congress. Although they don't have to pay aviation taxes during the partial FAA shutdown, they have not lowered fares accordingly; they're keeping the difference. NPR's Mandalit del Barco reports.

10:58am

Wed August 3, 2011
Economy

FAA Operation Up In The Air Amid Shutdown

A partial shutdown of the Federal Aviation Administration, prompted by a political dispute, is adding to the country's debt. This month alone, that shutdown will cost the Treasury $1 billion in uncollected airline ticket taxes.

The shutdown is happening because of a labor dispute, a long-standing rivalry and a disagreement over subsidizing small airports. It's not clear when it will all be resolved now that members of Congress are leaving Washington, D.C., for their summer recess.

NPR's Renee Montagne talks to NPR's Brian Naylor about what's behind the standoff.

Read more

10:00am

Wed August 3, 2011
U.S.

FAA Operations Up In The Air Amid Shutdown

Originally published on Wed August 3, 2011 1:42 pm

A fence secures the perimeter of a half-completed 236-foot FAA control tower at Oakland International Airport. Construction has been halted because of the FAA shutdown.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

A partial shutdown of the Federal Aviation Administration, prompted by a political dispute, is adding to the country's debt. This month alone, that shutdown will cost the Treasury $1 billion in uncollected airline ticket taxes.

The shutdown is happening because of a labor dispute, a long-standing rivalry and a disagreement over subsidizing small airports. It's not clear when it will all be resolved now that members of Congress are leaving Washington, D.C., for their summer recess.

NPR's Renee Montagne talks to NPR's Brian Naylor about what's behind the standoff.

Read more

7:45am

Wed August 3, 2011
Politics

Sen. Reid Issues Warning To GOP On Taxes

Steve Inskeep reports on Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid's remarks about possible taxes in an interview on Tuesday's All Things Considered.

6:14am

Wed August 3, 2011
U.S.

Woman Treks The Appalachian In Record 46 Days

People sometimes spend six months hiking the Appalachian trail, but Jennifer Pharr Davis hiked the whole thing in record time: from Maine to Georgia in just under 46 1/2 days, beating the old record by about a day. She walked more than 2,000 miles, about 47 miles per day — and spotted 36 bears.

6:11am

Wed August 3, 2011
Strange News

Jordan's King Funds Star Trek Theme Park

Longtime fan King Abdullah II is putting up $1.5 billion for the Star Trek-themed park, beckoning fellow Trekkies to a place where few have gone before: a town on the Red Sea. It's a new frontier for a king who's actually been on board the starship USS Voyager — during a cameo on the show in the '90s.

5:00am

Wed August 3, 2011
Economy

Debt-Ceiling Deal Does Little For Global Economic Ills

With the fight over the U.S. debt ceiling finally over, investors are free again to focus on all the economic challenges that lie ahead, but they are finding little reason to celebrate. Stock markets around the world fell sharply on Tuesday, skipping the "relief rally" that customarily follows the resolution of a crisis.

In the United States, signs of a serious economic slowdown had been building up, though with attention focused on the debt-ceiling debate, the news had apparently not yet sunk in.

Read more

5:00am

Wed August 3, 2011
National Security

Pentagon Could See Deep Cuts In Debt Deal

For several GOP lawmakers, the decision on whether to vote for the debt deal hinged on how the prescribed cuts will affect defense spending. In the end, enough Republicans in the House put their concerns about cutting the deficit over their concerns about cutting defense spending.

But no one really knows how much the Pentagon will have to cut as a result of the deal or when.

"We are in uncharted territory here," said David Berteau, an expert on budgetary issues with the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

Read more

4:00am

Wed August 3, 2011
NPR Story

Business News

Steve Inskeep has this morning's business news.

4:00am

Wed August 3, 2011
NPR Story

Economist In Japan Eyes Effects Of U.S. Debt Debate

Steve Inskeep talks with Richard Koo, chief economist with the Nomura Research Institute, about debt ceilings, deficits and viewing the U.S. debate from Japan.

4:00am

Wed August 3, 2011
NPR Story

U.S. Auto Market Lags Along With Honda, Toyota Sales

The big three automakers continue to see growth in their recovery but last month sales hit a bit of a bump. The overall U.S. market was dragged down by sluggish sales of Hondas and Toyotas. Companies are still struggling to work out problems with their supply chains following Japan's earthquake and tsunami in March. NPR's Sonari Glinton reports.

10:00am

Tue August 2, 2011
Economy

In Europe, Asia, Stocks Fall Amid U.S. Economy Worries

Later today, President Obama is expected to sign the bill to avert a U.S. debt default. Despite Obama's actions, there is still concern the U.S. credit rating could be downgraded.

8:21am

Tue August 2, 2011
Analysis

Compromise In Congress: Does System Work After All?

Just a few days ago, the political system seemed completely stuck as the Aug. 2 debt-default deadline approached. Now the deadline has arrived, and it seems likely that President Obama will sign a debt limit extension. NPR's Ron Elving talks with Steve Inskeep about the path Congress took to get to the agreement.

4:59am

Tue August 2, 2011
Crime In The City

Taking On Crime In A Racially Divided D.C.

George Pelecanos' 17 crime novels take place in and around Washington, D.C. Pelecanos has also written for HBO's The Wire and Treme, which take place in Baltimore and New Orleans, but he says his novels will always be set in D.C.
Mai-Trang Dang via Flickr

All 17 of George Pelecanos' crime novels have been set in his hometown of Washington, D.C. — but he isn't writing about politicians, lawyers or lobbyists. Instead, Pelecanos' stories look at the city's greasers and drug dealers; its working black families and its ethnic neighborhoods.

Read more

10:36am

Mon August 1, 2011
NPR Story

Market Relief Maybe Temporary Despite Debt Relief

Some analysts say the U.S. and its debt is still likely to be downgraded by credit rating agencies, because of the state of the economy.

4:59am

Mon August 1, 2011
Books News & Features

Brattleboro: Vermont's Hotbed Of Fictional Crime

Archer Mayor exposes the seedy underbelly of Brattleboro, Vt., in his mystery novels. But it's a challenge to bring out the dark side; Brattleboro, and Vermont in general, the author says, are "inordinately pleasant" places.
Ken Gallager

Brattleboro, Vt., is a bucolic town — pricked with picturesque church steeples — and home to a vibrant arts community. So it's an unlikely setting for gruesome murder and gritty crime, but that's just what goes on in Archer Mayor's Brattleboro-based Joe Gunther detective series.

Read more

1:37pm

Fri July 29, 2011
Politics

How Debt Ceiling Talks Play Out On Wall Street

Wall Street Journal economics editor David Wessel talks about where we are in terms of the U.S. credit rating and whether it may be downgraded.

Pages