Morning Edition on WEKU

Weekdays 5-9am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

Local Anchor(s): 
Stu Johnson
Local Host(s): 
Bryan Bartlett
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5102dd06e1c8ff994aa73fae|5102dce9e1c8ff994aa73f86

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4:00am

Wed August 10, 2011
Business

Fed Vows To Keep Interest Rates Near Zero

The Federal Reserve has announced it will hold short-term interest rates near zero until 2013 — a highly unusual -decision. Renee Montagne talks to David Wessel of "The Wall Street Journal" about what yesterday's Fed announcement means for markets and the economy.

4:00am

Wed August 10, 2011
NPR Story

While London Calms, Riots Spread Across UK

There were 10,000 more police officers out on the streets of London Tuesday night. They are trying to stop days of rioting. Gangs of youths have attacked police, burnt buildings and looted stores in escalating violence since Saturday night.

4:00am

Wed August 10, 2011
NPR Story

Stumbling Economy Translates To Stock Volatility

Standard and Poor's downgrade of the U.S. credit rating — coupled with increasing economic uncertainty — is making investors nervous. Stocks on Wall Street have been volatile. Steve Inskeep talks to billionaire investor Wilbur Ross about his thoughts about the nature of the economy.

4:00am

Wed August 10, 2011
NPR Story

British MP Remembers Riots Nearly 30 Years Ago

London's riots grew after a peaceful vigil outside Tottenham police station spiraled out of control. Twenty-six years ago, a similar riot in the area sparked a lasting debate about policing and social integration in Britain. Steve Inskeep talks to David Lammy, a life-long resident of Tottenham and its Member of Parliament, about the social and economic problems within his community.

4:00am

Wed August 10, 2011
Business

News Corp. Board Meets After Phone-Hacking Scandal

The News Corp. board of directors met in Los Angeles Tuesday. It was the first time they had gotten together since the phone-hacking scandal that has roiled its British holdings.

11:30pm

Tue August 9, 2011
Music Interviews

Noah And The Whale: A Folk-Pop Band, Forever In Flux

Success hasn't come easily for Noah and the Whale, whose sound has changed constantly from album to album.
Courtesy of the artist

Noah and the Whale has inspired a devoted following ever since its first album landed in the British Top 10 in 2008. But success hasn't come easily for the group: Key members have left, prompting striking changes in Noah and the Whale's sound. In a span of just three years, it's released three very different albums.

"You need to be sort of brave, I guess, when you make a record," says Charlie Fink, the band's singer, guitarist and co-founder.

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10:24am

Tue August 9, 2011
NPR Story

Another Wild Ride For U.S. Stock Markets

Renee Montagne talks with NPR's Tamara Keith about the latest developments in the U.S. financial markets.

8:10am

Tue August 9, 2011
Business

Global Markets Are Dragged Down By Fear

An early rally proved short-lived as stocks in Asia and Europe sank again Tuesday. Justin Urquhart Stewart of Seven Investment Management talks to Renee Montagne about the continued slide of financial markets around the world.

7:25am

Tue August 9, 2011
Business

Lingering Laptop Users Wear Out Starbucks Welcome

Some Starbucks in New York have started blocking their electrical outlets. They want to set a time limit on customers with laptops. Starbucks offers WiFi access and some customers complain they can never find a seat because students, freelance workers and others sit there all day.

7:08am

Tue August 9, 2011
Around the Nation

Nonagenarian Earns Judo's 10th Degree Black Belt

Sensei Keiko Fukuda of San Francisco has became the first woman to earn a 10th degree black belt in judo. She is 98 years old. Only three others have this martial arts' highest ranking: all men living in Japan.

7:01am

Tue August 9, 2011
Business

Ticket Sales Are Down At U.S. Theaters

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

This summer, three movies each it made over $1 billion worldwide. They were all sequels from major franchises: "Harry Potter," "Transformers" and "Pirates of the Caribbean." For the movie industry, generally, though, it's anything but high times. Attendance is down. DVD sales continued to drop sharply, and a high-profile project, the adaptation of Stephen King's "The Dark Tower," with big movie makers Ron Howard and Brian Grazer, was jettisoned by a studio, fearful of what it would cost.

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6:52am

Tue August 9, 2011
Politics

U.S. Can No Longer Afford To Be World's Policemen

Massachusetts Rep. Barney Frank, the senior Democrat on the House Financial Services Committee, talks to Steve Inskeep about his opinion on the S&P credit downgrade. Frank says the U.S. spends too much money being the military policemen of the world.

6:43am

Tue August 9, 2011
Business

Diaper Business Does Well In Down Economy

Crystal White has a booming business selling cloth diapers, in part because of the way she sells them: diaper parties. Similar to Tupperware parties, parents can touch, see and feel the diapers as well as learn how to get over the "ick" factor. White can also thank consumer belt-tightening from the recession for renewed interest in cloth. But the down economy has made it harder for her to grow her business in other ways.

6:34am

Tue August 9, 2011
Economy

Asian Financial Markets Continue Selling Shares

After a day of dramatic plunges, world financial markets began to stabilize. Investors remain on edge amid fears of a possible global recession. Wall Street closed lower Monday-- it's sixth worst decline in the last 112 years. Robert Cookson, Asian markets correspondent for the Financial Times, talks to Renee Montagne about the markets.

6:27am

Tue August 9, 2011
Europe

London Faces 3 Straight Nights Of Arson, Looting

London saw the worst violence and disorder in decades Monday night. It was the third night of unrest in that city. Trouble is also spreading to other parts of Britain – to Birmingham, Liverpool and Bristol. Prime Minister David Cameron has cut short his vacation in Italy to try to deal with the crisis.

4:00am

Tue August 9, 2011
Economy

U.S. Credit Downgrade Leaves 'Horrible Impact'

Steve Inskeep talks to former Republican Senator Alan Simpson of Wyoming about the S&P downgrade of U.S. credit. Simpson has been saying that he hopes the S&P downgrade will cause lawmakers to take deficit deliberations more seriously. Simpson was one of the chairmen of President Obama's deficit reduction commission,

4:00am

Tue August 9, 2011
Middle East

Syria's Allies Want Crackdown On Protesters Curtailed

Diplomats from several countries are in Syria to make an appeal to end the government's violent crackdown there. It's been five months of violence and the government continues to launch new attacks. Renee Montagne talks to Christopher Phillips, Syria analyst for the Economist Intelligence Unit, about the Syrian military's latest assaults.

4:00am

Tue August 9, 2011
Economy

Business In Spain Have A Tough Time Getting Credit

The latest phase of the European debt crisis was sparked by a fear that the troubles plaguing Greece, Portugal and Ireland would spread to Spain and Italy. Spain has been struggling for more than two years with an unemployment rate above 20 percent — the highest in Europe.

12:01am

Tue August 9, 2011
Commentary

Hollywood Superheroes Losing The Fight For Diversity

Ryan Reynolds plays Hal Jordon in this year's Green Lantern.
Warner Brothers

The big budget disappointment Green Lantern was about a superhero whose powers were only limited by his imagination. But I kind of get the feeling that Hollywood's earning powers are being limited by its lack of imagination.

Consider the box office potential if movie producers had been as bold as Marvel's Ultimate Comics Spider-Man series when it introduced Miles Morales — a part black, part Hispanic teen — as the new Spider-man.

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11:00am

Mon August 8, 2011
Music

The Vaccines Make A Music Video With Your Concert Photos

The Vaccines
Courtesy of the artist

The Vaccines, a London-based indie rock band with a retro sound, are partnering up with popular photo app Instagram to make a crowdsourced music video for their song "Wetsuit." They're asking fans to share photos from the band's summer tour using the app on their smartphones.

Vaccines guitarist Freddie Cowan, guitarist for The Vaccines, says he's already seen a huge response: "Pictures of people on their campsites and people covered in mud in England or people in the sun in Europe. And candid shots of us."

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10:37am

Mon August 8, 2011
Economy

U.S. Markets Drop After S&P Downgrade

Investors reacted to Standard & Poor's downgrade of American credit by selling off U.S. stocks. Monday was the first trading day since S&P downgraded the U.S. government's credit rating on Friday.

10:25am

Mon August 8, 2011
Economy

U.S. Stocks Fall On Downgrade Of U.S. Credit

U.S. markets have opened for the first time since Standard and Poor's downgraded the nation's credit rating. The Dow Jones industrial average fell more than 250 points minutes after the opening bell on Wall Street.

7:14am

Mon August 8, 2011
Business

Ingenuity Keeps U.S. Patent Office Busy

On this date 100 years ago, the U.S. Patent Office awarded its millionth patent. The first patent was issued in 1863. In the coming weeks, the patent office says it will have issued 8 million patents.

7:08am

Mon August 8, 2011
Middle East

World's Tallest Building To Be Built In Saudi Arabia

Kingdom Holding Company plans to finish the world's tallest building in Jiddah, Saudi Arabia. It would dwarf the Empire State Building and the current record holder which is in Dubai. The new building would climb 3,200 feet into the air but the developer did not say exactly when construction starts.

7:00am

Mon August 8, 2011
Around the Nation

Pioneer Preacher Smith Remembered In Deadwood

South Dakota is home to one of the most recognizable monuments in the world: Mount Rushmore. But there are dozens of other lesser known physical testimonies to men and women across the state. As part of our summer road trip series, "Honey Stop The Car!," reporter Jim Kent takes us to Deadwood, where there's a tribute to a preacher who didn't live long in that Wild West town.

6:48am

Mon August 8, 2011
Asia

Japan Rethinks Its Relationship With The Atom

Over the weekend, Japan commemorated the 66th anniversary of the American bombing of Hiroshima. Some used the event to protest nuclear energy. This spring's massive earthquake caused a meltdown at a nuclear plant north of Tokyo. The recent disaster has many Japanese re-thinking their nation's relationship with nuclear energy.

6:40am

Mon August 8, 2011
Economy

Asian Markets Slide On U.S. Credit Downgrade

Originally published on Mon August 8, 2011 8:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Let's stay now with the economic fallout from the downgrade of the U.S. credit rating as well as troubled economies in Europe. That's caused markets in Asia to plunge today. NPR's Anthony Kuhn joins us from Jakarta, Indonesia to talk about all of this. And Anthony, how bad is the carnage on those Asian markets?

ANTHONY KUHN: Well, stock markets in the region are down about two to five percent, which means billions of value were wiped off of them. That's on top of last week, which saw the biggest rout in Asian stock since 2008.

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6:34am

Mon August 8, 2011
Economy

Economists Share Thoughts On Credit Downgrade

Turmoil in the financial markets has coincided with an annual fishing trip for economists and top executives deep in the woods of Maine near the Canadian border. While the economists were together, Standard and Poor's took the unprecedented step of downgrading the U.S. government's credit rating.

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4:00am

Mon August 8, 2011
NPR Story

Spaniards Learn German In Hopes Of Getting A Job

With Hollywood movies dubbed over in Spanish and steadfast trade with Latin America, Spaniards haven't needed to be bilingual until now. Globalization and a recession have sparked a run on language classes in Spain. But it's not English proficiency they're after. German academies are seeing a surge in enrollment, as Spaniards look northward for jobs in Europe's strongest economy.

4:00am

Mon August 8, 2011
NPR Story

Business News

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