Morning Edition on WEKU

Weekdays 5-9am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

Local Anchor(s): 
Stu Johnson
Local Host(s): 
Bryan Bartlett
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5102dd06e1c8ff994aa73fae|5102dce9e1c8ff994aa73f86

Pages

12:01am

Tue October 18, 2011
Tina Brown's Must-Reads

Tina Brown's Must Reads: The Republican Schism

Daily Beast Editor-in-Chief Tina Brown

Tina Brown, editor of The Daily Beast and Newsweek, tells us what she's been reading in a feature that Morning Edition likes to call Word of Mouth.

This week, Brown says the media is taking a closer look at the gap between the Republican establishment and the Tea Party. "There's a kind of fire bomb that's about to go off when the debt talks again resume," she says.

The Republicans Are 'Playing With Fire'

Read more

7:17am

Mon October 17, 2011
Games & Humor

Centenarian Sets Marathon Record In Toronto

Over the weekend, Fauja Singh became the oldest person to complete a marathon. He is 100. Singh said he was "overjoyed" at finishing in just over eight hours. Toronto was his eighth marathon. He ran his first at age 89.

7:10am

Mon October 17, 2011
Around the Nation

90-Year-Old Kansas Woman Fulfills Sorority Dream

In 1941, Bertie McConnell attended rush parties for Zeta Tau Alpha sorority at Washburn University in Topeka, Kan. But then World War Two intervened, and she left college to work at an ammunition plant. Decades later, her daughter was a teacher at the same university, and shared her mother's story in class. Members of the sorority responded by inviting Bertie McConnell to become a pledge at age 90.

4:00am

Mon October 17, 2011
NPR Story

Obama Helps Dedicate Memorial To Martin Luther King Jr.

President Obama spoke at the long-delayed dedication of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial on Sunday. Almost 50 years after the March on Washington, Obama said, barricades and bigotry have come down. But the nation still faces severe economic challenges and too many neighborhoods with too little hope.

4:00am

Mon October 17, 2011
NPR Story

Indy Champ Wheldon Dies In Las Vegas Speedway Crash

Originally published on Mon October 17, 2011 5:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The world of IndyCar racing has lost one of its stars. Two-time Indianapolis 500 winner Dan Wheldon was killed yesterday during an IndyCar race in Las Vegas. Wheldon was trailing a pack of cars when he was unable to avoid a massive pile-up.

(SOUNDBITE OF BROADCAST)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Oh, here we go. (Unintelligible) a huge crash. Up at turn number two. Oh, multiple cars involved.

Read more

4:00am

Mon October 17, 2011
NPR Story

Americans Urged To Reconsider Use Of Dietary Supplements

There's been an explosion in the number of Americans who take vitamins and other dietary supplements. But do they do any good? And might they actually be doing harm? Two new studies raise serious questions.

4:00am

Mon October 17, 2011
Middle East

Egyptians Fear Arab Spring Progress Is Slipping Away

Steve Inskeep talks to best-selling Egyptian novelist and political activist Alaa Al Aswany about whether the Arab Spring gains are being eroded by Islamists and the military.

4:00am

Mon October 17, 2011
Around the Nation

Pebble Mine Development Polarizes Alaska

In southwest Alaska, officials are counting votes on a controversial initiative to stop an open-pit copper and gold mine. If passed, the initiative could stop the developers from getting permits they need to start digging at Pebble Mine. The mine's location, near the spawning grounds for the largest sockeye salmon runs in the world, worries conservation groups, commercial fishermen and sport fishers. Daysha Eaton of member station KDLG reports.

4:00am

Mon October 17, 2011
Business

Business News

Ed Chan was president and chief executive of Walmart China for the last five years, overseeing the retailer's rapid expansion in the China market. Walmart says Chan's resignation, and the departure of another executive in China, are for personal reasons, and are not related to a food labeling scandal the company is facing right now.

4:00am

Mon October 17, 2011
Business

London Philharmonic Plays Music To Gamers' Ears

Reaching out to younger audiences, and perhaps just for some fun, the London Philharmonic is releasing the album "The Greatest Video Game Music." It's orchestral versions of well-known video game melodies. The album includes the theme song for Supermario.

4:00am

Mon October 17, 2011
Economy

Occupy Wall Street Protests Spread To Europe

Originally published on Mon October 17, 2011 6:27 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Cleanup is under way in cities around the world after a weekend of protests. Tens of thousands of people turned out. They protested greedy bankers, inept politicians, government austerity, the growing gap between rich and poor, and above all, the system that runs the global economy.

There was some violence in Rome, dozens of arrests. Other places were more peaceful. And in London on this Monday, the protests are still going on. So let's talk about that and more with NPR's Philip Reeves, who's on the line. Hi, Philip.

Read more

12:01am

Mon October 17, 2011
Author Interviews

Whitehead's 'Zone' Is No Average Zombie Apocalypse

Originally published on Mon October 17, 2011 5:20 am

Colson Whitehead is also the author of The Intuitionist, John Henry Days, Apex Hides the Hurt and Sag Harbor.

Erin Patrice O'Brien Doubleday

If you ask Colson Whitehead to describe the man at the center of his new novel, Zone One, he'll tell you: "It's about a guy just trying to make it to the next day without being killed — so it's about New Yorkers."

But character Mark Spitz isn't just any New Yorker. He's one of the only human survivors of a mysterious plague that has swept the world, turning billions of people into zombies. New York is devastated and Spitz is charged with clearing the undead from lower Manhattan.

Read more

7:34am

Fri October 14, 2011
Europe

Touring In Scotland, Bob Dylan Buys Bagpipes

Scotland's National Piping Center reports that Bob Dylan doesn't know how to play the bagpipes. But a spokesperson says "he's always wanted to learn."

7:25am

Fri October 14, 2011
Around the Nation

Police Chase Down Toll Cheating Trucker

Port Authority police say Nelson Vaquiz tried an ingenious way to avoid the toll for trucks crossing the George Washington Bridge into New York. They say as Vaquiz drove through a gateless toll lane, he pulled on a cable that flipped up his license plate so cameras couldn't read it.

6:55am

Fri October 14, 2011
Movies

The Dancing Is Hotter In 'Footloose' 2011

As long as daughters pout when fathers proclaim, "I don't want you to see that boy," Footloose will endure. As long as kids want to dance and Hollywood wants to profit from that passion, it will do more than endure. It will be remade.

6:50am

Fri October 14, 2011
Fine Art

'A Fisherman's Daughter' Returned To Rightful Owner

During World War One, German troops stole a painting from a French museum. Nearly a century later, "A Fisherman's Daughter" by French artist Jules Breton has been returned to the government of France.

6:45am

Fri October 14, 2011
Photography

Debts Resolved, Annie Leibovitz Opens New Exhibit

Annie Leibovitz has shot some of the world's most famous portraits — from John Lennon to President Obama. And yet she risked losing ownership of her works to pay off a loan. That was 2009. Leibovitz says she's learned her lesson and is on better financial footing. She's opened a new exhibit in Russia.

4:00am

Fri October 14, 2011
NPR Story

The Last Word In Business

Steve Inskeep has the Last Word in business.

4:00am

Fri October 14, 2011
NPR Story

Ala. Immigration Law Has Potential Workers Leaving The State

Alabama business owners are furious about the state's new immigration law. They say it is costing them business. Some wonder if the state will ultimately change the law, which is leading legal and illegal immigrants to flee the state.

4:00am

Fri October 14, 2011
NPR Story

Scott Simon To Interview Herman Cain

Steve Inskeep has a preview of Scott Simon's upcoming interview with Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain.

4:00am

Fri October 14, 2011
Business

Romney Pledges To Take On Unfair Business Practices

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney took on U.S. trade policy during a speech yesterday at the Microsoft campus in Redmond, Washington. From member station KUOW in Seattle, Amy Radil reports.

4:00am

Fri October 14, 2011
Business

Business News

Steve Inskeep has business news.

12:01am

Fri October 14, 2011
Politics

Trade Deals May Alienate Some Obama Supporters

This steel plant in Weirton, W.Va., was idled in 2009. The United Steelworkers union worries that a trade deal signed this week could result in more jobs lost.

Rick Gershon Getty Images

President Obama had a rare bipartisan economic success this week when Congress passed three trade deals.

Obama is going to Detroit on Friday with South Korean President Lee Myung-bak to take a victory lap. But some important parts of Obama's base are not fans of these deals — with South Korea, Panama and Colombia — which could have political consequences for the president.

Friday's event is at a General Motors plant. The auto industry and its workers are big fans of the free-trade deal with South Korea, so they're sure to give the world leaders a warm welcome.

Read more

2:04pm

Thu October 13, 2011
U.S.

Hedge Fund Manager Rajaratnam Sentenced To 11 Years

Raj Rajaratnam was once one of the wealthiest hedge fund managers in the world. Now, the former billionaire and Galleon Group co-founder faces 11 years in prison for his role in an insider trading case. A judge in Manhattan handed out the sentence Thursday morning.

10:00am

Thu October 13, 2011
Africa

Libyan Arms Flow Into Egypt Across Northern Sinai

Originally published on Thu October 13, 2011 2:04 pm

Ali Madaan, 45, is one of the Bedouin guards protecting the al-Midan station in Egypt's northern Sinai. The natural gas pipeline there has come under repeated attacks.

Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson NPR

The Sinai Peninsula has proven a major security headache for Egypt's military rulers since a popular uprising ousted President Hosni Mubarak eight months ago.

Gunmen who crossed over the border into Israel from southern Sinai killed eight civilians in August. In northern Sinai, unknown assailants have repeatedly attacked a natural gas pipeline feeding Israel and Jordan.

But what ultimately may prove more problematic for Egyptian authorities is the growing number of northern Sinai residents who are arming themselves with heavy weapons coming in from Libya.

Read more

7:24am

Thu October 13, 2011
Europe

Runner Confesses To Bus Ride During Race

Rob Sloan finished third in a marathon outside New Castle, England. Spectators saw him running through bushes and jumping on a public bus.

7:14am

Thu October 13, 2011
Around the Nation

Fla. Gov. Rick Scott Slams Anthropology Degrees

Originally published on Thu October 13, 2011 2:04 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Read more

6:28am

Thu October 13, 2011
World

Wall Street Protests Make News Around The World

Originally published on Thu October 13, 2011 2:04 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Here's some other news we are following. The Occupy Wall Street protests have made news around the world including the state-run media in Syria. Syria, facing its own protests, is highlighting American dissatisfaction and now the U.S. Embassy in Syria has responded on its Facebook page.

Read more

4:00am

Thu October 13, 2011
Africa

Libyan Civilians Trapped In The Battle For Sirte

Originally published on Thu October 13, 2011 2:04 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

Rebel fighters now control most of Moammar Gadhafi's hometown. They blasted their way into Sirte during one of the bloodiest battles of Libyan civil war with civilians caught in the middle and accusations of brutality on both sides. NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro was in Sirte yesterday. And we advise you that some people will find the details of her four-minute report disturbing.

Read more

4:00am

Thu October 13, 2011
Politics

Romney Camp Is Slow To Attract Former Bush Donors

Republican donor Ray Washburne was a major contributor to George W. Bush's presidential campaign, and he was the national finance chairman for Tim Pawlenty. But when Pawlenty pulled out of the presidential race, Washburne tells Steve Inskeep that it took some time before deciding to back Mitt Romney's campaign.

Pages