Morning Edition on WEKU

Weekdays 5-9am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

Local Anchor(s): 
Stu Johnson
Local Host(s): 
Bryan Bartlett
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5102dd06e1c8ff994aa73fae|5102dce9e1c8ff994aa73f86

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4:00am

Thu August 11, 2011
Business

Business News

Renee Montagne has business news.

4:00am

Thu August 11, 2011
Economy

France Snared In Debt Crisis Crossfire

Investors have been witnessing big swings on Wall Street as well as Asian and European exchanges. And now France is the latest country caught up in the debt crisis plaguing Europe and the United States. Jonathan Loynes, the chief European economist at Capital Economics in London, talks to Steve Inskeep about the latest financial market movers.

4:00am

Thu August 11, 2011
Sports

NCAA Devises Rescue Plan For Tarnished Sports Programs

Ohio State, Auburn, USC — the NCAA has been faced with violations at a number of big-time college sports programs. NPR's Tom Goldman reports on efforts to remake the enforcement system.

12:01am

Thu August 11, 2011
Author Interviews

Discworld's Terry Pratchett On Death And Deciding

Terry Pratchett began writing the novels of his Discworld fantasy series in 1983. Snuff is the 39th book in the collection.
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

If you've read the Discworld novels by popular fantasy writer Terry Pratchett, you've surely encountered Death. He's an actual character — a skeleton in a black hood who's portrayed as not such a bad guy after all.

So maybe it's not so surprising that at 63, Pratchett — who has been diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's — speaks openly about causing his own death.

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12:01am

Thu August 11, 2011
The Record

Country's New Guard Gets Back To Basics

Originally published on Tue February 26, 2013 5:10 pm

Eric Church, whose Chief topped the Billboard 200 album chart last week and is joined in the top 10 this week by three other country albums.
John Peets Courtesy of Capitol Records

7:43am

Wed August 10, 2011
Strange News

Bats Drive Scottish Woman From Her Home

A woman in Scotland fled her new home when more than 1,000 bats moved in with her. The final straw was when she found one bat in her towel after a shower. Bats are a protected species in Britain, so it won't be easy to evict the unwanted guests.

7:38am

Wed August 10, 2011
Strange News

The Mona Lisa Takes Her Coffee With Cream

Australians created a work of art that can keep you awake. At a festival in Sydney, they re-created the Mona Lisa using coffee. They placed 3,000 cups of coffee on the ground in a giant rectangle. And they created different shades in the black-and-white image by adding different amounts of milk to each cup.

6:42am

Wed August 10, 2011
Africa

Libya's Defacto Government Is Being Reorganized

In Libya's rebel east, the defacto government has been disbanded in reaction to the killing of the rebel army chief of staff. It's the latest sign of political disarray and divisions in the rebel camp. NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports.

6:38am

Wed August 10, 2011
World

Yemen Tribesmen Protect Anti-Government Protesters

The Yemeni city of Taiz was the first to see mass sit-ins by protesters opposed to the country's president. Since security forces shot and killed dozens of protesters in May, tribesmen have been protecting demonstrators, and have regularly clashed with soldiers. It's a formula that's being repeated around Yemen, and one that many believe could push the country into civil war.

6:34am

Wed August 10, 2011
Around the Nation

U.S. To Get New Poet Laureate

Pulitizer Prize winner Philip Levine will be named the country's new poet laureate by the Library of Congress Wednesday. He will succeed W.S. Merwin this fall.

4:00am

Wed August 10, 2011
Business

Business News

Renee Montagne has business news.

4:00am

Wed August 10, 2011
Business

Fed Vows To Keep Interest Rates Near Zero

The Federal Reserve has announced it will hold short-term interest rates near zero until 2013 — a highly unusual -decision. Renee Montagne talks to David Wessel of "The Wall Street Journal" about what yesterday's Fed announcement means for markets and the economy.

4:00am

Wed August 10, 2011
NPR Story

While London Calms, Riots Spread Across UK

There were 10,000 more police officers out on the streets of London Tuesday night. They are trying to stop days of rioting. Gangs of youths have attacked police, burnt buildings and looted stores in escalating violence since Saturday night.

4:00am

Wed August 10, 2011
NPR Story

Stumbling Economy Translates To Stock Volatility

Standard and Poor's downgrade of the U.S. credit rating — coupled with increasing economic uncertainty — is making investors nervous. Stocks on Wall Street have been volatile. Steve Inskeep talks to billionaire investor Wilbur Ross about his thoughts about the nature of the economy.

4:00am

Wed August 10, 2011
NPR Story

British MP Remembers Riots Nearly 30 Years Ago

London's riots grew after a peaceful vigil outside Tottenham police station spiraled out of control. Twenty-six years ago, a similar riot in the area sparked a lasting debate about policing and social integration in Britain. Steve Inskeep talks to David Lammy, a life-long resident of Tottenham and its Member of Parliament, about the social and economic problems within his community.

4:00am

Wed August 10, 2011
Business

News Corp. Board Meets After Phone-Hacking Scandal

The News Corp. board of directors met in Los Angeles Tuesday. It was the first time they had gotten together since the phone-hacking scandal that has roiled its British holdings.

4:00am

Wed August 10, 2011
Business

The Last Word In Business

Steve Inskeep has the Last Word in business.

4:00am

Wed August 10, 2011
Business

Verizon's Wireless, Landline Workers Caught Up In Strike

Verizon landline workers are on strike. They say their service is the bedrock of the company's booming wireless business. They don't want to give up benefits just because they work on a less profitable side of the business now. Management says to stay competitive, the 45,000 landline workers can't be paid as if the company is a monopoly.

4:00am

Wed August 10, 2011
Education

Atlanta's Schools Work Through Cheating Scandal

Students in Atlanta's troubled public school system started classes this week. It follows a year of controversy after dozens of administrators and teachers were found to have cheated on state tests so that students would appear to have made academic gains.

4:00am

Wed August 10, 2011
Science

Scientists Explore Why Single Cells Band Together

NPR's Joe Palca has the findings of a scientific study that explored how multi-cellular organisms evolved.

4:00am

Wed August 10, 2011
Politics

GOP Maintains Control Of Wis. State Senate

Originally published on Wed August 10, 2011 7:17 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

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11:30pm

Tue August 9, 2011
Music Interviews

Noah And The Whale: A Folk-Pop Band, Forever In Flux

Success hasn't come easily for Noah and the Whale, whose sound has changed constantly from album to album.
Courtesy of the artist

Noah and the Whale has inspired a devoted following ever since its first album landed in the British Top 10 in 2008. But success hasn't come easily for the group: Key members have left, prompting striking changes in Noah and the Whale's sound. In a span of just three years, it's released three very different albums.

"You need to be sort of brave, I guess, when you make a record," says Charlie Fink, the band's singer, guitarist and co-founder.

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10:24am

Tue August 9, 2011
NPR Story

Another Wild Ride For U.S. Stock Markets

Renee Montagne talks with NPR's Tamara Keith about the latest developments in the U.S. financial markets.

8:10am

Tue August 9, 2011
Business

Global Markets Are Dragged Down By Fear

An early rally proved short-lived as stocks in Asia and Europe sank again Tuesday. Justin Urquhart Stewart of Seven Investment Management talks to Renee Montagne about the continued slide of financial markets around the world.

7:25am

Tue August 9, 2011
Business

Lingering Laptop Users Wear Out Starbucks Welcome

Some Starbucks in New York have started blocking their electrical outlets. They want to set a time limit on customers with laptops. Starbucks offers WiFi access and some customers complain they can never find a seat because students, freelance workers and others sit there all day.

7:08am

Tue August 9, 2011
Around the Nation

Nonagenarian Earns Judo's 10th Degree Black Belt

Sensei Keiko Fukuda of San Francisco has became the first woman to earn a 10th degree black belt in judo. She is 98 years old. Only three others have this martial arts' highest ranking: all men living in Japan.

7:01am

Tue August 9, 2011
Business

Ticket Sales Are Down At U.S. Theaters

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

This summer, three movies each it made over $1 billion worldwide. They were all sequels from major franchises: "Harry Potter," "Transformers" and "Pirates of the Caribbean." For the movie industry, generally, though, it's anything but high times. Attendance is down. DVD sales continued to drop sharply, and a high-profile project, the adaptation of Stephen King's "The Dark Tower," with big movie makers Ron Howard and Brian Grazer, was jettisoned by a studio, fearful of what it would cost.

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6:52am

Tue August 9, 2011
Politics

U.S. Can No Longer Afford To Be World's Policemen

Massachusetts Rep. Barney Frank, the senior Democrat on the House Financial Services Committee, talks to Steve Inskeep about his opinion on the S&P credit downgrade. Frank says the U.S. spends too much money being the military policemen of the world.

6:43am

Tue August 9, 2011
Business

Diaper Business Does Well In Down Economy

Crystal White has a booming business selling cloth diapers, in part because of the way she sells them: diaper parties. Similar to Tupperware parties, parents can touch, see and feel the diapers as well as learn how to get over the "ick" factor. White can also thank consumer belt-tightening from the recession for renewed interest in cloth. But the down economy has made it harder for her to grow her business in other ways.

6:34am

Tue August 9, 2011
Economy

Asian Financial Markets Continue Selling Shares

After a day of dramatic plunges, world financial markets began to stabilize. Investors remain on edge amid fears of a possible global recession. Wall Street closed lower Monday-- it's sixth worst decline in the last 112 years. Robert Cookson, Asian markets correspondent for the Financial Times, talks to Renee Montagne about the markets.

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