Morning Edition on WEKU

Weekdays 5-9am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

Local Anchor(s): 
Stu Johnson
Local Host(s): 
Bryan Bartlett
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Composer ID: 
5102dd06e1c8ff994aa73fae|5102dce9e1c8ff994aa73f86

Pages

5:00am

Thu November 10, 2011
Poisoned Places: Toxic Air, Neglected Communities

EPA Regulations Give Kilns Permission To Pollute

The Ash Grove Cement Kiln, as seen from an aerial photograph, sits on the northern edge of Chanute, Kan.
David Gilkey NPR

Part three of a four-part series, Poisoned Places: Toxic Air, Neglected Communities.

The smokestack stands more than nine stories above the southeastern Kansas prairie and the small city of Chanute, and it's bright, white flashing lights are like a beacon in the night sky.

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4:46am

Thu November 10, 2011
Business

The Last Word In Business

Renee Montgne has the Last Word in business.

4:00am

Thu November 10, 2011
NPR Story

Jefferson County, Ala., Files For Bankruptcy

Alabama's most populous county has filed the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history. Jefferson County commissioners voted to declare bankruptcy after years of squabbling with creditors over $4 billion in debt.

4:00am

Thu November 10, 2011
NPR Story

Accused Bombing Mastermind Arraigned At Guantanamo

The Obama administration's first attempt to try a Guantanamo detainee in a military commission began Wednesday with the arraignment of the man accused of masterminding the bombing of the U.S.S. Cole. The incident killed 17 servicemen and women in Yemen in 2000. Human rights groups object to trying terrorists in a parallel justice system hundreds of miles off U.S. shores.

4:00am

Thu November 10, 2011
NPR Story

Business News

Steve Inskeep has business news.

4:00am

Thu November 10, 2011
NPR Story

Emails: Solyndra Supporter Pushed White House For Loan

House Republicans have released emails related to solar panel maker Solyndra which got $535 million in government loan guarantees and then went bankrupt. Republicans say the emails show an Obama campaign bundler used his influence at the White House to make the loan happen.

12:01am

Thu November 10, 2011
Fine Art

For Gertrude Stein, Collecting Art Was A Family Affair

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:20 am

The Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

A reunion of art is taking place in Paris right now. Works that haven't been there together in almost a century are reunited once again. The art was collected by writer Gertrude Stein and her brothers starting in the early 1900s. The Steins bought paintings right out of the studios of young avant-garde artists — Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse and others who would become masters as the 20th century progressed.

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7:10am

Wed November 9, 2011
Animals

Why Rain Is Not A Problem For Hummingbirds

Originally published on Thu November 10, 2011 8:44 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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7:06am

Wed November 9, 2011
Business

Holiday Season Expected To Be Good For Pets

Originally published on Thu November 10, 2011 8:44 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. The holiday season will apparently be a good one for pets. A survey finds most pet owners plan to buy their pets a gift. We're not sure what this means for the economy, but people are spending more. They're budgeting $46 - up $5 from last year. Hopefully, a dog named Echo in Hawaii is not listening, since the owner says her dog is getting a toy for Christmas, and her husband is getting a shirt from the dog.

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6:52am

Wed November 9, 2011
Sports

Coach Joe Paterno's Future In Question At Penn State

The Penn State Board of Trustees says it will appoint a special committee to investigate a child sex abuse scandal. This is the case that engulfed the university, its football program and coach Joe Paterno. Former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky is accused of repeatedly sexually abusing young boys over a 15-year period, sometimes in the Penn State locker room.

6:44am

Wed November 9, 2011
Around the Nation

Fla. Utility Customers Pay Now For Future Power

Regulators in Florida recently gave two utilities permission to begin charging customers for nuclear plants that won't be completed for at least a decade. To encourage development of nuclear power, Florida allows utilities to charge customers upfront for the costs. Now here's a movement there to rethink that policy.

6:29am

Wed November 9, 2011
Digital Life

Teen Study: Social Media Is Positive Experience

A study by the Pew Research Center's Internet and American Life Project reveals what teens think about the online experience. While bullying on social media sites like Facebook gets a lot of news coverage, most teens think social networks are a friendly place for them.

4:41am

Wed November 9, 2011
Politics

GOP Wants Pentagon Protected From Automatic Cuts

Originally published on Thu November 10, 2011 8:44 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Counting down, it is now exactly two weeks before the clock runs out for Congress's supercommittee. If its six Democrats and six Republicans fail to reduce deficits by more than a trillion dollars, automatic spending cuts will kick in. Under this process, known as sequestration, the law would require half the cuts to come from defense spending. NPR's David Welna reports.

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4:21am

Wed November 9, 2011
Politics

Cain To Vigorously Defend Harassment Allegations

Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain responded to accusations of sexual harassment at a news conference in Scotsdale, Ariz., Tuesday. Cain say he has "never acted inappropriately with anyone."

4:08am

Wed November 9, 2011
Politics

Personhood Amendment Rejected By Miss. Voters

Originally published on Thu November 10, 2011 8:44 am

Adam and Debbie Browne tried to drum up support Tuesday for a proposed 'personhood' amendment to the Mississippi state constitution that was ultimately rejected by voters.
Rogelio V. Solis AP

Mississippi voters on Tuesday rejected an amendment to their state constitution that would have declared that life begins at fertilization.

The result was somewhat unexpected: As recently as a few weeks ago, the so-called personhood amendment was considered almost certain to pass. Voters in Colorado have twice rejected similar amendments to declare that life begins legally at fertilization, in 2008 and 2010. But Mississippi, with its far more conservative bent, was considered much friendlier territory.

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7:13am

Tue November 8, 2011
History

Satellite Images Reveal Lost City In Libyan Desert

Evidence of the ancient civilization of Garamantes has been buried in the Libyan desert for 1,400 years. Now satellite images and field exploration are giving insight into the pre-Islamic culture.

7:02am

Tue November 8, 2011
Around the Nation

Stranded Travelers Save Samaritan After Heart Attack

Originally published on Tue November 8, 2011 7:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Two women were stranded Saturday night on a Wisconsin highway when a Good Samaritan stopped to change their flat tire. Driving off, the 61-year-old said, Someone up above put me in the right place at the right time. Moments later, the man had a heart attack. The women spotted his car down the road and they pulled over. They told the Star Tribune one called for help, while the other, a nursing assistant, used CPR to save his life. This is MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

6:55am

Tue November 8, 2011
Fine Art

France, England Tussle Over Painting Of Christ

The painting whose title translates to "Christ Carrying the Cross" was completed by French Baroque painter Nicolas Tournier in the 1630s, only to disappear from France in 1818. The canvas turned up in Italy a couple years ago. A gallery in London eventually purchased it and brought it to a showing in Paris. Now the French government is trying to keep the painting saying it was stolen.

6:44am

Tue November 8, 2011
Digital Life

Members Of Anonymous Share Set Of Values

The online group Anonymous was in the news again last week when it threatened to unmask collaborators with a powerful Mexican drug cartel. That is just one of the attention-grabbing exploits by the group of cyber activists that is as mysterious as its name sounds. Journalist Quinn Norton talks to Renee Montagne about the profile of Anonymous that she has written for Wired.com.

6:35am

Tue November 8, 2011
Europe

Debt Burden Weighs Down Economies Of Greece, Italy

Originally published on Tue November 8, 2011 7:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

We're going to get an update now on the struggling economies now threatening the Eurozone. Let's start with Greece, which is still trying to put together a unity government after its embattled prime minister agreed to step down. So far, George Papandreou is still there and Greek lawmakers have not been able to agree on a replacement.

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4:00am

Tue November 8, 2011
NPR Story

4th Woman Accuses Cain Of Sexual Harassment

Originally published on Tue November 8, 2011 7:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

When a Chicago woman came out yesterday to publicly accuse Herman Cain of an unwanted sexual advance, it marked a shift in this story. Up to that point, the three previous accusations had been anonymous. The Republican presidential candidate has firmly denied all the accusations of harassment, including yesterday's, which the woman claimed had occurred in 1997, when Cain was head of the National Restaurant Association.

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4:00am

Tue November 8, 2011
NPR Story

Tea Party Looks To Impact Presidential Election

Republican presidential candidates (from left) Jon Huntsman, Herman Cain, Rep. Michele Bachmann, Mitt Romney, Gov. Rick Perry, Rep. Ron Paul, Newt Gingrich and Rick Santorum prepare to debate during the event sponsored by CNN and the Tea Party Express at the Florida state fairgrounds on Sept. 12 in Tampa.
Win McNamee Getty Images

It was one year ago that the Tea Party movement helped Republicans take control of the U.S. House of Representatives. With the presidential election a year away, the movement finds itself searching for ways to have the same kind of impact this time around.

The Tea Party celebrated on election night last year with candidates like Rand Paul, who captured a Senate seat in Kentucky.

"Tonight there's a Tea Party tidal wave, and we're sending a message to them," Paul said in his victory speech.

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4:00am

Tue November 8, 2011
NPR Story

South Korean Opposition Delays Free Trade Vote

In South Korea, opposition politicians have delayed the ratification of the Free Trade Agreement with the United States. The U.S. Congress has ratified the pact. But in South Korea, thousands of opponents have been holding angry street rallies, and a rising mood of anti-American sentiment is helping their cause.

4:00am

Tue November 8, 2011
Law

Jury Finds Dr. Murray Guilty In Pop Star's Death

Originally published on Tue November 8, 2011 7:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This morning, Dr. Conrad Murray is in a jail here in Los Angeles. Michael Jackson's personal physician was found guilty of involuntary manslaughter yesterday. NPR's Karen Grigsby Bates has been following the trial and has this report.

KAREN GRIGSBY BATES, BYLINE: The downtown courtroom was packed as those present waited as the clerk of the court read the jury's verdict.

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4:00am

Tue November 8, 2011
Business

Business News

Executives from Japanese camera and medical device maker Olympus admitted Tuesday that the company has been using accounting tricks to cover up losses since the 1990s. The announcement comes after a scandal erupted last month.

4:00am

Tue November 8, 2011
Business

Costco Leads Fight To Privatize Wash. Liquor Sales

Voters in Washington state will decide whether to privatize the sale of hard liquor on Tuesday. Currently spirits can be sold only at state-run or contract liquor stores. Retail giant Costco has been pouring money — about $22 million — into advertising in favor of getting the initiative passed.

4:00am

Tue November 8, 2011
Business

Jon Corzine's Appetite For Hair-Raising Challenges

The sudden bankruptcy of commodities trading firm MF Global has thrust a familiar name in to the spotlight: Jon Corzine. Previously, Corzine was governor of New Jersey, a U.S. senator and chairman and CEO of the investment firm Goldman Sachs. Corzine resigned last week as chairman and CEO of MF Global as investigators search for hundreds of millions of dollars missing from clients' accounts.

12:01am

Tue November 8, 2011
Fine Art

Wal-Mart Heiress Brings Art Museum To The Ozarks

A model shows a view of the Crystal Bridges pavilion some museum staff refer to as "the armadillo" because of how its curved, copper bands resemble the animal's shell.
John Horner Crystal Bridges Museum of Art

The American art world's biggest event in decades is happening this week — but it's not where you'd expect it to be.

Bentonville, Ark. is home to Wal-Mart headquarters and, starting Nov. 11, it will also be home to the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, and what some critics are calling one of the world's best collections of American art.

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7:00am

Mon November 7, 2011
Around the Nation

'Times' Cartoonist Draws While Running NYC Marathon

Originally published on Mon November 7, 2011 7:07 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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6:50am

Mon November 7, 2011

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