Morning Edition on WEKU

Weekdays 5-9am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

Local Anchor(s): 
Stu Johnson
Local Host(s): 
Bryan Bartlett
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5102dd06e1c8ff994aa73fae|5102dce9e1c8ff994aa73f86

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4:00am

Mon September 19, 2011
Asia

U.S. Accuses Pakistan Of Harboring Haqqani Network

Originally published on Mon September 19, 2011 6:35 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, host: It's Morning Edition from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene in for Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, host: And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

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4:00am

Mon September 19, 2011
Analysis

Politics In The News

Originally published on Mon September 19, 2011 7:05 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, host: And you heard Scott say part of this is politics. Let's talk about that part with NPR's Cokie Roberts, who joins us most Mondays. Cokie, good morning once again.

COKIE ROBERTS: Hi. Hi, Steve.

INSKEEP: Glad you're with us. Glad you're with us.

ROBERTS: Yes. Good to be with you.

INSKEEP: Now, let's just note a couple of things that Scott said there. Speaker John Boehner said forget about new taxes and a couple of days later, we hear about the president's plan for a millionaires' tax. Why now?

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4:00am

Mon September 19, 2011
Television

'Mad Men,' 'Modern Family' Capture Multiple Emmys

The 1960s Madison Avenue saga Mad Men won its fourth consecutive Emmy Award for Best drama series. Modern Family won its second consecutive trophy for best comedy.

4:00am

Mon September 19, 2011
Europe

Strauss-Kahn Speaks Publicly For The First Time Since Arrest

The former head of the International Monetary Fund has given his first television interview since returning to France after being arrested in May on accusations he sexually assaulted a hotel maid in New York. The charges were dropped but Dominique Strauss Kahn still faces a lawsuit brought by the maid. A French writer also claims he tried to rape her. Eleanor Beardsley reports from Paris.

12:01am

Mon September 19, 2011
Monkey See

NBC's 'Prime Suspect' Hopes To Fill Some Very Big And Very British Shoes

Maria Bello plays Detective Jane Timoney — a revamped version of Helen Mirren's iconic Jane Tennison — in NBC's remake of the British drama Prime Suspect.
Patrick Harbron NBC

When a British television show is remade for an American audience, it usually hews closely to the original, at least at the uncertain beginning, while it fumbles to find its own identity.

The Office found one. Most don't.

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12:01am

Mon September 19, 2011
Krulwich Wonders...

Lucretius, Man of Modern Mystery

Lucretius, circa 55 B.C.
Spencer Arnold Getty Images

Before he became a Professor of literature at Harvard, and way before he wrote his classic Shakespeare biography, Will in The World, Stephen Greenblatt was an I'll-read-anything kind of kid. One day, he was standing in the campus book store, and there, in a bin, selling for ten cents (good price, even in 1961) he noticed a thin, little volume called On the Nature of Things, by a Roman writer named Lucretius.

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7:17am

Fri September 16, 2011
Around the Nation

Big Y Supermarket To Phase Out Self-Checkout Lanes

The self-serve checkout lanes were meant to speed service and save money, but checkout times increased. Cashiers will return, helping people baffled by bar codes, coupons and ways to pay.

7:10am

Fri September 16, 2011
Around the Nation

Grandparents Monkeying With Camera Are Web Stars

Esther and Bruce Huffman were playing with the camera on their new laptop but didn't know millions were about to see it. Their granddaughter posted on YouTube the retired couple's first attempt at uploading video. It went viral.

4:00am

Fri September 16, 2011
NPR Story

Libya's Oil Production To Resume Shortly

Libya is poised to bring its major source of wealth back on line in a matter of days. Oil profits will be vital to a government that has much of its money tied up in frozen overseas assets. The Transitional National Council has said repeatedly it will honor all the contracts made with oil companies by the Gadhafi regime. Critics say those contracts were riddled with corruption.

4:00am

Fri September 16, 2011
Politics

Boehner Commands Supercommitee Not To Raise Taxes

House Speaker John Boehner on Thursday unveiled his own jobs proposal. He also weighed in on President Obama's jobs plan. And in both instances, the Ohio congressman touted one main theme: the need to avoid raising taxes.

4:00am

Fri September 16, 2011
Politics

Politics In The News

Originally published on Fri September 16, 2011 8:23 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Let's talk about politics, the economy and more with NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson, who's on the line.

Mara, good morning.

MARA LIASSON: Good morning Steve.

INSKEEP: Okay, we heard Speaker Boehner's proposals having to do with this supercommittee that's supposed to reduce the deficit. The president takes his swing at this on Monday, right?

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4:00am

Fri September 16, 2011
Asia

Substantial Parts Of Pakistan Are Underwater

Pakistan is dealing with substantial flooding for the second year in a row, leaving hundreds of thousands of people homeless. For the more on the situation, Steve Inskeep talks to Timo Pallkkala, the humanitarian coordinator for the United Nations in Pakistan.

4:00am

Fri September 16, 2011
Business

'Bucky Larson' Is No Box Office Hero

The new movie Bucky Larson: Born to Be a Star, is getting unfavorable reviews — a lot of them. The screenplay was co-written by Adam Sandler. The film has a 0 percent rating on the movie review website Rotten Tomatoes. Sony Studios opened Bucky on about 1,500 screens last weekend. And according to one box office tracking site, each showing had an average audience of just eight.

4:00am

Fri September 16, 2011
Environment

EPA Postpones Power Plant Emissions Rules

The Environmental Protection Agency has decided to delay new rules that would limit emissions of climate-warming gases from power plants. It's the second time this month the EPA has either withdrawn or postponed new pollution rules that industry didn't like.

4:00am

Fri September 16, 2011
Business

Business News

Steve Inskeep has business news.

4:00am

Fri September 16, 2011
Business

Rogue Trader Arrested In Swiss Bank UBS Scandal

Originally published on Fri September 16, 2011 8:23 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, Host:

Already dealing with a debt crisis, Europe's banks are now being rattled by another rogue trading scandal. A 31-year-old trader was arrested yesterday in London after a $2 billion loss was revealed by the Swiss banking giant UBS. Megan Murphy has been following the story very closely, and she's the banking correspondent for The Financial Times newspaper in London, and London is where we reached her. Good morning, Megan.

MEGAN MURPHY: Good morning.

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4:00am

Fri September 16, 2011
Europe

Could Euro Bonds Mend Eurozone Debt Crisis?

As the 17 European countries that use the euro grapple with the sovereign debt crisis, one possible way out is jointly underwritten euro bonds. The debt burden would be jointly shared among the nations that use the euro and stronger economies would help shore up weaker ones. But Germany — Europe's largest economy and main player in the crisis — remains vehemently opposed to the idea.

12:01am

Fri September 16, 2011
Monkey See

Jane Lynch: A Life Of 'Happy Accidents'

Voice

It's a big week for Jane Lynch. Her memoir, Happy Accidents, was released on Tuesday, and this Sunday night, she'll be hosting the Primetime Emmy Awards. And she's a reasonably good bet to pick one up, too: her second in a row for playing the scheming cheerleading coach Sue Sylvester on Fox's Glee. On Friday's Morning Edition, she talks to David Greene about her career, her book, and the difficult process of telling her parents she was gay.

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12:01am

Fri September 16, 2011
Interviews

Memories Of Grandma Silvia, And Slavery's Legacy

Ellaraino (right), spoke about her late grandmother with her friend Baki AnNur at StoryCorps in Los Angeles.
StoryCorps

When she was 16, Ellaraino met her great-grandmother, Silvia, for the first time. And Silvia had plenty of stories to tell. She described being a teenager, much like Ellaraino — and seeing the Civil War, and slavery, come to an end.

That was back in 1955, when Ella Raino's family simply called her Ella. She would later go on to become an actress and storyteller, eventually combining her names into one.

As Ellaraino recalls, her family had several reasons for sending her on a trip. For one thing, she spent a lot of time thinking about her boyfriend — maybe a bit too much.

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7:16am

Thu September 15, 2011
Around the Nation

Maryland Football Uniforms Are Vibrant On Purpose

When the University of Maryland debuted the new uniforms earlier this month, a lot of people didn't like them. The school's athletic director says he intended for you to notice. Many schools create new uniforms in search of a hip image, grabbing the attention of prospective football recruits.

7:10am

Thu September 15, 2011
Business

This Phone Has No Apps But It's Made Of Gold

A Danish phone company just released a mobile phone made of pure gold. It's priced around $60,000. The target market: Russia. Reuters reports the phones have no apps, no camera and no calendar.

4:38am

Thu September 15, 2011
Education

Md. Teachers Must Promote Environmental Literacy

The start of a new school year in Maryland brings a new requirement: All schools in the state must develop plans to promote environmental literacy. The new requirement is creating some challenges for teachers. The goal is to integrate environmental concerns into science, social studies and other topics.

4:00am

Thu September 15, 2011
Economy

Spain's Teachers Protest Contract Changes, Layoffs

The economic crisis in Spain has hit public education where "jobs for life" had been the norm for teachers. As students head back to school, teachers across Spain are demonstrating against layoffs and contract changes.

4:00am

Thu September 15, 2011
Business

The Last Word In Business

David Greene has the Last Word in business.

4:00am

Thu September 15, 2011
Europe

Eurozone Crisis Threatens To Destroy European Union

Originally published on Thu September 15, 2011 6:32 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, host: It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, host: And I'm Steve Inskeep. Pressure is growing on European leaders to do something they've made it really, really plain they hate to do.

GREENE: For all the billions they've committed to propping up the Greek economy, it may still not be enough, and Greece's trouble has led to questions about Italy and even France.

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4:00am

Thu September 15, 2011
Europe

Does The Eurzone Still Make Sense?

David Greene talks to Josef Joffe, editor of the German newspaper "Die Zeit," about whether there are still benefits to the countries that use the euro.

4:00am

Thu September 15, 2011
Economy

Rate Of Homeless Female Vets Rises Near Fort Bragg

Originally published on Thu September 15, 2011 6:54 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, host: More than 200,000 women have served in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. While their numbers are small compared to their male counterparts, many women veterans are facing the same problems finding employment and affordable housing. In Fayetteville, North Carolina, home to the Army's Fort Bragg, the number of homeless female veterans is rising rapidly. Jessica Jones of North Carolina Public Radio reports that many of them are young women with children.

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4:00am

Thu September 15, 2011
Business

Business News

Steve Inskeep has business news.

12:01am

Thu September 15, 2011
Race

Feeling Like A Tourist: Being Black In New England

Originally published on Thu September 15, 2011 1:02 pm

Debra Nunnally Beaupre loves exploring New England's picturesque back roads. But she says she doesn't always find it easy to travel there.
Debra Nunnally Beaupre

I am a New Englander, born and bred, with the accent to prove it. Originally from Massachusetts, I now live in northern New Hampshire, in an area popular with vacationers. However, as a black woman in an overwhelmingly white state, there are times when I feel like a tourist.

Many residents here have never known a person of color. Some want to; others do not. Problem is, when I leave my own small town, it's impossible to know which type I will encounter.

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12:00am

Thu September 15, 2011
Monkey See

The Headline From NY Fashion Week: Print(s) Is Not Dead

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:24 am

A model poses at Mercedes Benz Fashion Week in New York City.
Jesse Lirola Getty Images

Today's the last day of New York Fashion Week, that twice-yearly ritual at which retailers and editors give us a look at what we're going to be craving in spring. Big this year: prints. Whimsical prints.

To get a bead on what looks like a swing back away from minimalism, Morning Edition guest host David Greene talks to Sally Singer, editor-in-chief of T: The New York Times Style Magazine.

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