Eastern Standard

Thursday 11:00 am; Sunday 6pm

WEKU's weekly public affairs program discussing topics and concerns of Central and Southeastern Kentucky, hosted by John Hingsbergen.

Call 800-621-8890 with your questions or comments during the show. You can also email your comments to wekueasternstandard@gmail.com, or post your comments and questions on Facebook and Twitter.  Between shows, you are welcome to leave a comment or question on the WEKU Listener Comment Line at 859-622-1657.   If you allow us to do so, we may use your comments on the air.

We're interested in your questions, comments or personal stories.

NPR media correspondent and author David Folkenflik discusses his book Murdoch's World: The Last of the Old Media Empires (2013 Public Affairs.) 

Richard Turner

Joel Aalberts is nearing his first anniversary as Director of the Eastern Kentucky University Center for the Arts.  The 2014-15 schedule of concerts and other performances will be the first he has put together for the center which opened in 2011. 

 

Memorial Day was intended as a time for honoring our nation's war dead. Today, it's best known as the unofficial start of summer. On this week's show, we'll discuss the holiday and how we can best honor those who've served and given their all.

While the 2014 mid-term election is a half a year away, Kentucky voters will go to the polls this month for a primary election.  On this week's show, we'll discuss the May 20 Primary with journalists covering politics in the Commonwealth.

Among the topics we'll discuss: The competition for the Democratic nomination for the Sixth District U.S. House;  the race for the U.S. Senate seat held by incumbent and House Minority Leader Mitch McConnell; the Lexington Mayoral Race; and any other races of interest to our listeners.

Former NPR newscaster Jean Cochran joins  us for a show recorded before an audience of WEKU listeners. Cochran, who retired from employment with NPR after 33 years, is the special guest at May 7th reception for WEKU Day Sponsors at Lexington's Griffin Gate Marriott Resort and Spa.


Lexington Herald-Leader

  On this week’s show, we'll discuss the downturn in Eastern Kentucky coal mining, other challenges to the mining industry and hopes to rejuvenate or replace this important element of the Commonwealth's economy.

Charles Bertram / Lexington Herald-Leader

  On April 11th, Lexington Mayor Jim Gray named the city's first director of the Office of Homelessness Prevention and Intervention, a newly created office. This comes after the announcement earlier this year that $3 million of the city's $13 million surplus would be allotted for affordable housing and 500,000 for homeless initiatives.

www.noaa.org

  Tuesday April 22 is Earth Day.  This year marks the 45th observance of the annual celebration of our planet and its environment. On this week’s Eastern Standard, we’ll discuss community gardening and other efforts to bring about a sustainable Kentucky.

Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program

  Beginning in the 1940's the U.S. Army stored chemical weapons at the Bluegrass Army Depot near Richmond.  At the order of Congress and in compliance with the international Chemical Weapons Convention, the materials at the site are slated for destruction.

www.hemp.com

 In 2013, Kentucky lawmakers passed a bill creating a regulatory framework for hemp production in the state. This year, thanks to a federal farm bill, six state universities are piloting projects using hemp.  On this week’s Eastern Standard, the future of hemp in Kentucky.

jeancochran.net

An NPR newscaster who helped wake America for 33 years joins us on our next program.  Jean Cochran retired from National Public Radio last year as part of a buy-out offered to many long-time employees at the network.

Capital punishment has been used in the US since Colonial Days, for crimes as varied as murder, theft, sexual perversity or denying the existence of God.

Despite efforts to do away with the death penalty, it is still a legal punishment in 32 states.

Kentucky legislators have before them no fewer than three bills that would allow the state to bring the issue of expanded gambling before voters in the Commonwealth.

On this week’s Eastern Standard, we’ll discuss how  allowing would affect jobs, education, human services, health care, veterans bonuses, local governments and public safety.

From the December SOAR Summit (Shaping Our Appalachian Region) to Federal Promise Zones and recent efforts to improve internet connectivity and expand the Mountain Parkway, the region is on the minds of the governor and legislators at both the state and federal levels.

On this week's Eastern Standard, Economic Development in Eastern Kentucky.

File Photo Lexington HERALD-LEADER

On March 5, 1964, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr, baseball legend Jackie Robinson and Kentucky civil rights leaders led 10,000 people to rally at the Kentucky State Capitol in a peaceful march and demonstration.  Fifty years later, a commemorative march will take place, sponsored by The Kentucky Commission on Human Rights and other members of the Allied Organizations for Civil Rights.

transportation.ky.gov

With record cold temperatures and snow, especially for Kentucky, we're wondering what's going on. And we bet you are, too!   On this week's Eastern Standard, we'll discuss this unusual winter weather and attempt to understand why it's going on, and what to expect as we get closer to spring. 

As the 2014 session of the Kentucky General Assembly approaches the mid-point, what has the state's legislative branch achieved so far this year?  What is likely to be accomplished by the end of this 60-day session?  These are questions we will pursue in this week's show, originating "live" from the State Capitol in Frankfort.

One place where Kentucky ranks among the top ten states is…obesity. One study ranks the Commonwealth as 6th most obese, not far behind 4th place Tennessee and 3rd place West Virginia.

As Bill Nye, the Science Guy gets ready to debate the founder of Kentucky’s Creation Museum, we’ll have our own conversation on the topic on Eastern Standard.

Is teaching creation to children harmful to them and to our society?

Is evolution merely one theory of the earth’s origins and equal to creationism?

Is this topic even worthy of a debate?

Our guests for this show:

Michael Benson, PhD

EKU President Dr. Michael Benson will be with us to give us an update on some of the projects and initiatives he has launched since his arrival last summer and to answer your questions.

Send a question in advance to wekueasternstandard at gmail dot com or call 859-622-1655 or call in “live” during the show.

Over a 100,000 people are injured or killed by gun violence in the US each year.  That’s according to a report commissioned by the Centers for Disease Control.

The report recommends a “public health approach” to preventing future harm and injuries.

On this week’s Eastern Standard, our topic is “preventing gun violence.”  Is it through tougher and more restrictive laws or education and firearms training.

wkms.org

More than 123,000 Kentuckians are now enrolled in new health coverage through the state’s health exchange website, Kynect.   State officials report that, since open enrollment began on Oct. 1, the website has enrolled an average of 1,300 Kentuckians in new health coverage each day. 

In a special holiday program, NPR media correspondent and author David Folkenflik discusses his book Murdoch's World: The Last of the Old Media Empires (2013 Public Affairs.)  We'll also meet Marco Werman, the host of PRI's The World and talk with Kentucky author David Bell about his latest mystery novel,

In a special holiday program, the founder of StoryCorps discusses the iconic public radio features 10th anniversary and the recently-released book, Ties That Bind: Stories of Love &  Gratitude from the First Ten Years of StoryCorps (2013, Penguin Press) ; and Grammy Winner and Kentucky native Ricky Skaggs discusses his autobiography, Kentucky Traveler: My Life In Music. (2013 itbooks)

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — The debut of a statewide online health insurance marketplace, which earned a thumbs-up from President Barack Obama for smoothly enrolling tens of thousands of people, has been voted Kentucky's top news story of 2013.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/dafnecholet/5374200948/

The Top 10 Kentucky News Stories of 2013. What do you believe are the top stories of the past year? Send us your list by email to: wekueasternstandard@gmail.com, leave a voice message at 859-622-1657 or post on our Facebook Page.

Guests: Charles Compton, WEKU News Director; Stu Johnson, WEKU reporter; Peter Baniak, editor of the Lexington Herald-Leader

This special edition of our program will feature highlights of previously-aired shows, including: EKU President Michael Benson; The Anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington; Fairness Ordinances in Kentucky; The Bluegrass Pipeline; Domestic Violence; and Effects of the Federal Government Shutdown on Kentucky.  We'll also hear from the man who was for many years, "The Most Heard Voice on Public Radio," Frank Tavares.

What is it like to be Jewish in America?  Better yet, what about in Kentucky? 

Send your questions, comments or personal stories by email before Thursday morning to  wekueasternstandard (at) gmail dot com, post on Facebook, tweet us @889weku or call our Listener Line at 859-622-1657.

Courtesy the JFK Library

Where were you when you first learned about President Kennedy's assassination?  How did you hear about it? Did it effect you?  How do you view Kennedy's presidency half-a-century later? These are some of the questions we're asking in this week's show. 

This week, we'll discuss Prescription Drug Abuse in Kentucky, with an update on efforts to eliminate abuse of prescription medications and limit their availability.  We'll discuss law enforcement efforts, the state's Kentucky All Schedule Prescription Electronic Reporting (KASPER) system and options for treatment and rehab for addicts.

Pages