All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-7pm and Weekends 5-6PM
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Jonese Franklin

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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5:56pm

Fri January 9, 2015
Movie Interviews

'I Was A Dramatic Kid': For Jessica Chastain, Acting Came Naturally

Originally published on Mon January 12, 2015 5:06 pm

Jessica Chastain says her grandmother has played a key role in her career. "I've taken her to the Oscars both years," Chastain says. "She's really a special lady and has helped me in more ways than I could ever explain."
Rafa Rivas AFP/Getty Images

The new movie A Most Violent Year is set in New York City in 1981 — a chaotic time of spiraling crime. The story involves corruption in the heating oil industry: the hijacking of fuel tankers, a businessman trying to stay on the straight and narrow, and a prosecutor who has that businessman in his sights. And finally, there's the story of the businessman's wife ... who may hold all the cards.

Jessica Chastain plays Anna Morales, the upwardly mobile daughter of a Brooklyn gangster. She keeps the books for her husband's fuel business — as well as a number of secrets.

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4:59pm

Fri January 9, 2015
The Two-Way

New York Police Commissioner Confirms Work Slowdown By Officers

Originally published on Mon January 12, 2015 5:06 pm

New York City Police Commissioner Bill Bratton speaks during an NYPD swearing-in ceremony in New York on Jan. 7. He confirmed to NPR today that there had been a work slowdown by officers in the weeks since two police officers were shot dead. He said the matter was being corrected.
Seth Wenig AP

New York City Police Commissioner William Bratton confirmed there had been a work slowdown by officers in the weeks since two police officers were shot dead, but added that the matter was being corrected.

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4:36pm

Fri January 9, 2015
Politics

Congressional Budget Watchdogs Change The Way They Keep Score

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 7:02 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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4:36pm

Fri January 9, 2015
Energy

Future Of Keystone XL Pipeline Back In Obama's Hands

Originally published on Mon January 12, 2015 5:06 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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6:29pm

Thu January 8, 2015
All Tech Considered

Look Out, This Poker-Playing Computer Is Unbeatable

Originally published on Thu January 8, 2015 9:00 pm

Dealer Omar Abu-Eid adjusts a stack of chips before the first day of the World Series of Poker's main event in Las Vegas last July. Humans still reign in most versions of poker. Whew.
John Locher AP

Researchers have developed a computer program they say can beat any human on the planet at a particular variant of Texas Hold'em poker.

The scientists aren't planning to clean up with their powerful poker bot. Instead, they hope it can help computers become better decision-makers in the face of uncertainty. The work is published Thursday in the journal Science.

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6:29pm

Thu January 8, 2015
Europe

France Observes Official Day Of Mourning After Attack

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

6:29pm

Thu January 8, 2015
Fine Art

A Nun Inspired By Warhol: The Forgotten Pop Art Of Sister Corita Kent

Originally published on Fri January 9, 2015 11:21 am

Sister Corita Kent stands in front of her work, including for eleanor, at Immaculate Heart College in 1964.
Courtesy of Corita Art Center

Corita Kent's silkscreens were once compared to Andy Warhol's; her banners and posters were featured at civil rights and anti-war rallies in the 1960s and '70s; she made the covers of Newsweek and The Saturday Evening Post; and she even created a popular postage stamp. Yet today, Kent seems to have fallen through the cracks of art history.

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5:40pm

Thu January 8, 2015
The Salt

On His 80th Birthday, Shake It Like Elvis With A Milkshake

Originally published on Thu January 8, 2015 6:29 pm

A still-trim Elvis Presley enjoys a sandwich in 1958. His love of fatty foods hadn't caught up to him yet.
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Elvis Presley was better known for his music than his gourmet tastes. But he did have a famous affinity for the fried goodness of the American South — and he had the waistline to prove it.

In honor of what would have been the King of Rock 'n' Roll's 80th birthday, let's take a look at some of his legendary eating habits.

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5:40pm

Thu January 8, 2015
Parallels

With A Son Missing, Family Questions Jordan's Mission Against ISIS

Originally published on Fri January 9, 2015 7:13 am

Safi al-Kasasbeh and his wife Saafia are the parents of Moath al-Kasasbeh, the Jordanian air force pilot captured by the self-proclaimed Islamic State in Syria. The worried parents are proud of their son, but say Jordan should not be involved in the coalition against ISIS.
Alice Fordham NPR

In Jordan, the talk these days centers on the fate of the Jordanian pilot who was captured by the self-styled Islamic State after his plane crashed in Syria on Christmas Eve.

Little is known about the condition of Moath al-Kasasbeh since the extremists tweeted pictures of him, bloody and bewildered, after the crash.

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5:40pm

Thu January 8, 2015
Pop Culture

And The Moral Of The Story Is ... Kids Don't Always Understand The Moral

Originally published on Fri January 9, 2015 6:28 pm

In the "Winter's Gift" episode of Sofia the First, Disney Princess Tiana (left) from The Princess and the Frog makes a special appearance to help Princess Sofia learn that a true gift comes from the heart.
Disney Junior

"Slow and steady wins the race."

"What's right for one may be wrong for another."

"Treat others the way you'd like to be treated."

Morals have long been the conclusion of fables and fairy tales aimed at kids. And today's TV shows and movies are no different — they often weave lessons for the younger generation into their narratives. But do children actually absorb these messages, or do these endings just help parents feel better about the media their kids consume?

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4:41pm

Thu January 8, 2015
Europe

Paris Attack Suspect Had Known Terrorism Connections

Originally published on Thu January 8, 2015 6:38 pm

Melissa Block talks to Elaine Sciolino, former Paris bureau chief for the New York Times, about the suspects in Wednesday's attack on the office of a satirical publication. Sciolino covered the apprehension and trial of one of the suspects, Cherif Kouachi, for his role in a France-based terror cell in the mid-2000s.

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4:27pm

Thu January 8, 2015
Author Interviews

In 'Partisan Divide,' Former Congressmen Look For Answers

Originally published on Thu January 8, 2015 6:29 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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4:23pm

Thu January 8, 2015
Europe

'Charlie Hebdo' Attack Punctuates Exisiting Political Tensions

Originally published on Thu January 8, 2015 6:29 pm

Robert Siegel talks to Patrick Weil, professor and senior research fellow at the French National Research Center in the University of Paris 1, Pantheon-Sorbonne, about how the attack on the satirical publication, Charlie Hebdo, relates to ongoing political tensions in France.

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6:17pm

Wed January 7, 2015
Law

Undue Burden In Texas At Issue In Federal Court

Women with the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health demonstrate outside of 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Wednesday in New Orleans. A federal appeals court in New Orleans is considering whether a Texas law puts up an unconstitutional obstacle to women seeking abortions.
Jonathan Bachman AP

Opening arguments began Wednesday in the case against the Texas law requiring abortion clinics to meet the standards of ambulatory surgery centers. Opponents say it would have the effect of closing a significant number of the state's clinics. Melissa Block talks to Carrie Feibel of Houston Public Media.

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6:17pm

Wed January 7, 2015
Remembrances

Remembering 'Generation Mex' Writer And Proud Outsider Michele Serros

Serros, pictured here in February 2014, got her big break as a college student in 1993.
Rachel Buchan AP

When Michele Serros burst onto the literary scene in the 1990s, she was a new kind of Latina writer: She didn't speak much Spanish, she listened to ABBA and she was a vegan who liked to surf and skateboard. Her success as a writer, poet and comedic commentator made her an inspirational voice for Chicanas of her generation and beyond.

Serros, who Newsweek once hailed as a "Woman to Watch for the New Century," died of cancer Sunday at her home in Berkeley, Calif. She was 48 years old.

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6:17pm

Wed January 7, 2015
All Tech Considered

A Plan To Put Your Driver's License On Your Phone

Originally published on Thu January 8, 2015 2:20 pm

A screen shot taken from a video demonstrating how Iowa's digital driver's license would look on a smartphone.
Iowa Department of Transportation

We're doing more and more things with our smartphones, so why not use them to store our driver's license? But when you think about it, you may not be comfortable handing your phone over to a police officer.

Motorists in Iowa may be among the first in the nation to be able to whip out their smartphones to access their licenses at traffic stops. The Iowa Department of Transportation is developing a smartphone app that would allow drivers to access a digitally encoded license that would take the place of the conventional plastic ID card.

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5:19pm

Wed January 7, 2015
Shots - Health News

Brain Scans May Help Predict Future Problems, And Solutions

Originally published on Thu January 8, 2015 5:55 pm

By measuring activity in different parts of the brain, neuroscientsts can get a sense of how some people will respond to treatments.
John Lund Getty Images

Brain scans may soon be able to help predict a person's future — some aspects of it, anyway.

Information from these scans increasingly is able to suggest whether a child will have trouble with math, say, or whether someone with mental illness is going to respond to a particular treatment, according to a review of dozens of studies published Wednesday in the journal Neuron.

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5:16pm

Wed January 7, 2015
All Tech Considered

When It Comes To Smartphones, Are Americans Dumb?

Originally published on Thu January 8, 2015 2:20 pm

Irene Chen and Longlai Zuo, with the China-based company Quality Technology Industrial, show off their top-line phones, which cost about $100.
Aarti Shahani NPR

As you might imagine, there are smartphones everywhere at the International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas this week. Tonino Lamborghini [a company not related to the famous car brand] has a new phone out for $6,000. Samsung's Galaxy series is on display in a dazzling showroom.

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5:11pm

Wed January 7, 2015
Europe

'Charlie Hedbo' A Provocateur, Challenging Status Quo

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 8:57 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

6:19pm

Tue January 6, 2015
Law

Botched Lethal Injection Executions Reignite Death Penalty Debate

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 6:36 pm

Arizona Department of Corrections inmate Joseph Wood was executed by lethal injection in July. It took 15 doses and nearly two hours for him to die.
AP

This past year, the number of inmates executed in America was the lowest in two decades at 35, according to the Death Penalty Information Center.

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5:45pm

Tue January 6, 2015
Politics

Republican Majority Makes Boehner's Job Easier — And Harder

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 6:36 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

5:00pm

Tue January 6, 2015
Research News

Kids May Not Benefit From Extended Isolation After Concussions

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 6:36 pm

New research suggests isolating children with concussions for more than two days may do more harm than good compared to adults. So what's the best approach to treating concussed children? Melissa Block talks with lead researcher Dr. Danny G. Thomas of the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin.

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4:59pm

Tue January 6, 2015
Business

DishTV's New Service Targets Cable Cord Cutters

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 6:36 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

4:54pm

Tue January 6, 2015
Starting Over

An Army Chaplain, First Tested By War, Finds His Faith Renewed

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 8:25 am

As an Army chaplain in Iraq, David Peters administered last rites and grieved with survivors. When he came home, he says, he "fell apart emotionally and spiritually."
Courtesy of Robert K. Chambers

David Peters' life was supposed to be one continuous arc of piety and service.

But for the U.S. Army chaplain, it's ended up a more circuitous route. Peters lost the very faith he was supposed to embody for his soldiers — but has also found his way back.

Peters grew up in a fundamentalist evangelical church in Pennsylvania, served as youth minister and then went to war in Baghdad as a chaplain in the U.S. Army in 2005.

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6:37pm

Mon January 5, 2015
All Tech Considered

U.S. Credit Cards Tackle Fraud With Embedded Chips, But No PINs

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 11:00 am

To protect against fraud, U.S. banks will be issuing credit cards with small computer chips. But some experts say using a PIN to complete a transaction is more secure than a signature.
iStockphoto

This year, there will be an important change in the way Americans use their credit cards. More banks will be issuing cards with small computer chips, a move they say will protect against credit card fraud.

But banks are stopping short of another step that will make credit card usage even safer. And a lot of retailers aren't too happy about it.

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6:03pm

Mon January 5, 2015
All Tech Considered

Prosecutors Say Tools For Hiding Online Hinder Cybercrime Crackdowns

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 1:30 pm

Using Tor, or The Onion Router, enables users to hide their online activities. Advocates say the network protects the privacy of activists. But prosecutors say it's used extensively by criminals — and is making it harder for law enforcement to do its job.
Daniel Acker Bloomberg via Getty Images

Prosecutors say tools that cloak online identities are complicating their efforts to police all kinds of crime.

Take the case of a former head of cybersecurity for the Department of Health and Human Services, Timothy DeFoggi. Prosecutors say they found graphic images of children on a laptop computer in his home.

DeFoggi once led cybersecurity efforts for HHS, but in this case, the Justice Department says, he used his expertise to hide from the law, along with other users of child porn sites, on a network called Tor.

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5:08pm

Mon January 5, 2015
Business

Low Gas Prices Give SUV Sales A Boost, But Automakers Take Long View

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 8:07 am

Dodge Ram pickup trucks await customers Jan. 5 on the lot at Landmark Dodge Chrysler Jeep in Morrow, Ga. Buoyed by a resurgent economy, holiday sales, cheap gasoline and a love affair with pickup trucks, Americans headed to car dealers in droves last month, pushing full-year sales to what's likely to be the highest level since 2006.
John Bazemore AP

Sales of cars surged in December, and analysts believe that the year's total will exceed 17 million, making it the fifth straight year of growth for the industry.

Cheap gas prices helped make that happen, as sales of trucks, SUVs and luxury vehicles rose rapidly. Jeep's sales, for instance, were up 40 percent on increased consumer demand for crossover SUVs. Meanwhile, demand for hybrid and alternative-fuel vehicles shrank.

Scott Painter, founder and CEO of auto sales website TrueCar, says those trends aren't necessarily good for the industry as a whole.

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5:08pm

Mon January 5, 2015
Law

Same-Sex Marriages Start In Florida

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 6:31 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Today, Florida became the 36th state to legalize gay marriage after an extended legal battle in state and federal courts. NPR's Greg Allen was at the courthouse in Miami for today's ruling.

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5:08pm

Mon January 5, 2015
All Tech Considered

Self-Tracking Gadgets That Play Doctor Abound At CES

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 1:30 pm

The San Francisco-based startup CellScope has built a tool to do ear exams at home, instead of going to the doctor.
Cellscope

When your kid's ear is throbbing at 2 a.m., you might want to grab the car keys and head to the emergency room. But now you can pick up your iPhone instead.

A startup called CellScope has built a little ear probe that you clip on top of your iPhone camera. The footage streams into an app where you can view the inside the ear.

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8:54pm

Sun January 4, 2015
Environment

A Shadow Economy Lurks In An Electronics Graveyard

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 3:51 pm

Kwesi Bido, 14, (right) stops to fix 13-year-old Inusa Mohammed's flip flop. Both spend evenings and weekends searching for scrap at Agbogbloshie, an electronic waste dump in Accra, Ghana.
Courtesy of Yepoka Yeebo

The average American produces an estimated 66 pounds of electronic waste every year. You can't compost it; it's gotta go somewhere.

Often, in violation of the law, that means a dump in the developing world — like the region of Agbogbloshie in the West African nation Ghana.

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