All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-7pm and Weekends 5-6PM
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Jonese Franklin

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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4:49pm

Sun May 15, 2011
Around the Nation

In Mississippi Town, Residents Watch Rising Waters

Thousands of homes and farms in Mississippi remain underwater, and residents are bracing for the river's crest later in the week.

Warren County Sheriff Martin Pace checks the depth meter on his small boat motoring through a flooded neighborhood in Vicksburg. The reading: 71/2 feet.

Pace and his deputies patrol this and other inundated parts of town, making sure looters stay out. He points to the top of street signs that stick out of the water: Mary's Alley and Williams Street.

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4:42pm

Sun May 15, 2011
Author Interviews

Bike-Mad Author Finds 'Happiness On Two Wheels'

Before setting off on his quest for two-wheeled perfection, author Robert Penn had already logged 25,000 miles biking around the globe.
Bloomsbury USA

British author Robert Penn has ridden a bicycle almost every day for the past 36 years. He owns six bikes — for summer riding, winter riding, everyday commuting and everything in between. But not one was exactly right. Penn needed the perfect bike.

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8:38am

Sun May 15, 2011
Monkey See

Forget Bridezillas And Frenemies, 'Bridesmaids' Is The Real Deal

Kristen Wiig (left) breaks the tired mold of summer wedding comedies with Bridesmaids, where her character grapples with a rival (Rose Bryne) without the genre's typically inconceivable levels of earnestness.
Suzanne Hanover Universal Pictures

I blame it on My Big Fat Greek Wedding. That winsome little bridal blockbuster hit its stride in May of '02 and played straight through to Labor Day, establishing that 15-year-old boys weren't the only audience who'd go to summer films. Since then, wedding comedies have been a reliable -– and reliably annoying — hot-weather staple, almost always playing predominantly to women, with men attending dutifully as dates, much as they do at weddings themselves.

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3:53pm

Sat May 14, 2011
Author Interviews

'Badass' Guys: Giving History A Kick (And A Punch)

Thompson lists Samson as one of legend's top badasses, citing a story of a crazy, ultrabearded Biblical berserker who killed a thousand warriors using just the jawbone of an ass.
Harper Perennial

Marvel Comics hero Thor smashed his way to the top spot at the box office this past week, but author Ben Thompson says you don't need to go to the multiplex to appreciate the Norse god of thunder.

The original Norse myths provide plenty of excitement on their own, Thompson says. "There's one time, these giants were pissing off the gods, so he disguises himself as a goddess, and goes to some, like, giant feast that they're having," he gushes. "And then, he throws off his costume and just wastes the entire dining hall with a hammer."

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2:15pm

Sat May 14, 2011
Arts & Life

Noise Pollution Hard On Heart As Well As Ears

According to a recent study, noise pollution could be costing lives. A World Health Organization report finds western Europeans lose years to death or disability from excessive sound. Though European countries have taken steps to turn the volume down, the U.S. backed off the effort decades ago.

Across an estimated population of 340 million people, at least one million years of healthy living are lost each year due to noise pollution in Western Europe, WHO researcher Rok Ho Kim says.

A Dangerous Response To Noise

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6:55pm

Fri May 13, 2011
Books

A 16-Year Hunt For New York's 'Mad Bomber'

George Metesky, who confessed to being the "Mad Bomber," looks through the bars of his cell at the Waterbury, Conn., Police Station.
Judd Mehlman New York Daily News via Getty Images

Beginning in 1940, a man named George Metesky hid 33 pipe bombs in public spaces in New York City. Twenty-two of those bombs exploded, injuring 15 people. Until he was captured in 1957, Metesky was known to the press, the police and an increasingly anxious populace as the "Mad Bomber."

Now, 54 years after he was caught, Michael M. Greenburg has written a history of the search for Metesky called The Mad Bomber of New York: The Extraordinary True Story of the Manhunt That Paralyzed a City.

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6:18pm

Fri May 13, 2011
Music Interviews

Italian-Made Western Music, Five Years In The Making

Left to right: Danger Mouse, Daniele Luppi, Norah Jones and Jack White, whose collaborative Western album is titled Rome.
Frank Ockenfels Courtesy of the artist

Super-producer Danger Mouse is perhaps best known for creating the mega-hit "Crazy" as part of the duo Gnarls Barkley.

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3:00pm

Fri May 13, 2011
Education

Colleges Receive Gifts With Strings Attached

A recent gift to Florida State University is once again raising questions about what kinds of strings donors can attach to their gifts. Big donors say they are just trying to ensure that universities expand their research, but many faculty feel that schools strapped for money are agreeing to unacceptable conditions.

3:00pm

Fri May 13, 2011
Commentary

Week In Politics: Budget; 2012 Election

Robert Siegel speaks with political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Brookings Institution, and Republican strategist Ron Christie.

3:00pm

Fri May 13, 2011
Middle East

After Agreement, Palestinians Feel Stirrings Of Hope

The reconciliation agreement between Palestinian rivals Fatah and Hamas is already having an impact in the beleaguered Gaza Strip. After a childhood dominated by misery and war, Yusef Ali is finally daring to hope. The winds of change that came with the Arab spring have swept into the benighted pocket of coastal desert in which he's been trapped for his whole life. Ali's only 27, yet he's spent the last four years living like a pensioner. He's been paid — but he's banned from working, because he's a soldier in the Palestinian Presidential Guard.

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3:00pm

Fri May 13, 2011
World

Haiti's New President To Take Office

Saturday marks a historic day for Haiti. For the first time in the country's history, presidential power is being handed over peacefully. President Rene Preval will be succeeded by Michel Martelly, a retired-musician-turned-politician. Martelly will also be Haiti's first head of state elected since last year's catastrophic earthquake. Robert Siegel talks with Jacqueline Charles, the Miami Herald's Caribbean correspondent.

3:00pm

Fri May 13, 2011
World

George Mitchell Resigns

George Mitchell is resigning as the Obama administration's point man for Mideast peace talks, after failing to sustain direct negotiations between Israel and the Palestinians. The announcement comes just days before the president meets with two Mideast leaders in Washington.

3:00pm

Fri May 13, 2011
Health

Looking At The Facts Of Romney's Health Care Speech

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney is trying to solve his unusual health care problem. His signature on a 2006 Massachusetts law that looks an awful lot like the federal health law most Republicans now want to repeal. Thursday, the likely presidential candidate gave a speech in Michigan that tried to draw distinctions between a law he says he still supports and the federal law he doesn't.

3:00pm

Fri May 13, 2011
Middle East

In Syria, Thousands Protest Regime

Originally published on Fri May 13, 2011 7:01 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

And we begin this hour with news out of Syria. Thousands of protesters across that country took to the streets today for the ninth Friday in a row, this despite one of the most brutal crackdowns against an uprising anywhere in the Arab world. In a moment, we'll hear from a reporter who recently slipped into Syria posing as a tourist and was detained by government security forces there.

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3:00pm

Fri May 13, 2011
NPR Story

Some New Grads Still Struggle To Land Jobs

On college campuses, the outlook for new grads is better than it's been for the past couple of years — with starting salaries averaging about $50,000. Still, for many students — especially those without technical skills or a business background — landing a good job remains tough.

3:00pm

Fri May 13, 2011
NPR Story

FIFA Faces Bribery Accusations

Back in December, international soccer's governing body, FIFA chose Russia and Qatar to host the 2018 and 2022 World Cup tournaments, respectively. And along with FIFA's decisions came allegations of bribery and other misconduct. This week, the accusations against FIFA rose to a new level. Sportswriter Stefan Fatsis talks to Robert Siegel about the latest.

3:00pm

Fri May 13, 2011
NPR Story

In Post-War New York, 'Mad Bomber' Terrorized City

Robert Siegel talks to Michael Greenburg about his book, "The Mad Bomber of New York." It's the story of George Metesky who anonymously left many bombs around the city in the post-war era. Between 1940 and 1957, he placed 33 bombs in busy areas of the city — phone booths, restrooms, movie theaters. The NYPD called the search for the perp "the greatest manhunt in the history of the police department." In the aftermath of the killing of Osama bin Laden, we recall this earlier episode of a man who brought chaos and anger to the Big Apple.

3:00pm

Fri May 13, 2011
National Security

Border Patrol Officers Die In Crash

The Border Patrol says two officers died Thursday after their car was hit by a train. They were in pursuit of smugglers when the accident happened.

3:00pm

Fri May 13, 2011
Around the Nation

Vicksburg Prepares For Flood

Vicksburg, Miss., is the next big city that's expecting floodwaters soon from the Mississippi River. Friday, Gov. Haley Barbour took a helicopter view of the situation.

1:59pm

Fri May 13, 2011
Planet Money

An Internet Rock Star Tells All

Jonathan Coulton's songs almost never get played on the radio. He doesn't have a contract with a music label. Yet he's a one man counterargument to the idea that musicians can't make money making music.

In 2010, Coulton's music brought in about $500,000 in revenue. And since his overhead costs are very low, most of that money went straight to him.

Did he ever expect to make that kind of money as a musician?

"Of course not," he says. "This is absurd."

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1:22pm

Fri May 13, 2011
Music Interviews

Jason Moran Takes Fats Waller Back To The Club

Fats Waller's stride piano style was in demand at rent parties and millionaires' mansions. Somehow, he pulled everyone in and got them to dance.
Evening Standard Hulton Archive

In Depression-era New York jazz clubs, "Fats" Waller was known for getting the party jumping. Now, musicians Jason Moran and Me'Shell Ndegeocello are collaborating on a new project that transforms Waller's rollicking stride piano style into contemporary dance music.

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3:00pm

Thu May 12, 2011
NPR Story

Letters: TBI; Texas Hitchhiker

Robert Siegel reads letters from listeners about a Traumatic Brain Injury piece and a story about a hitchhiker en route to British Columbia

3:00pm

Thu May 12, 2011
NPR Story

Oil CEOs Defend Tax Breaks On Capitol Hill

CEOs from major oil companies were on Capitol Hill Thursday, testifying about the tax advantages their industry enjoys. Some senators and the Obama administration want to remove those tax breaks.

3:00pm

Thu May 12, 2011
Remembrances

Scientist Willard Boyle Dies

Robert Siegel talks with electrical engineering and computer science professor Ruzena Bajcsy about one of the inventors of the C.C.D. — the charged coupling device. Scientist Willard Boyle's creation is found in bar code scanners, digital photography, medical endoscopes and the Hubble Space Telescope. Boyle, who won a Nobel Prize for his invention, recently died at age 86.

3:00pm

Thu May 12, 2011
World

U.S. Autoworker Convicted In Death Camp Case

A German court found retired U.S. autoworker John Demjanjuk guilty of accessory to mass murder Thursday. Demjanjuk, who was born in Ukraine, served as a guard at a Nazi death camp during World War II, but there was no evidence he committed a specific crime. However, the court found that by volunteering to work at the camp, he had participated in mass murder.

3:00pm

Thu May 12, 2011
Books

Review: 'The Druggist Of Aushwitz'

A new novel, The Druggist of Aushwitz by Dieter Schlesak and translated from German by John Hargraves, portrays the Holocaust through the perspective of the victims — and the perpetrators of killing.

3:00pm

Thu May 12, 2011
Politics

Obama, Senate GOP Discuss Debt Ceiling

President Obama met Thursday with Senate Republicans to discuss the nation's debt ceiling and long-term efforts to control the deficit. Meanwhile, a group of Main Street businesses are urging Congress to raise the debt ceiling without delay.

5:29pm

Wed May 11, 2011
Movie Reviews

'Hesher': A Metalhead Mary Poppins, Tattoos And All

He did in fact start the fire: Hesher doesn't give him much of a springboard, but Joseph Gordon-Levitt still draws an intriguing portrait of a sociopathic headbanger who bonds with a grieving middle-schooler.
Merrick Morton Wrekin Hill

When parents talk about someone who'd be a bad influence for their children, they're basically talking about Hesher.

This twentysomething vagrant, played as a anarchic, overgrown wild-child by Joseph Gordon-Levitt, wears his hair long and greasy. He's got a middle-finger tattoo in the small of his back, and he exhibits a pronounced fondness for drugs, pornography and blowing things up.

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3:00pm

Tue May 10, 2011
Politics

Location Of Obama's Immigration Speech Has Meaning

Originally published on Tue May 10, 2011 6:02 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

One more note on the president's speech - not the what, but the where: Chamizal National Memorial commemorates a 1963 treaty between the U.S. and Mexico. The treaty ended a century-long border dispute centered on the Rio Grande.

The river was established as the boundary between the two countries back in 1848, but over time, the big river gradually shifted. It created new property lines and diplomatic disputes.

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3:00pm

Tue May 10, 2011
Politics

Locals React To Obama's Immigration Speech

The U.S. Mexico border has become a militarized zone — with fences, surveillance equipment and thousands of police and military personnel on both sides. In his remarks today, President Obama said his administration has answered critics' concerns about border security. But people who live in the region aren't so sure.

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