All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-7pm and Weekends 5-6PM
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Jonese Franklin

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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3:00pm

Wed May 18, 2011
NPR Story

Early In Campaign, Gingrich Faces Controversy

Newt Gingrich's early days as a presidential candidate are reminding a lot of people of his time as Speaker of the House, angering conservatives with comments about Paul Ryan and then revealing his wife's enormous credit line at Tiffany's.

1:07pm

Wed May 18, 2011
Music News

When The Levee Breaks: Ripples Of The Great Flood

A levee on the Mississippi River in Louisiana during the Great Flood of 1927.
Hulton Archives Getty Images

Along the mighty Mississippi River, rising waters carry musical echoes of the river's long history of floods. Many of those sonic tributaries reach back to perhaps the worst one in U.S. history: The Great Flood of 1927. That catastrophe shaped how future generations of farmers, families and even governments would cope with future floods.

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5:22pm

Tue May 17, 2011
Food

The Man, The Can: Recipes Of The Real Chef Boyardee

Stewart, Tabori & Chang

Unlike the friendly but fictional food faces of Betty Crocker, Aunt Jemima and Uncle Ben, Chef Boyardee — that jovial, mustachioed Italian chef — is real. Ettore "Hector" Boiardi (that's how the family really spells it) founded the company with his brothers in 1928, after the family immigrated to America from Italy.

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5:21pm

Tue May 17, 2011
Music

Scientists And Musicians Compare Notes

Albert Einstein plays violin.
E. O. Hoppe Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

One of the challenges among scientists is describing the work they do in language the rest of us can understand. That's the idea behind a new program at the University of Tennessee that uses music to bridge that communication gap.

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3:21pm

Tue May 17, 2011
Theater

'The Normal Heart,' Still Pumping Love And Fury

Joe Mantello as Larry Kramer's alter-ego Ned Weeks and John Benjamin Hickey as Felix Turner in the revival of The Normal Heart on Broadway.
Joan Marcus

When it premiered in 1985, Larry Kramer's play, The Normal Heart, seemed ripped from the headlines. A thinly-veiled autobiographical work, it dealt with the early days of the AIDS crisis and elicited both admiration and controversy.

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3:00pm

Tue May 17, 2011
Books

Review: Irish Short Story Collections

In the hands of a talented writer, the short story can illuminate the human condition with remarkable economy. It can leave you devastated — or elated — in a matter of minutes.

3:00pm

Tue May 17, 2011
Asia

U.S. Reportedly Accelerates Talks With Taliban

Reports say that the U.S. is pushing harder to establish negotiations with the biggest faction of the Taliban in hopes of moving toward a political resolution to the war in Afghanistan. Michele Norris talks with Karen DeYoung of the Washington Post about the latest talks.

3:00pm

Tue May 17, 2011
Europe

IMF Chief Arrest Leads To Soul Searching In France

France has entered a period of self-examination after the arrest of Dominique Strauss-Kahn. In particular, people are asking if the long tradition of turning a blind eye to the sexual peccadilloes of the French elite has allowed men in powerful positions to abuse women with impunity.

2:38pm

Tue May 17, 2011
Music Reviews

Those Darlins: Making Un-Country Noises

Those Darlins' latest album, Screw Gets Loose, finds the group moving toward harder-rocking material.
Veta&Theo Courtesy of the artist

The three women who front Those Darlins are all surnamed Darlin the way The Ramones were all surnamed Ramone. But the acoustic two-steps on their 2008 debut didn't sound very Ramones. True, "Wild One" talked the talk and "DUI or Die" hit pretty hard for a public-service announcement. But it was a relief when the lead and title track of Those Darlins' Screws Get Loose kicked off with some very un-country noises.

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5:24pm

Mon May 16, 2011
The Two-Way

Cycle Of Protest And Crackdown Continues In Syria

What is going on in Syria is hard to really pin down. Most Western journalists are prohibited from entering the country, but one thing that seems certain, reports NPR's Kelly McEvers from Beirut, is that the cycle of protests then government crackdown continues two months after Syrians began calling for an end to President Bashar Assad's regime.

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5:13pm

Mon May 16, 2011
Planet Money

The History Of The Debt Ceiling

iStockphoto.com

The U.S. government hit the debt ceiling today. This makes life very complicated for the Treasury Department, which now needs to shuffle money around to pay the bills.

But originally, as it turns out, the debt ceiling was supposed to make things easier. A hundred years ago, it seemed so straightforward.

When Congress wanted to spend, it spent. And if it needed to borrow, it approved the sale of a bunch of Treasury bonds. Congress would consider each new bond individually.

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3:58pm

Mon May 16, 2011
Books

Chelsea Handler: Keys To A Multimedia Empire

Lies That Chelsea Handler Told Me, the first book on Handler's new imprint for Grand Central Publishing, was released this month.
Darren Tieste

When Chelsea Handler's last book, Chelsea Chelsea Bang Bang, was released in 2010, the comedian-turned-writer accomplished something very rare. She had three books on the best seller list, all at the same time. Not only that, she beat Karl Rove to the top of the list.

"When we found out that I came in one and he came in two," Handler recalls, "my sister said — she called me and she said — do you think Karl Rove is sitting in his study in his boxer shorts thinking, 'Who the hell is Chelsea Handler?'"

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3:00pm

Mon May 16, 2011
Osama Bin Laden Killed

John Kerry Visits Pakistan With List Of Demands

John Kerry, the chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, is the first American emissary to visit Pakistan since the raid that killed Osama bin Laden. He is known to be a friend of Pakistan, and what he is told by Pakistani army and civilian leaders could be key to American policy going forward. Kerry arrived late Sunday and went quickly to see army chief Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, handing him the list of U.S. demands.

3:00pm

Mon May 16, 2011
Law

Terrorism Cases Move Through U.S. Courts

Hafiz Khan, the imam of the Miami Mosque, also known as Flagler Mosque (pictured), was arrested Saturday along with two of his sons. They, along with three others, were charged with allegedly providing money and support to the Pakistani Taliban. This case, along with another in Chicago linked to the 2008 attacks in Mumbai, India, places U.S.-Pakistani ties under intense scrutiny.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Two terrorism cases now winding their way through the federal court system have links to Pakistan: One involves a Chicago businessman who stands accused of helping plot the 2008 attacks on Mumbai, India. The other case is in Miami, where two local imams and several family members were charged with allegedly providing money and support to the Pakistani Taliban. Both cases come at a time when the U.S. relationship with Pakistan is under intense scrutiny.

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3:00pm

Mon May 16, 2011
Sports

Head Of Phoenix Suns Says He's Gay

Rick Welts, president and CEO of the Phoenix Suns, came out publicly this week. The NBA executive is one of the most high-profile figures still active in sports to declare that he is gay. Robert Siegel talks with Welts about his decision.

3:00pm

Mon May 16, 2011
Space

NASA Shoots Legos, Worms And Squid Into Space

Robert Siegel speaks with Julie Robinson, International Space Station program scientist, about the Legos, roundworms and squid embryos riding along on the Space Shuttle Endeavour's last mission to space. The shuttle program is being discontinued. Monday's launch of Endeavour is the second-to-last space shuttle voyage.

4:49pm

Sun May 15, 2011
Around the Nation

In Mississippi Town, Residents Watch Rising Waters

Thousands of homes and farms in Mississippi remain underwater, and residents are bracing for the river's crest later in the week.

Warren County Sheriff Martin Pace checks the depth meter on his small boat motoring through a flooded neighborhood in Vicksburg. The reading: 71/2 feet.

Pace and his deputies patrol this and other inundated parts of town, making sure looters stay out. He points to the top of street signs that stick out of the water: Mary's Alley and Williams Street.

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4:42pm

Sun May 15, 2011
Author Interviews

Bike-Mad Author Finds 'Happiness On Two Wheels'

Before setting off on his quest for two-wheeled perfection, author Robert Penn had already logged 25,000 miles biking around the globe.
Bloomsbury USA

British author Robert Penn has ridden a bicycle almost every day for the past 36 years. He owns six bikes — for summer riding, winter riding, everyday commuting and everything in between. But not one was exactly right. Penn needed the perfect bike.

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8:38am

Sun May 15, 2011
Monkey See

Forget Bridezillas And Frenemies, 'Bridesmaids' Is The Real Deal

Kristen Wiig (left) breaks the tired mold of summer wedding comedies with Bridesmaids, where her character grapples with a rival (Rose Bryne) without the genre's typically inconceivable levels of earnestness.
Suzanne Hanover Universal Pictures

I blame it on My Big Fat Greek Wedding. That winsome little bridal blockbuster hit its stride in May of '02 and played straight through to Labor Day, establishing that 15-year-old boys weren't the only audience who'd go to summer films. Since then, wedding comedies have been a reliable -– and reliably annoying — hot-weather staple, almost always playing predominantly to women, with men attending dutifully as dates, much as they do at weddings themselves.

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3:53pm

Sat May 14, 2011
Author Interviews

'Badass' Guys: Giving History A Kick (And A Punch)

Thompson lists Samson as one of legend's top badasses, citing a story of a crazy, ultrabearded Biblical berserker who killed a thousand warriors using just the jawbone of an ass.
Harper Perennial

Marvel Comics hero Thor smashed his way to the top spot at the box office this past week, but author Ben Thompson says you don't need to go to the multiplex to appreciate the Norse god of thunder.

The original Norse myths provide plenty of excitement on their own, Thompson says. "There's one time, these giants were pissing off the gods, so he disguises himself as a goddess, and goes to some, like, giant feast that they're having," he gushes. "And then, he throws off his costume and just wastes the entire dining hall with a hammer."

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2:15pm

Sat May 14, 2011
Arts & Life

Noise Pollution Hard On Heart As Well As Ears

According to a recent study, noise pollution could be costing lives. A World Health Organization report finds western Europeans lose years to death or disability from excessive sound. Though European countries have taken steps to turn the volume down, the U.S. backed off the effort decades ago.

Across an estimated population of 340 million people, at least one million years of healthy living are lost each year due to noise pollution in Western Europe, WHO researcher Rok Ho Kim says.

A Dangerous Response To Noise

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6:55pm

Fri May 13, 2011
Books

A 16-Year Hunt For New York's 'Mad Bomber'

George Metesky, who confessed to being the "Mad Bomber," looks through the bars of his cell at the Waterbury, Conn., Police Station.
Judd Mehlman New York Daily News via Getty Images

Beginning in 1940, a man named George Metesky hid 33 pipe bombs in public spaces in New York City. Twenty-two of those bombs exploded, injuring 15 people. Until he was captured in 1957, Metesky was known to the press, the police and an increasingly anxious populace as the "Mad Bomber."

Now, 54 years after he was caught, Michael M. Greenburg has written a history of the search for Metesky called The Mad Bomber of New York: The Extraordinary True Story of the Manhunt That Paralyzed a City.

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6:18pm

Fri May 13, 2011
Music Interviews

Italian-Made Western Music, Five Years In The Making

Left to right: Danger Mouse, Daniele Luppi, Norah Jones and Jack White, whose collaborative Western album is titled Rome.
Frank Ockenfels Courtesy of the artist

Super-producer Danger Mouse is perhaps best known for creating the mega-hit "Crazy" as part of the duo Gnarls Barkley.

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3:00pm

Fri May 13, 2011
Middle East

In Syria, Thousands Protest Regime

Originally published on Fri May 13, 2011 7:01 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

And we begin this hour with news out of Syria. Thousands of protesters across that country took to the streets today for the ninth Friday in a row, this despite one of the most brutal crackdowns against an uprising anywhere in the Arab world. In a moment, we'll hear from a reporter who recently slipped into Syria posing as a tourist and was detained by government security forces there.

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3:00pm

Fri May 13, 2011
NPR Story

Some New Grads Still Struggle To Land Jobs

On college campuses, the outlook for new grads is better than it's been for the past couple of years — with starting salaries averaging about $50,000. Still, for many students — especially those without technical skills or a business background — landing a good job remains tough.

3:00pm

Fri May 13, 2011
NPR Story

FIFA Faces Bribery Accusations

Back in December, international soccer's governing body, FIFA chose Russia and Qatar to host the 2018 and 2022 World Cup tournaments, respectively. And along with FIFA's decisions came allegations of bribery and other misconduct. This week, the accusations against FIFA rose to a new level. Sportswriter Stefan Fatsis talks to Robert Siegel about the latest.

3:00pm

Fri May 13, 2011
NPR Story

In Post-War New York, 'Mad Bomber' Terrorized City

Robert Siegel talks to Michael Greenburg about his book, "The Mad Bomber of New York." It's the story of George Metesky who anonymously left many bombs around the city in the post-war era. Between 1940 and 1957, he placed 33 bombs in busy areas of the city — phone booths, restrooms, movie theaters. The NYPD called the search for the perp "the greatest manhunt in the history of the police department." In the aftermath of the killing of Osama bin Laden, we recall this earlier episode of a man who brought chaos and anger to the Big Apple.

3:00pm

Fri May 13, 2011
National Security

Border Patrol Officers Die In Crash

The Border Patrol says two officers died Thursday after their car was hit by a train. They were in pursuit of smugglers when the accident happened.

3:00pm

Fri May 13, 2011
Around the Nation

Vicksburg Prepares For Flood

Vicksburg, Miss., is the next big city that's expecting floodwaters soon from the Mississippi River. Friday, Gov. Haley Barbour took a helicopter view of the situation.

3:00pm

Fri May 13, 2011
Education

Colleges Receive Gifts With Strings Attached

A recent gift to Florida State University is once again raising questions about what kinds of strings donors can attach to their gifts. Big donors say they are just trying to ensure that universities expand their research, but many faculty feel that schools strapped for money are agreeing to unacceptable conditions.

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