All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-7pm and Weekends 5-6PM
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Jonese Franklin

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

Genre: 

Pages

2:40pm

Mon June 6, 2011
Planet Money

The Failure Tour Of New York

Originally published on Mon May 7, 2012 12:36 pm

Mary Altaffer AP

"I'm sure New York does failure better than anyone else because it does success better than anywhere else," Tim Harford says.

Harford, an economist and author, isn't just being kind. He argues in his new book, "Adapt," that success always starts with failure.

And so we've set out across Manhattan to look for some of those big ideas that didn't work out.

Out first stop is the main library. In the lobby is a classic example of how even things we consider successful were flops at the time: a 15th-century Bible printed by Johannes Gutenberg himself.

Read more

5:14pm

Sun June 5, 2011
Arts & Life

'Rejoice And Shout' Celebrates Gospel Music

Gospel singer Clara Ward, circa 1970s.
Michael Ochs Archives Getty Images

The new documentary Rejoice and Shout, which opens in select theaters this weekend, celebrates the history of gospel music in America as told through some of its most famous and influential icons.

Director Don McGlynn, a veteran of the music documentary genre, wanted to trace gospel from its earliest roots to its current incarnation in the music world. The film even plays the first known recording of gospel music, a record made in 1902 by the Dinwiddie Colored Quartet.

Read more

5:03pm

Sun June 5, 2011
NPR Story

NATO Steps Up Air Attacks In Libya's Capital

The alliance says it is targeting military compounds and forces loyal to Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi, whom they accuse of taking cover among the civilian population. Some of the strikes, which are now being launched from helicopters, are striking targets very near civilian areas.

4:31pm

Sun June 5, 2011
Books

The Sweet Taste Of 'Pop' Culture Nostalgia

Originally published on Thu July 14, 2011 7:35 pm

Scott Eklund Red Box Pictures

Do you have the Eight is Enough theme music burned into your brain? Do you fall into a Proustian reverie at the fizzy punch of Pop Rocks? Are you old enough to remember carrying a metal lunch box to school — and clobbering your friends with it?

Read more

5:02pm

Sat June 4, 2011
Science

Don't Believe Facebook; You Only Have 150 Friends

According to "Dunbar's Number," human beings can maintain a network of only about 150 close friends.
istockphoto.com

GORE-TEX, the company that makes wetsuits, hiking boots and ponchos, is the subject of a famous anecdote in the world of sociology. It centers on the guy who founded the company, Bill Gore.

"When Bill Gore set the company up, he set it up in his backyard," Robin Dunbar, a professor of evolutionary anthropology at the University of Oxford, tells NPR's Rachel Martin.

From its modest beginnings, GORE-TEX grew and grew, Dunbar says, until Gore opened up a large factory. That, too, continued to grow.

Then one day, Dunbar says, Gore walked into his factory.

Read more

3:49pm

Sat June 4, 2011
Books

Drug Smugglers' Party Days A Prelude To War

Barry Foy, one of South Carolina's "gentlemen smugglers," was a target in "Operation Jackpot," a Reagan-era drug sting that convicted over 100 smugglers.
Courtesy of Barry Foy

Forty years ago this month, President Richard Nixon officially introduced something he called the "War on Drugs." A decade later, Ronald Reagan launched it as a national crusade, with the memorable slogan "Just Say No."

Since then, though, the Obama administration has jettisoned the term "war on drugs," and this past week, the Global Commission on Drug Policy issued a report calling the crusade a failure.

Read more

3:37pm

Fri June 3, 2011
Music Interviews

Moby: On The Long, Lonesome Road

A self-portrait from Moby's new photo book Destroyed, released alongside a moody album of the same name.
Moby Courtesy of the artist

In the early '90s, Moby was a popular DJ in the U.K. club scene. He played techno, house and electronica — all genres that weren't really big in the U.S. at the time.

Read more

3:13pm

Fri June 3, 2011
Music News

Texas Gets The Accordion Bug And Never Looks Back

Originally published on Fri June 3, 2011 9:00 pm

Flaco Jimenez is one of the foremost players of conjunto, a Tejano musical style that developed after German and Czech immigrants brought the accordion to Texas.
John Dyer

It's a well-known story — the one where European conquerors ravaged the New World with disease in the 15th century. That story repeated itself, in a very different way, in the early part of the 20th century in Texas.

Only it wasn't illness that German and Czech settlers were spreading to unsuspecting Hispanics, Creoles and Cajuns. This time, it was a musical instrument from which they would not recover.

Read more

3:00pm

Fri June 3, 2011
Politics

House Approves Resolution Chiding Obama On Libya

The House voted Friday on two resolutions addressing concern that President Obama has not sought congressional approval for military operations in Libya. One sponsored by Speaker John Boehner says the president has not given Congress a compelling rationale for the operations. It was adopted. The other was not adopted: It was offered by Democrat Dennis Kucinich and would give the president 15 days to remove forces from Libya.

3:00pm

Fri June 3, 2011
Politics

Blagojevich Faces Tough Questions From Prosecution

Transcript

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Michele Norris.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

This time is different. After several years and one hung jury, former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich has taken the stand for the first time. He began testifying last week in his retrial on 20 federal corruption charges. Blagojevich talked about everything from politics to love. And then, late yesterday, the fireworks began when prosecutors were finally able to cross-examine him.

Read more

3:00pm

Fri June 3, 2011
NPR Story

Is The Auto Industry Out Of The Woods?

On a day when a new jobs report showed hiring across the U.S. has slowed significantly, the White House went on the offensive. President Obama was in Ohio Friday defending his economic policies and asserting that his administration's bailout of Chrysler and General Motors saved thousands of jobs that otherwise would have disappeared. The president visited a Chrysler Plant in Toledo, where he announced the government sale of its final 6-percent stake in Chrysler to the Italian auto company, Fiat.

Read more

3:00pm

Fri June 3, 2011
NPR Story

Week In Sports: Ohio State; NBA Finals; Spelling Bee

Robert Siegel talks to sportswriter Stefan Fatsis about the week in sports. A large college football program is under the microscope, Dallas makes a late comeback in the NBA finals, and a champion is crowned in the Scripps National Spelling Bee.

3:00pm

Fri June 3, 2011
NPR Story

Yemen's President Injured From Attack

Embattled Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh was injured Friday after his presidential palace was attacked by tribal fighters armed with rockets. It's a major escalation of the violence in Yemen. The peaceful protests calling for the president's ouster may now be giving way to an all-out battle for power between Yemeni tribes. Michele Norris talks with Hakim Almasmari the editor in chief for the Yemen Post about the attacks — and the latest on the unrest in the Yemeni capital of Sanaa.

3:00pm

Fri June 3, 2011
NPR Story

In Syria, Protesters Mark 'Children's Friday'

Protesters brave the streets of Syrian cities amid an ongoing government crackdown that has left more than 1,000 dead in the past two months. Friday's demonstrations are dedicated to the children who've been killed since the uprising began. NPR's Deborah Amos talks to Robert Siegel.

3:00pm

Fri June 3, 2011
NPR Story

Jobs Numbers May Point To Faltering Recovery

The Labor Department reported Friday that the economy added only 54,000 jobs in May. That was far less than most economists had been expecting, and the new data suggest the economic recovery may be faltering. The unemployment rate rose to 9.1 percent from 9 percent in April.

3:00pm

Fri June 3, 2011
Commentary

Week In Politics: GOP Presidential Field

Robert Siegel speaks with our regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Brookings Institution, and David Brooks of The New York Times.

3:00pm

Fri June 3, 2011
Health

Young People Talk About AIDS

Teens and 20-somethings have grown up knowing about HIV/AIDS. Thirty years after AIDS was first diagnosed, young adults discuss their feelings and attitudes toward the syndrome.

3:00pm

Fri June 3, 2011
Health

Doctor Spends Career Waging War On AIDS

Thirty years ago, doctors put a name to a disease ravaging the gay community. Michele Norris talks with Dr. Michael Saag, director of the University of Alabama-Birmingham Center for AIDS Research, about the evolution in understanding of and living with AIDS.

3:00pm

Fri June 3, 2011
Sports

Shaquille O'Neal Retires

Robert Siegel and Michele Norris report that NBA star Shaquille O'Neal announced he will retire from basketball.

3:00pm

Thu June 2, 2011
NPR Story

Geithner Meets With GOP Freshmen

Tuesday's show vote in the House against raising the debt ceiling may not have been what rattled Wall Street, and the financial markets are somewhat accustomed to partisan shenanigans on Capitol Hill. The question now is whether the infusion of GOP freshmen, who so strongly oppose spending, will take this year's showdown beyond the brink. Thursday, Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner talks to the freshmen. NPR's Andrea Seabrook talks to Michele Norris.

3:00pm

Thu June 2, 2011
NPR Story

Mentally Ill Juvenile Offenders Receive More Attention

Slowly, states and local governments are moving to treat the mental health needs of juvenile offenders. In Los Angeles County, new programs are helping treat the vast number of troubled youth who suffer from depression, post-traumatic stress disorder or other maladies.

3:00pm

Thu June 2, 2011
NPR Story

Study: Iowa, N.H. Have More Impact On Campaigns

Two economics professors who set out to measure the influence of early primaries and caucuses on the electoral process found that states like Iowa and New Hampshire may have a disproportionate influence on who gets elected. They write that the "overweighting of early voters ... represents a deviation from the democratic ideal of 'one person, one vote.'" Michele Norris talks with Brian Knight, associate professor of economics at Brown University, about his paper, co-written with Nathan Schiff. It's called "Momentum and Learning in Presidential Primaries."

3:00pm

Thu June 2, 2011
NPR Story

EEG Could Help ID Infants With Autism

Scientists say electroencephalography or EEG could help identify infants who are likely to develop autism. The technology detects unusual electrical patterns in the brain that are associated with autism.

3:00pm

Thu June 2, 2011
NPR Story

Summer Sounds: Little League

Steve Proffitt is sure it's summer when he hears the sound of a Little League game. This was underlined not long ago when he took a ball to the chin when his son was playing.

3:00pm

Thu June 2, 2011
Science

Rare Form Of E. Coli To Blame For Outbreak

The E. coli story is boiling up, with the CDC saying the outbreak is being caused by a rare strain of the bacteria. The Russians have seized on it as an opportunity for some nationalist chest-thumping, imposing a complete ban on European Union raw vegetables The Germans admit they have no idea of the source. At least 18 people are dead.

3:00pm

Thu June 2, 2011
NPR Story

Stock Markets Sputter Over Concerns Over Economy

The economic recovery is now two years old, but it is not impressing anyone. Growth has slowed and jobs are still scarce. Data released this week suggest the economy is losing momentum.

5:58pm

Wed June 1, 2011
Movie Interviews

Filmmaker Shoots At The Heart Of The Tornado

A tornado touches down in Sean Casey's IMAX film, Tornado Alley.
Courtesy of Giant Screen Films

This spring, tornadoes have been wreaking havoc across the Midwest. Most people prudently seek shelter when they hear a storm is coming, but one man and his team have made it their job to get as close as they can — and warn others that a twister is on the way.

His name is Sean Casey and he's a professional storm chaser whose new IMAX film, Tornado Alley, records his mission to capture the heart of a tornado on film.

Meet The TIV-2

Read more

5:39pm

Wed June 1, 2011
You Must Read This

Through A Correspondent's Eyes: Revisiting Vietnam

At the small southern college where I taught in the 1970s, one of the grad students had flown a chopper in Vietnam. Instead of living on campus, he rented a cottage in the woods. He slept there alone, with a Colt .45 under his pillow.

He played me tapes of fire-fights in which friends had died. Out of the jabber and roar of bad recording, he teased monologues that were poisoned with the essence of terror and despair.

Read more

3:07pm

Wed June 1, 2011
Music Reviews

My Morning Jacket: Home Again

My Morning Jacket's new album is titled Circuital.
Danny Clinch Courtesy of the artist

There's a song on My Morning Jacket's sixth studio album, Circuital, that will probably make aging rockers smile. It's called "Outta My System," and in it, songwriter Jim James sings with great Buddha warmth about aging out of the Friday-night indulgences of youth.

Read more

12:28pm

Wed June 1, 2011
Monkey See

The Grand Rapids Lip Dub: A Giant Street Party Set To Music

A screencap from the Grand Rapids Lip Dub.
Youtube screen capture

If you were online over the Memorial Day weekend, you may well have seen The Grand Rapids Lip Dub.

Read more

Pages