All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-7pm and Weekends 5-6PM
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Jonese Franklin

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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4:17pm

Fri June 10, 2011
Music Interviews

From 'Shenandoah' To Afghanistan: George Crumb's 'Winds Of Destiny'

A US Navy sailor waiting to be sent out on a mission in Afghanistan in November 2010.
Paula Bronstein Getty Images

Though the Civil War is a century and a half behind us, our country's involvement in conflict is not. Director Peter Sellars has taken a work by Pulitzer Prize-winning composer George Crumb, based on folk songs of the Civil War, and updated it to the present day.

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3:00pm

Fri June 10, 2011
Commentary

Week In Politics: Weiner; GOP Presidential Field

Melissa Block speaks with our regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Brookings Institution, and David Brooks of The New York Times.

3:00pm

Fri June 10, 2011
National Security

Justice Department Agrees To Plea In Drake Case

The Justice Department has agreed to a plea deal with Thomas Drake, a former National Security Agency employee originally charged with 10 felonies, including violating the Espionage Act. Jane Mayer, staff writer for The New Yorker, joins Melissa Block to talk about how Thomas Drake became accused of being an enemy of the state.

3:00pm

Fri June 10, 2011
Around the Nation

Alaska Releases Palin Emails

Thousands of Sarah Palin's emails from her time as the governor of Alaska were released Friday in Juneau, Alaska. The several foot-high stacks of paper were distributed to reporters on hand trucks.

3:00pm

Fri June 10, 2011
Science

Power May Increase Promiscuity

Anthony Weiner, John Edwards, Arnold Schwarzenegger — men behaving badly, right? It may be more complex than that. Research shows power causes men and women to take risks and imagine themselves as more attractive. New survey research shows that, given power, women are as likely as men to stray.

3:00pm

Fri June 10, 2011
Sports

NBA Faces Contentious Lockout

The NBA is on the verge of a possibly very long, contentious lockout. Melissa Block talks to CNBC sports business reporter Darren Rovell for more.

3:00pm

Fri June 10, 2011
National Security

Gates Rebukes NATO Members On Libya Mission

Defense Secretary Robert Gates, who leaves office at the end of the month, sharply criticized NATO Friday. He noted that all members of the alliance voted for the Libya mission, but less than half have participated. Just 11 weeks into the mission, the "mightiest military alliance in history" is beginning to run short of munitions, requiring the U.S. once more to make up the difference. The U.S. is "in the midst of a deep economic crisis of our own," he said.

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3:00pm

Fri June 10, 2011
Around the Nation

Nikki Haley Feuds With S.C. Legislature

South Carolina's Supreme Court has settled a standoff between Republican Gov. Nikki Haley and the state Legislature. The Legislature won, but the battle seems to be only heating up. Just as the Legislature was wrapping up its regular session earlier this month, Haley ordered the Legislature to return to session. In return, the Senate president pro tempore filed a lawsuit with the state Supreme Court, saying Haley's order violated the separation of powers. The court sided with the Legislature.

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9:38pm

Thu June 9, 2011
Around the Nation

Once A Critic, VA Blogger Seeks To 'Fix' Problems

Alex Horton sits against a wall in Baqubah, Iraq, shortly after a firefight.
Courtesy of Alex Horton

When Alex Horton shipped home from Iraq in 2007, he decided to go to college and get a degree in journalism. He hoped the new, post-Sept. 11 GI Bill would help him out.

"With my bank account dwindling and rent, utility bills, school tuition and other obligations on the table, coupled with the advice of my VA counselor, I bet it all on the post-9/11 GI Bill. And I lost," Horton wrote at the time on his blog, Army of Dude.

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7:33pm

Thu June 9, 2011
Around the Nation

Chicago Man Guilty On 2 Of 3 Terror-Related Charges

A federal terrorism case in Chicago has ended with a split verdict. Jurors found Chicago businessman Tahawwur Rana guilty on two of three counts of providing material support for terrorism. Rana was charged with helping plan the 2008 terrorist attack in Mumbai, India, that left about 170 people dead. He was also accused of helping plot an attack against a Danish newspaper that had published cartoons of the Muslim Prophet Muhammad.

3:00pm

Thu June 9, 2011
NPR Story

Panetta's Confirmation Hearing Gets Choppy

Originally published on Thu June 9, 2011 10:11 pm

Transcript

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

From NPR News, this is All Things Considered, I'm Michele Norris.

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

And I'm Melissa Block.

We go first this hour to Capitol Hill, where CIA Director Leon Panetta appeared at a confirmation hearing for his next likely post, Secretary of Defense. Panetta is expected to sail smoothly through the confirmation process to succeed Robert Gates.

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5:18pm

Wed June 8, 2011
Monkey See

Summer Television: A Time Of 'Men,' Werewolves And Aliens

Andre Braugher, LisaGay Hamilton, Ray Romano and Scott Bakula star on TNT's Men Of A Certain Age.
Danny Feld TNT

Feel like you're drowning in a flood of so-called "reality" television, Canadian series imports and new cable shows?

It's not you, it's TV; specifically, the oddball land of summer television.

As the big networks try to avoid looking like they've gone fishin' for summer and cable amps up its schedule, there's a new universe of programming for small screen fans to sort though. And there's a few standout series worth seeing — and avoiding — in the weeks to come.

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3:45pm

Wed June 8, 2011
The Record

For 2011, The Summer Concert Season Gets A Reboot

Wayne Coyne on stage performing with The Flaming Lips at Sasquatch Music Festival Memorial Day weekend.
Alex Crick for KEXP

Last summer the concert industry, which had grown steadily for a decade, slipped badly. It was a surprise to almost everyone who pays attention to the hugely complicated network of bands, big and small, that tour the country, but looking back, it seems like maybe it was just a matter of time.

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3:37pm

Wed June 8, 2011
All Songs Considered Blog

5 Songs For Sharks That Like AC/DC

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 4:03 pm

According to a charter boat operator in South Australia, sharks really like AC/DC. This makes perfect sense.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

The Australian rock band AC/DC may have a new fan base - or should we say fin base.

(Soundbite of song, "Back in Black")

BLOCK: Matt Waller, a charter boat operator in south Australia's Port Lincoln, has found that great white sharks are attracted to the heavy metal group's music when it's played under water. But, he says, it appears to make them less aggressive. Some sharks even rub their snouts against the caged speakers.

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3:15pm

Wed June 8, 2011
The Picture Show

The Secret World Of Child Brides

Long after midnight, 5-year-old Rajani is roused from sleep and carried by her uncle to her wedding. Child marriage is illegal in India, so ceremonies are often held in the wee hours of morning. It becomes a secret the whole village keeps, explained one farmer.
Stephanie Sinclair National Geographic

Today on All Things Considered, Michele Norris talks with National Geographic Magazine reporter Cynthia Gorney and photographer Stephanie Sinclair about their June piece, "Too Young to Wed: The Secret World of Child Brides." I also caught up with Sinclair — a photojournalist specializing in gender and human-rights issues — to ask her a few questions about the project she has been working on for eight years.

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4:05pm

Tue June 7, 2011
Spotlight on Country

Matraca Berg: 'Dreaming' Out Loud

Matraca Berg.
Glen Rose Courtesy of the artist

Singer-songwriter Matraca Berg co-wrote her first hit song with Bobby Braddock at age 18. She's a two-time Grammy nominee and a member of the Songwriters Hall of Fame in Nashville, where she was born, raised and still lives.

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4:00pm

Tue June 7, 2011
The Record

A Record Label Resurrects The Radio Star

Alex Turner and Matt Helders of Arctic Monkeys at the Domino Radio studio on Monday.
Courtesy of Domino Records

You'd think that a country that gave birth to The Beatles and The Rolling Stones would have radio stations belting out plenty of new music. But in Britain, critics complain about a surprising lack of variety and an absence of risk taking among many broadcasters. The BBC gives some exposure to new bands.

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4:18pm

Mon June 6, 2011
Youth Radio

Unschooled: How One Kid Is Grateful He Stayed Home

Sam Fuller of Albany is part of a rare minority of homeschoolers who call themselves "unschooled" — a more unstructured self-directed form of homeschooling.
Courtesy of Sam Fuller

With summer on the horizon, many teens are looking forward to a break from school and tests. But for Sam Fuller of Albany, not much is going to change. Fuller is part of a rare minority of homeschoolers who call themselves "unschooled" — a more unstructured self-directed form of homeschooling. There are about 2 million registered homeschoolers in the U.S., a number that grows by about 10 percent a year. Sam's family can keep Sam and his brother home by registering their house as a private school.

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3:47pm

Mon June 6, 2011
The Record

Apple Announces iCloud Streaming Music Service

Apple CEO Steve Jobs delivers the keynote address at the 2011 Apple World Wide Developers Conference in San Francisco.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

You can hear Laura Sydell, NPR's Digital Culture Reporter, talk to All Things Considered's Melissa Block about the announcement by clicking on the audio link above.

On Monday afternoon, Apple announced the introduction of iCloud, a music service that will allow users to listen to their music from almost any Internet-connected device. (Update: Initially we called Apple's service a streaming one. We're not sure exactly how iTunes Match will work, and we're getting in touch with Apple. We'll update again as soon as we hear back.)

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2:40pm

Mon June 6, 2011
Planet Money

The Failure Tour Of New York

Originally published on Mon May 7, 2012 12:36 pm

Mary Altaffer AP

"I'm sure New York does failure better than anyone else because it does success better than anywhere else," Tim Harford says.

Harford, an economist and author, isn't just being kind. He argues in his new book, "Adapt," that success always starts with failure.

And so we've set out across Manhattan to look for some of those big ideas that didn't work out.

Out first stop is the main library. In the lobby is a classic example of how even things we consider successful were flops at the time: a 15th-century Bible printed by Johannes Gutenberg himself.

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5:14pm

Sun June 5, 2011
Arts & Life

'Rejoice And Shout' Celebrates Gospel Music

Gospel singer Clara Ward, circa 1970s.
Michael Ochs Archives Getty Images

The new documentary Rejoice and Shout, which opens in select theaters this weekend, celebrates the history of gospel music in America as told through some of its most famous and influential icons.

Director Don McGlynn, a veteran of the music documentary genre, wanted to trace gospel from its earliest roots to its current incarnation in the music world. The film even plays the first known recording of gospel music, a record made in 1902 by the Dinwiddie Colored Quartet.

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5:03pm

Sun June 5, 2011
NPR Story

NATO Steps Up Air Attacks In Libya's Capital

The alliance says it is targeting military compounds and forces loyal to Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi, whom they accuse of taking cover among the civilian population. Some of the strikes, which are now being launched from helicopters, are striking targets very near civilian areas.

4:31pm

Sun June 5, 2011
Books

The Sweet Taste Of 'Pop' Culture Nostalgia

Originally published on Thu July 14, 2011 7:35 pm

Scott Eklund Red Box Pictures

Do you have the Eight is Enough theme music burned into your brain? Do you fall into a Proustian reverie at the fizzy punch of Pop Rocks? Are you old enough to remember carrying a metal lunch box to school — and clobbering your friends with it?

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5:02pm

Sat June 4, 2011
Science

Don't Believe Facebook; You Only Have 150 Friends

According to "Dunbar's Number," human beings can maintain a network of only about 150 close friends.
istockphoto.com

GORE-TEX, the company that makes wetsuits, hiking boots and ponchos, is the subject of a famous anecdote in the world of sociology. It centers on the guy who founded the company, Bill Gore.

"When Bill Gore set the company up, he set it up in his backyard," Robin Dunbar, a professor of evolutionary anthropology at the University of Oxford, tells NPR's Rachel Martin.

From its modest beginnings, GORE-TEX grew and grew, Dunbar says, until Gore opened up a large factory. That, too, continued to grow.

Then one day, Dunbar says, Gore walked into his factory.

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3:49pm

Sat June 4, 2011
Books

Drug Smugglers' Party Days A Prelude To War

Barry Foy, one of South Carolina's "gentlemen smugglers," was a target in "Operation Jackpot," a Reagan-era drug sting that convicted over 100 smugglers.
Courtesy of Barry Foy

Forty years ago this month, President Richard Nixon officially introduced something he called the "War on Drugs." A decade later, Ronald Reagan launched it as a national crusade, with the memorable slogan "Just Say No."

Since then, though, the Obama administration has jettisoned the term "war on drugs," and this past week, the Global Commission on Drug Policy issued a report calling the crusade a failure.

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3:37pm

Fri June 3, 2011
Music Interviews

Moby: On The Long, Lonesome Road

A self-portrait from Moby's new photo book Destroyed, released alongside a moody album of the same name.
Moby Courtesy of the artist

In the early '90s, Moby was a popular DJ in the U.K. club scene. He played techno, house and electronica — all genres that weren't really big in the U.S. at the time.

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3:13pm

Fri June 3, 2011
Music News

Texas Gets The Accordion Bug And Never Looks Back

Originally published on Fri June 3, 2011 9:00 pm

Flaco Jimenez is one of the foremost players of conjunto, a Tejano musical style that developed after German and Czech immigrants brought the accordion to Texas.
John Dyer

It's a well-known story — the one where European conquerors ravaged the New World with disease in the 15th century. That story repeated itself, in a very different way, in the early part of the 20th century in Texas.

Only it wasn't illness that German and Czech settlers were spreading to unsuspecting Hispanics, Creoles and Cajuns. This time, it was a musical instrument from which they would not recover.

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3:00pm

Fri June 3, 2011
Politics

House Approves Resolution Chiding Obama On Libya

The House voted Friday on two resolutions addressing concern that President Obama has not sought congressional approval for military operations in Libya. One sponsored by Speaker John Boehner says the president has not given Congress a compelling rationale for the operations. It was adopted. The other was not adopted: It was offered by Democrat Dennis Kucinich and would give the president 15 days to remove forces from Libya.

3:00pm

Fri June 3, 2011
Politics

Blagojevich Faces Tough Questions From Prosecution

Transcript

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Michele Norris.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

This time is different. After several years and one hung jury, former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich has taken the stand for the first time. He began testifying last week in his retrial on 20 federal corruption charges. Blagojevich talked about everything from politics to love. And then, late yesterday, the fireworks began when prosecutors were finally able to cross-examine him.

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3:00pm

Fri June 3, 2011
NPR Story

Is The Auto Industry Out Of The Woods?

On a day when a new jobs report showed hiring across the U.S. has slowed significantly, the White House went on the offensive. President Obama was in Ohio Friday defending his economic policies and asserting that his administration's bailout of Chrysler and General Motors saved thousands of jobs that otherwise would have disappeared. The president visited a Chrysler Plant in Toledo, where he announced the government sale of its final 6-percent stake in Chrysler to the Italian auto company, Fiat.

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