All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-7pm and Weekends 5-6PM
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Jonese Franklin

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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3:00pm

Thu June 16, 2011
Around the Nation

Brown Vetos Calif. Budget

California Gov. Gerry Brown has vetoed the budget sent to him Wednesday by the Legislature. Lawmakers had scrambled to meet their deadline. But Brown says the budget fails to raise taxes and makes severe cuts to vital public services. Robert Siegel talks with Sacramento bureau chief of member station KQED John Myers.

3:00pm

Thu June 16, 2011
Politics

Politicos Face Off On The Green

President Obama and Republican Speaker of the House John Boehner will put their differences aside — at least for a round of golf this weekend. They'll be joined by Vice President Joe Biden and Ohio Republican Governor John Kasich. Robert Siegel talks with Peter Finch, an editor at Golf Digest magazine, about how relationships can grow and deals can be made on the green.

3:00pm

Thu June 16, 2011
Europe

Greece's Papandreou Fends Off Revolt

Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou says he will stay on as leader of his party and the country. Papandreou has been criticized for his handling of the debt crisis in Greece, and there has been growing opposition to the austerity measures he says are vital if Greece is to keep receiving bailout money from the EU and IMF. Sylvia Poggioli speaks with Melissa Block.

5:23pm

Wed June 15, 2011
History

Places In Peril: 2011's Most Endangered Historic Sites

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:45 am

Isaac Manchester Farm in Avella, Pa.
National Trust for Historic Preservation

On Wednesday, the National Trust for Historic Preservation released its latest list of places the trust considers the most endangered in the country. The list of 11 includes a Chicago hospital; a jazz musician's home; and a plant in Minneapolis that was once the world's most advanced flour mill.

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4:55pm

Wed June 15, 2011
Law

Planned Texas Execution Has Mexico Up In Arms

Humberto Leal Jr., a Mexican citizen, has been on death row since 1995 for the rape and bludgeoning of a 16-year-old San Antonio girl. He's slated to be executed in three weeks. But the Mexican government says he wasn't informed of his rights.
Courtsey of San Antonio Express-News

A planned execution in Texas has the state at odds with the federal government and the International Court of Justice.

The dispute involves Humberto Leal Jr., a Mexican national who was convicted of murder and sentenced to death.

When he was arrested, Leal was not informed of his right to notify his embassy or consulate. Mexico cried foul, the International Court of Justice agreed, and the U.S. government asked Texas to review the case.

But the state has refused and plans to execute Leal in three weeks.

The Case

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7:12pm

Tue June 14, 2011
Around the Nation

Wis. Supreme Court Upholds State's Union Law

Wisconsin Public Radio's Shawn Johnson tells Melissa Block about the Wisconsin Supreme Court's decision allowing a controversial law — which curbs public employee union bargaining rights — to go into effect.

4:50pm

Tue June 14, 2011
Youth Radio

This Is Your Brain On Ads: An Internal 'Battle'

Maya wears the EEG cap and watches the commercial at the headquarters on NeuroFocus in Berkeley, Calif.
Courtesy of Youth Radio

For decades, social scientists have tried to determine how TV advertising affects the children and teenagers who watch them. Do commercials make kids more materialistic? Are fast food ads responsible for childhood obesity rates?

So I wanted to find out what's going on in the brain when kids watch a TV ad.

I am at Walgreens in the hair product aisle. There are a lot of brand-name shampoos on the shelf, but there's one that always catches my eye — Tresemme.

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4:10pm

Tue June 14, 2011
The Record

Bad Vibrations: Investigating Sound As Terror

Steve Goodman, also known as Kode9, at left, with frequent collaborator The Spaceape.
Courtesy of Hyperdub

I first heard of Steve Goodman as the head of the Hyperdub, a London-based record label that has released work by avant-garde electronic artists like Burial, Joker, and The Bug. But Goodman isn't your average label executive. He's a scholar, a lecturer at the University of East London, and a musician who goes by the name Kode9. His new album, Black Sun, features rumbling bass lines under lyrics about a toxic world where a radioactive event has laid the land to waste.

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4:03pm

Tue June 14, 2011
Remembrances

'Hell Of A Leader': Marines Remember Sgt. Garrison

Sgt. Joseph Garrison with Fox Company, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, runs through the desert near Camp Leatherneck during a drill in June 2009. Garrison was killed while on his fourth combat deployment to Afghanistan in June 2011, when he was struck by a homemade bomb in Marja.
David Gilkey NPR

On Friday, Marines will gather to remember Sgt. Joseph Garrison at a small combat outpost in Afghanistan's Helmand province.

Garrison, 27, was killed earlier this month by a roadside bomb.

NPR talked with Garrison on an earlier deployment, when he was busy training Marines for an operation against Taliban forces in the Helmand River valley.

"We're brothers. We eat together, train together, sleep together," Garrison said two years ago. "And we'll die for each other."

'Hell Of A Leader'

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4:01pm

Tue June 14, 2011
Three Books...

For Fathers And Sons, A Complex But Important Bond

iStockphoto.com

In the eleven years since my father died, I've read just about anything I could get my hands on about fathers and sons. Surveying the range of others' relationships with their fathers has steadied me while I tried to make sense of mine. Envy for what I didn't have is balanced by gratitude for what I did.


Final Rounds: A Father, A Son, The Golf Journey Of A Lifetime

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10:50am

Tue June 14, 2011
Monkey See

DVD Picks: 'The Bridge on the River Kwai'

It's time for movie critic Bob Mondello's latest home-viewing recommendation, for those who want to pop in a video and pop their own popcorn. This week, Bob's suggesting a new Blu-Ray collector's edition of The Bridge on the River Kwai.

British prisoners of war marching into a Japanese labor camp, whistling "The Colonel Bogey March" as a way of thumbing their noses at their captors, then building one magnificent railroad bridge — the best that British military engineering (and director David Lean's production crew) could manage.

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4:12pm

Sat June 11, 2011
Music Interviews

The Go-Go's: Still Going

The Go-Go's are on tour to celebrate the 30th anniversary of their massively successful debut.
Courtesy of the artist

In the summer of 1981, The Go-Go's released Beauty and the Beat, a record that would become the first No. 1 album for an all-female band that wrote its own songs and played its own instruments. And believe it or not, that hasn't happened again since.

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3:00pm

Sat June 11, 2011
NPR Story

Week In News: Weiner Scandal

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi joined a growing chorus of top Democrats on Saturday calling for the resignation of Democratic Rep. Anthony Weiner, who is at the center of a sexting scandal. Host Rachel Martin speaks with James Fallows, national correspondent for The Atlantic, about this story and others from the past week.

3:00pm

Sat June 11, 2011
NPR Story

Karzai Urges Pakistan To Reconcile With Taliban

Afghan President Hamid Karzai is visiting neighboring Pakistan to ask that nation's prime minister, Yousuf Raza Gilani, to support peace talks with the Taliban and eliminate militant strongholds on the border.

2:39pm

Sat June 11, 2011
Author Interviews

Psychiatrist Bears Witness To A Century Of Atrocities

In 1962, Robert Jay Lifton and his wife, BJ, arrived in Hiroshima where Lifton studied the human consequences of nuclear weapons through conversations with survivors of 1945's atomic bomb.
Courtesy of Free Press

Robert Jay Lifton wasn't sure what he wanted to do with his life when he left the Army in 1954 after serving in the Korean War. He was living with his wife in Hong Kong and was about to return to the U.S. to pursue a predictable career. Instead, the psychiatrist made a last-minute decision to stay in Hong Kong — and it changed everything.

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6:42pm

Fri June 10, 2011
Music Interviews

Ben Allison: Personal And Unpredictable

Ben Allison says that putting a personal spin on the songs he loves often requires breaking them apart.
Lourdes Delgado

Jazz bassist Ben Allison has made a name for himself with his original compositions, but on his 10th album, Action-Refraction, he reinterprets the works of other musicians. The selections vary widely: from the R&B of Donny Hathaway to the unconventional rock of PJ Harvey. Though Allison says he was attracted to "tuneful, well-crafted songs," his covers are by no means ordinary.

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4:59pm

Fri June 10, 2011
Author Interviews

Blood, Bones and Organs: The Gruesome 'Red Market'

Locals say this building in Kolkata, India was once the center of the Indian black market bone trade. They say workers once dried human bones on the roof and cleaned corpses inside.
Scott Carney

Journalist Scott Carney figures he's worth about $250,000, but that number isn't based on his savings or his assets; it's what Carney thinks his body would fetch if it were broken down into individual parts and sold on what he calls the "red market."

In his new book, also called The Red Market, Carney explores the shadowy but lucrative global marketplace for blood, bones and organs. He tells NPR's Melissa Block that despite being underground, there's no question the red market is thriving.

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4:17pm

Fri June 10, 2011
Music Interviews

From 'Shenandoah' To Afghanistan: George Crumb's 'Winds Of Destiny'

A US Navy sailor waiting to be sent out on a mission in Afghanistan in November 2010.
Paula Bronstein Getty Images

Though the Civil War is a century and a half behind us, our country's involvement in conflict is not. Director Peter Sellars has taken a work by Pulitzer Prize-winning composer George Crumb, based on folk songs of the Civil War, and updated it to the present day.

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3:00pm

Fri June 10, 2011
Commentary

Week In Politics: Weiner; GOP Presidential Field

Melissa Block speaks with our regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Brookings Institution, and David Brooks of The New York Times.

3:00pm

Fri June 10, 2011
National Security

Justice Department Agrees To Plea In Drake Case

The Justice Department has agreed to a plea deal with Thomas Drake, a former National Security Agency employee originally charged with 10 felonies, including violating the Espionage Act. Jane Mayer, staff writer for The New Yorker, joins Melissa Block to talk about how Thomas Drake became accused of being an enemy of the state.

3:00pm

Fri June 10, 2011
Around the Nation

Alaska Releases Palin Emails

Thousands of Sarah Palin's emails from her time as the governor of Alaska were released Friday in Juneau, Alaska. The several foot-high stacks of paper were distributed to reporters on hand trucks.

3:00pm

Fri June 10, 2011
Science

Power May Increase Promiscuity

Anthony Weiner, John Edwards, Arnold Schwarzenegger — men behaving badly, right? It may be more complex than that. Research shows power causes men and women to take risks and imagine themselves as more attractive. New survey research shows that, given power, women are as likely as men to stray.

3:00pm

Fri June 10, 2011
Sports

NBA Faces Contentious Lockout

The NBA is on the verge of a possibly very long, contentious lockout. Melissa Block talks to CNBC sports business reporter Darren Rovell for more.

3:00pm

Fri June 10, 2011
National Security

Gates Rebukes NATO Members On Libya Mission

Defense Secretary Robert Gates, who leaves office at the end of the month, sharply criticized NATO Friday. He noted that all members of the alliance voted for the Libya mission, but less than half have participated. Just 11 weeks into the mission, the "mightiest military alliance in history" is beginning to run short of munitions, requiring the U.S. once more to make up the difference. The U.S. is "in the midst of a deep economic crisis of our own," he said.

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3:00pm

Fri June 10, 2011
Around the Nation

Nikki Haley Feuds With S.C. Legislature

South Carolina's Supreme Court has settled a standoff between Republican Gov. Nikki Haley and the state Legislature. The Legislature won, but the battle seems to be only heating up. Just as the Legislature was wrapping up its regular session earlier this month, Haley ordered the Legislature to return to session. In return, the Senate president pro tempore filed a lawsuit with the state Supreme Court, saying Haley's order violated the separation of powers. The court sided with the Legislature.

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9:38pm

Thu June 9, 2011
Around the Nation

Once A Critic, VA Blogger Seeks To 'Fix' Problems

Alex Horton sits against a wall in Baqubah, Iraq, shortly after a firefight.
Courtesy of Alex Horton

When Alex Horton shipped home from Iraq in 2007, he decided to go to college and get a degree in journalism. He hoped the new, post-Sept. 11 GI Bill would help him out.

"With my bank account dwindling and rent, utility bills, school tuition and other obligations on the table, coupled with the advice of my VA counselor, I bet it all on the post-9/11 GI Bill. And I lost," Horton wrote at the time on his blog, Army of Dude.

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7:33pm

Thu June 9, 2011
Around the Nation

Chicago Man Guilty On 2 Of 3 Terror-Related Charges

A federal terrorism case in Chicago has ended with a split verdict. Jurors found Chicago businessman Tahawwur Rana guilty on two of three counts of providing material support for terrorism. Rana was charged with helping plan the 2008 terrorist attack in Mumbai, India, that left about 170 people dead. He was also accused of helping plot an attack against a Danish newspaper that had published cartoons of the Muslim Prophet Muhammad.

3:00pm

Thu June 9, 2011
NPR Story

Panetta's Confirmation Hearing Gets Choppy

Originally published on Thu June 9, 2011 10:11 pm

Transcript

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

From NPR News, this is All Things Considered, I'm Michele Norris.

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

And I'm Melissa Block.

We go first this hour to Capitol Hill, where CIA Director Leon Panetta appeared at a confirmation hearing for his next likely post, Secretary of Defense. Panetta is expected to sail smoothly through the confirmation process to succeed Robert Gates.

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5:18pm

Wed June 8, 2011
Monkey See

Summer Television: A Time Of 'Men,' Werewolves And Aliens

Andre Braugher, LisaGay Hamilton, Ray Romano and Scott Bakula star on TNT's Men Of A Certain Age.
Danny Feld TNT

Feel like you're drowning in a flood of so-called "reality" television, Canadian series imports and new cable shows?

It's not you, it's TV; specifically, the oddball land of summer television.

As the big networks try to avoid looking like they've gone fishin' for summer and cable amps up its schedule, there's a new universe of programming for small screen fans to sort though. And there's a few standout series worth seeing — and avoiding — in the weeks to come.

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3:45pm

Wed June 8, 2011
The Record

For 2011, The Summer Concert Season Gets A Reboot

Wayne Coyne on stage performing with The Flaming Lips at Sasquatch Music Festival Memorial Day weekend.
Alex Crick for KEXP

Last summer the concert industry, which had grown steadily for a decade, slipped badly. It was a surprise to almost everyone who pays attention to the hugely complicated network of bands, big and small, that tour the country, but looking back, it seems like maybe it was just a matter of time.

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