All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-7pm and Weekends 5-6PM
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Jonese Franklin

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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10:15pm

Tue June 28, 2011
NPR Story

Militants Strike Iconic Kabul Hotel

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

And I'm Melissa Block.

In Afghanistan's capital Kabul tonight, a group of suicide bombers armed with heavy weapons attacked the Inter-Continental Hotel which is popular with foreigners and Afghan VIPs. Loud explosions and gunfire could be heard across the city as the battle raged for hours.

(Soundbite of gunfire)

NATO helicopters were called in to respond to the siege.

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5:14pm

Tue June 28, 2011
Around the Nation

Flooding Won't Overcome Nuclear Plants, Officials Say

Two nuclear power plants in Nebraska, 100 miles apart, are completely surrounded by water. The head of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission visited each Monday for a firsthand inspection. While officials at both plants assure area residents they are safe, critics point to a history of problems and wonder if the facilities are prepared for Missouri floodwaters that have not yet peaked.

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4:08pm

Tue June 28, 2011
Economy

Americans Remain Unsure Of Economy's Future

Although the recession ended two years ago, Americans are still feeling the effects. Consumers are continuing to rely on thrifty measures to push their money further.
Chris Hondros Getty Images

Nearly two years after the official end of the recession, Americans still remain unconvinced.

Consumer confidence has hit an eight-month low, according to a Conference Board report released Tuesday. The group studies how Americans feel about business conditions and the job market.

It turns out consumers aren't feeling so hot about the prospects for the future, which economists say could be a self-fulfilling prophecy.

This can be seen in any parking lot of a big-box store.

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11:12pm

Mon June 27, 2011
Music

The Songs That Make You Proud Of Your Country

Bruce Springsteen, the NPR audience favorite, plays in front of the flag, circa 1984.
SGranitz WireImage

Click the audio link above to hear Frannie Kelley talk to All Things Considered's Michele Norris about your picks for songs that make you feel proud to be from wherever you're from. Though Bruce Springsteen was the clear winner, you also wrote in for Filipino band Up Dharma Down, The Tragically Hip (Canada), Los Tigres del Norte and Marvin Gaye's 1983 performance of "The Star Spangled Banner."

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4:25pm

Mon June 27, 2011
Beginnings: Pregnancy, Childbirth and Beyond

In Mozambique, Grim Prospects For Mother And Child

Many of the women in the community called "The 25th of June" began childbearing as teenagers in Mozambique. They all say that soon after their first periods, they took part in an initiation ritual called okanone that taught them about sex.
Andrea Hsu NPR

As part of "Beginnings," a summer-long series on All Things Considered, Melissa Block traveled to Mozambique to explore maternal health. This is the first of three reports.

In Mozambique in southeastern Africa, the rates of maternal and infant mortality are among the highest in the world.

In her lifetime, a Mozambican woman has a 1 in 37 chance of dying during pregnancy or within a short time after a pregnancy has ended. One in 10 children won't live past their first year. One in 7 die before they reach the age of 5.

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3:52pm

Mon June 27, 2011
Monkey See

'That's Racist!' How A Serious Accusation Became A Commonplace Quip

Sort your laundry into whites and darks? "That's racist," quips one character on Parks and Recreation.
iStockphoto.com

My editor proposed this story about "that's racist" after hearing her young son's friends using it as a joke. Just the night before, it had been a punchline on one of my favorite sitcoms, Parks And Recreation. (Someone calls sorting laundry into whites and darks racist.)

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3:00pm

Mon June 27, 2011
Law

Supreme Court Overturns Calif. Video Game Ban

The Supreme Court has struck down a California law that bans the sale and rental of violent video games to children. In a 7-2 vote, the justices ruled that the law was unconstitutional and that it violated the free speech rights of children.

3:00pm

Mon June 27, 2011
Politics

Bachman Makes It Official

Rep. Michele Bachmann was in Waterloo, Iowa, Monday, where she kicked off her campaign for president.

3:00pm

Mon June 27, 2011
Around the Nation

Blagojevich Convicted On Nearly All Charges

Federal jurors in the corruption trial of former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich have reached a verdict: They convicted him on nearly all charges.

4:36pm

Sun June 26, 2011
Pop Culture

What Story Would You Tell On Jeopardy?

Host Alex Trebek greets celebrity contestants on the set of Jeopardy! For non-celebrity contestants, fame means a 30-second personal anecdote after the first commercial break.
Amanda Edwards Getty Images

Maggie Speak and Robert James are a Jeopardy contestant's best friends: They're the show's main contestant coordinators.

Jeopardy is pretty vigilant about keeping contestants separate from production staff — there's no mingling with host Alex Trebek in the green room. So, the contestant coordinators are really your only friends.

"On the tape day, my biggest responsibility is getting them ready for their stories," James says.

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4:35pm

Sun June 26, 2011
Europe

Tipping Point For The European Union?

iStockphoto.com

When European Union leaders met in Brussels last week, they faced some difficult decisions. For the past year, the EU has continually bailed out its debt-ridden member countries to keep the bloc and its currency afloat. Despite this assistance, Greece may yet default on its obligations, plunging Europe and much of the world into another financial crisis.

This is just the latest challenge for the euro zone, the group of 17 countries that banded their financial destinies together since 1999.

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3:01am

Sun June 26, 2011
Author Interviews

Remembering A 'Babe' Sports Fans Shouldn't Forget

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:43 am

Golf, track, basketball ... Babe Didrikson Zaharias could do it all.
Hulton Archive/Getty

In 2000, Sports Illustrated named its 100 top athletes of the 20th century. There are names you no doubt are familiar with — Babe Ruth, Muhammad Ali, and of course Michael Jordan. But there's also a name that might slip by: Babe Didrikson. She is the only woman in the top 10.

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6:51pm

Sat June 25, 2011
Music Interviews

Ida Maria: Seeing Red

Ida Maria's new album is called Katla.
Courtesy of the artist

Norwegian singer Ida Maria has a voice that demands attention. It's powerful and commanding, and harkens back to a time when Joan Jett, Chrissie Hynde and even Courtney Love ruled the hearts and minds of teenage girls.

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3:00pm

Sat June 25, 2011
Around the Nation

N.Y. Lawmakers Explain Votes On Gay Marriage

State lawmakers made New York the sixth and largest state to legalize gay marriage on Friday night. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with two Republican state senators: Jim Alesi, who voted for the measure, and Dean Skelos, who voted against it.

3:00pm

Sat June 25, 2011
Analysis

Week In News: Gay Marriage, Debt Debate

James Fallows, national correspondent with The Atlantic, talks about the week's news: New York becomes the sixth state to legalize gay marriage; House Majority Leader Eric Cantor walks out of debt ceiling negotiations; and Congress votes on Libya.

3:00pm

Sat June 25, 2011
Politics

Who Really Wants To Be President?

It's been called the worst job in the country. And once you get it, unpopularity is practically certain. But it seems there's never a shortage of presidential candidates. Presidential historian Alvin Felzenberg talks about what it takes to make it into that small group.

3:00pm

Sat June 25, 2011
Science

Our Sewers, Ourselves: What Waste Water Can Tell Us

Archeologists say our garbage provides a glimpse into our actions and values. Now, some scientists say our sewer systems do also. It only takes a teaspoon of waste water to reveal an entire city's eating or drinking habits. Environmental scientist Kevin Thomas talks about what the method can tell us.

3:00pm

Sat June 25, 2011
Environment

Anticipating Climate Catastrophe, But With Optimism

Author Paul Gilding has served as head of Greenpeace International, led two companies, and advised both Fortune 500 corporations and community-based NGOs.
Bloomsbury Press

Civilization is on a collision course. That's the message Paul Gilding, the former head of Greenpeace International, is sounding in his new book, The Great Disruption.

The facts, as Gilding spells them out, are frightening. The United Nations predicts the world's population will reach 9.3 billion by 2050 and humans are already using 140 percent of the Earth's resources.

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4:22pm

Fri June 24, 2011
Music Interviews

Will Johnson, Man Of Many Bands, Embraces Discomfort

Will Johnson (second from right) with Centro-Matic. The band's new album is called Candidate Waltz.
Matt Pence

Will Johnson may be one of the hardest-working people in indie rock. He leads two bands, records as a solo artist and plays as a sideman in a host of other projects. Johnson is originally from Denton, Texas, and his music — be it the lonesome balladry of South San Gabriel or the rock 'n' roll machine that is Centro-Matic — is inspired by the distinctive sounds of that state.

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3:00pm

Fri June 24, 2011
Around the Nation

Souris River Continues To Inundate Minot, N.D.

In North Dakota, the Souris River has reached record levels faster than anyone had expected. Already, portions of Minot, N.D., are inundated, and it's only expected to get worse. Upstream of Minot, the town of Burlington has given up sandbagging efforts. Jerome Gruenberg, the town's mayor, has said, "We're no longer able to save the city." Robert Siegel speaks with Kim Fundingsland, writer for the Minot Daily News, about the latest on the catastrophic flooding.

3:00pm

Fri June 24, 2011
Sports

U.S., Mexico Face Off For Regional Soccer Supremacy

About 90,000 people are expected to fill the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, Calif., Saturday, to watch the latest match in a long-running soccer rivalry: The United States against Mexico. They're meeting in the finals of the Gold Cup. Robert Siegel talks to sportswriter Stefan Fatsis for more.

3:00pm

Fri June 24, 2011
Politics

House Votes On Libya Resolutions

The House voted Friday on two resolutions dealing with NATO-led military operations in Libya. The first would have authorized U.S. operations for a year — that failed. The second would have placed severe funding limits on American involvement in the conflict — that failed too.

3:00pm

Fri June 24, 2011
Africa

Libyan Rebels, Loyalists Clash In Tunisia Border Town

Until several months ago, the Tunisian town of Djerba was a placid, sun-bleached stretch of the Mediterranean coast with white-washed hotels that catered mainly to vacationers from Europe.

But the Tunisian revolution that began last December scared away the foreign tourists. And now the fighting in Libya is spilling over the border and turning the town into a place of intrigue.

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3:00pm

Fri June 24, 2011
Commentary

Week In Politics: Deficit; GOP Presidential Field

Robert Siegel speaks with our regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Brookings Institution, and David Brooks of The New York Times.

3:00pm

Fri June 24, 2011
Politics

Obama Announces Partnership To Create Factory Jobs

President Obama announced a new manufacturing partnership Friday with businesses and universities. It's designed to make U.S. factories more competitive — and boost the number of good-paying factory jobs.

1:34pm

Fri June 24, 2011
Movie Interviews

Tom Hanks Fights Cynicism With Cinema In 'Crowne'

Back To School: Tom Hanks plays a middle-aged man who reinvents himself by enrolling at his local college after he loses his longtime job at a big-box company.
Bruce Talamon Universal

In his long Hollywood career, Tom Hanks has often played the hopeful character — so his latest film, about reinvention amid recession, isn't much of a stretch.

It's called Larry Crowne and in it, Hanks plays the ever-optimistic Larry, a loyal employee of a big-box store whose life gets turned upside-down when he's unceremoniously downsized. Underwater on his mortgage and suddenly unemployed, Larry decides to reinvent himself by heading off to community college, where he falls in with a colorful group of scooter-riding students and even develops a crush on his teacher.

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4:08pm

Thu June 23, 2011
Around the Nation

A Squash's Journey: From The Shelf To The Hungry

Walmart store manager Emily Bowman notices some yellow squash with brown spots — and takes about 40 off the shelves and puts them on a donation cart.
Pam Fessler NPR

Americans waste an estimated 150 billion pounds of food a year. A lot of it comes from grocery stores and other retailers.

Food banks increasingly are trying to get their hands on some of that food to help feed the hungry.

The big challenge is time. It's a race to get the groceries off the shelves, and into the mouths of those who need it before it spoils.

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3:03pm

Thu June 23, 2011
Books

Pottermore Brings Harry Potter To The Digital World

Starting this fall, for the first time, the Harry Potter novels will be available as e-books.

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3:00pm

Thu June 23, 2011
Around the Nation

Bostonians Have Mixed Reactions To Bulger's Arrest

Reputed mob boss Whitey Bulger is legendary in South Boston. In the neighborhood where he reigned, some think it's about time the FBI caught up with him. Others, despite allegations that he committed 19 murders, say he's an elderly man who should be allowed to go on with his life. After 16 years on the run, Bulger remains a controversial figure in his hometown.

3:00pm

Thu June 23, 2011
Around the Nation

Legendary Mobster Hides In Plain Sight

For 15 years, authorities pursued the legendary crime boss James "Whitey" Bulger. When his capture was announced Thursday, it came to light that one of the most wanted men in America was living out a relatively public life in the upscale California community of Santa Monica. Robert Siegel talks with former U.S. marshal Victor Oboyski about how one goes about hiding in plain sight.

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