All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-7pm and Weekends 5-6PM
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Jonese Franklin

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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3:00pm

Wed July 13, 2011
NPR Story

Hearses, Limos And The Collectors Who Love Them

The Professional Car Society is not for professional car collectors. It's for people who love cars that were built for a profession: things like hearses, limos and ambulances. A good number of its members are funeral directors and EMTs who worked with these cars when they were new.

3:00pm

Wed July 13, 2011
NPR Story

Rep. Roskam Discusses Budget Talks

Representative Peter Roskam (IL-R) talks to Robert Siegel about the deficit-reduction talks — and Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell's proposal for breaking the impasse.

3:00pm

Wed July 13, 2011
NPR Story

Murdoch Withdraws Bid For BSkyB

On Wednesday, News Corp announced it is withdrawing its bid for full control of British broadcaster BSkyB. The announcement came as Parliament debated the Murdoch newspaper scandal and prepared to vote across party lines against the BSkyB deal. Prime Minister David Cameron strongly condemned News Corp practices and announced an inquiry into the hacking scandal, police corruption, and Murdoch's influence on the political establishment — an influence that is now greatly diminished.

3:00pm

Wed July 13, 2011
Politics

Obama Raises $86 Million For Re-Election

President Obama raised a whopping $86 million in the last quarter for his re-election committee and the national Democratic Party.

3:32pm

Tue July 12, 2011
Television

TV Continues To Cash In On Pawn Show Popularity

Pawn Shop sign
iStockphoto.com

What happens when you cross CBS's The Price is Right with PBS's Antiques Roadshow?

You get NBC's It's Worth What?, a game show in which contestants are asked to guess the value of objects found anywhere from your neighbor's attic to international museums.

It's Worth What? is the latest in more than a dozen shows that deal with antiques or junk — depending on how you spin it. It also represents the beginning of a cable craze crossing over to broadcast — and the trend isn't over yet.

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1:22pm

Tue July 12, 2011
The Road Back To Work

Hope: A Precious Commodity In This Job Market

Randy Howland, 51, of St. Louis, was unemployed for more than a year before landing a $10 an hour customer service job in February. Howland is now searching for a new job with better pay and hours.
Whitney Curtis for NPR

Part of an ongoing series

In the months since Randy Howland, 51, was first hired as a customer service representative, his excitement having a job — any job — has turned to defeat.

"This is an anniversary day," says Randy into a recorder he's using to keep audio diaries for NPR's Road Back to Work series. "I've had my $10 an hour job now for four months."

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3:00pm

Mon July 11, 2011
Technology

Microsoft Makes Hacking Kinect Easier

The Kinect has been a big success for Microsoft's Xbox. It's a motion sensor that lets you play video games by moving your body — no controller of any kind necessary. Computer engineers and hobbyists have hacked it to do all sorts of amazing things: They're using the motion sensor to browse the Web without touching anything, navigate Google Earth with slight bodily movements, and even aid with physical rehabilitation. Perhaps soon, these innovations will let you wave a finger and bring up the Internet on your kitchen wall.

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3:00pm

Mon July 11, 2011
From Our Listeners

Letters: Arkansas Earthquakes; 'Dig This'

Michele Norris and Robert Siegel read letters from listeners.

3:00pm

Mon July 11, 2011
History

When Did The U.S. Last Default On Treasury Bonds?

A potential default on U.S. treasury bonds isn't as unprecedented as politicians would have you think. In 1979, the U.S. failed to make timely payments to its bondholders — and the results weren't pretty. Robert Siegel speaks with Ball State University finance professor Terry Zivney, who co-authored a journal article called "The Day the United States Defaulted on Treasury Bills," about the results of that last default.

3:00pm

Mon July 11, 2011
Arts & Life

Summer Sounds: Farm Work

Amy Dickinson describes the incident that makes her think of the sound of shovels penetrating hard dirt as part of our series Summer Sounds. Her dad once forced Amy, her sisters and a cousin to dig in the hot summer sun in the fruitless pursuit of saving a crop.

3:00pm

Mon July 11, 2011
Politics

President Obama Discusses Debt Ceiling Talks

With time running out to raise the nation's debt ceiling, President Obama hosted another bargaining session with leaders of Congress Monday. He's trying to persuade both Republicans and Democrats to compromise on a plan to shave trillions of dollars from the federal deficit. "I'm prepared to take on significant heat from my party to get something done. And I expect the other side should be willing to do the same thing, if they mean what they say: that this is important," he said.

3:00pm

Mon July 11, 2011
Politics

Does The Deficit Impasse Look Insoluble?

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

Well, joining us now to talk about what all of this means is NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Hi, Mara.

MARA LIASSON: Hi, Robert.

SIEGEL: What's happening here? Is all this theater or did today's dueling news conferences actually serve some purpose?

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3:00pm

Mon July 11, 2011
NPR Story

Panetta Speaks On Attacks Against U.S. Troops In Iraq

Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta (left) sits with Lt. Gen. Lloyd Austin, the top U.S. commander in Iraq, as they fly in a Black Hawk helicopter over Baghdad on Monday.
Paul J. Richards AP

Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta has been on the job for all of 11 days and he's already frustrated with Iraq.

"I'd like things to move a lot faster here, frankly, in terms of the decision-making process. I'd like them to make a decision, you know: Do they want us to stay? Don't they want us to stay? ... But damn it, make a decision," he said during a visit to Baghdad on Monday following a brief trip to Afghanistan. It's Panetta's first trip to the warzones since assuming his new job last week.

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3:00pm

Mon July 11, 2011
NPR Story

When Asked To Disclose Laptop Password, Woman Invokes 5th Amendment

Robert Siegel talks with Declan McCullagh, chief political correspondent for CNET, about a federal case in which Ramona Fricosu, a Colorado woman, is refusing to disclose a laptop password to authorities — arguing it would violate her Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination. Fricosu is facing several charges related to a mortgage scam. The encrypted laptop was seized from her bedroom during a police raid. McCullagh tells us more about the case — and what legal implications it may have.

3:00pm

Mon July 11, 2011
NPR Story

Polls: Americans Don't Connect With Budget Crisis

Polling shows that despite Washington's focus on getting a budget deal and keeping the country out of default, most Americans aren't connecting with the crisis. We asked people in Chicago, Ohio and the Bay Area what default means to them.

3:00pm

Mon July 11, 2011
NPR Story

Unions, Business Owners Face Off In Jobs Debate

With unemployment on the rise, members of the political left and right are seeking to advance their own takes on what to do about the economy. In Washington Monday, the AFL-CIO co-hosted a press conference to offer its view. Not far away, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce held its own jobs summit.

5:08pm

Sun July 10, 2011
World

Pakistan Withholds $800 Million In Aid To Pakistan

The U.S. is withholding $800 million in military assistance to Pakistan. NPR's Jackie Northam and host Guy Raz discuss the latest example of the strain between the two allies in the wake of Osama bin Laden's killing.

5:08pm

Sun July 10, 2011
Sports

U.S. Women Head To World Cup Semifinals

There was high drama Sunday in the women's World Cup soccer tournament: The U.S. team got a last-second, come-from-behind victory over Brazil. NPR's Tom Goldman fills in host Guy Raz on how the Americans pulled it off in Dresden, Germany.

3:00pm

Sun July 10, 2011
Media

'News Of The World' Shuts Down After Scandal

Originally published on Sun July 10, 2011 6:26 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, host: After 168 years of being read aloud at British breakfast tables, the News of the World published its final edition today. Media tycoon Rupert Murdoch shut down the tabloid to try and contain a growing phone tapping scandal. The paper's accused of illegally hacking into the cell phones of thousands of sports stars and newsmakers, including a young murder victim.

Vicki Barker reports from London on the paper's final day.

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3:00pm

Sun July 10, 2011
Politics

Obama, Lawmakers Have Another Go At Debt Talks

President Obama is meeting with Capitol Hill leaders again Sunday to talk about the deal they are trying to strike on the debt ceiling and deficit reduction. The weekend talks are the latest symbol of seriousness in the long-running struggle that is nearing a deadline of potential default on federal debt. NPR's Ari Shapiro gives host Guy Raz the latest.

7:39pm

Sat July 9, 2011
A Blog Supreme

What's With All The Jazz Tribute Albums?

Michael Jackson Courtesy of the artist

Well, it's complicated.

More than so many other kinds of music, jazz takes its tradition seriously. There's about 100 years' worth, and most of it has been passed down in sound: by playing with, listening to and studying with the masters. So it makes sense that jazz musicians feel such visceral connections to their ancestors, whether spiritual, intellectual, educational, inspirational, aspirational or even just marketable.

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4:13pm

Sat July 9, 2011
Music Interviews

Ledisi: A Singer's Second Life

Ledisi's fifth and latest album is called Pieces of Me.
Courtesy of the artist

A decade into her career as an R&B artist, it's hard to believe Ledisi actually got her start in opera. Beginning at age eight and continuing through her studies at UC Berkeley, the singer and songwriter spent years honing her operatic voice before switching to R&B and soul. However, she tells Weekend All Things Considered host Guy Raz that the two worlds aren't so different — especially when it comes to the skills the singers cultivate.

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3:00pm

Sat July 9, 2011
NPR Story

Week In News: U.K. 'News Of The World' Scandal

Rupert Murdoch's tabloid News of the World closes its doors Sunday after more than a century and a half in business. That follows the revelation that reporters there tapped the phones of crime victims, dead soldiers and even the royal family to get scoops for their paper. Host Guy Raz speaks with James Fallows of The Atlantic about this story and others from the past week.

2:45pm

Sat July 9, 2011
Author Interviews

The Troubled History Of The Supermarket Tomato

A worker inspects tomatoes at the West Coast Tomato plant in Palmetto, Fla. The Sunshine State produces one-third of all fresh tomatoes in the U.S.
Robert Browman Getty Images

Supermarket tomatoes may look delicious — smooth, red and unblemished — but for the most part, they taste like nothing at all.

"I think tomatoes in grocery stores are like food porn in the purest sense of the word," author Barry Estabrook tells Weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz. "They tantalize you, they make you think, but they don't deliver."

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9:44pm

Fri July 8, 2011
Remembrances

Former First Lady Betty Ford Dies At 93

Former first lady Betty Ford has died at the age of 93.

During her life she helped change the way Americans think and talk about breast cancer, women's rights and substance abuse.

But, before she became a first lady, an advocate for women's rights and an inspiration to people struggling with addiction, Betty Ford was a dancer.

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8:00pm

Fri July 8, 2011
The End Of The Space Shuttle Era

From The Movies, Lessons On Privatizing Outer Space

Hollywood history is littered with cautionary tales about corporate takeovers of outer space, but in 2001: A Space Odyssey, things looked oddly familiar: Interstellar travelers flew Pan Am and stayed in Hilton hotels.
MGM

During the space race in the 1960s, only governments had deep enough pockets to send humans into orbit. Now, with many of the world's governments in hock up to their eyeballs and NASA's space shuttle going into retirement, commercial ventures are poised to pick up where the shuttle leaves off.

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3:00pm

Fri July 8, 2011
Analysis

Week In Politics: Unemployment Numbers; Debt Ceiling

Michele Norris reviews the week in politics with our regular commentators E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Brookings Institution, and David Brooks of The New York Times.

3:00pm

Fri July 8, 2011
NPR Story

Obama Tries To Put Good Face On Bad Job Numbers

The White House tried to put as good a face as possible on bad jobs numbers: The private sector added 57,000 jobs in June. Republicans jumped right in and said no "job killing" tax hikes. Did threading the needle get even more complicated?

3:00pm

Fri July 8, 2011
NPR Story

Jobs Report Offers Disappointing Numbers

The unemployment rate notched up again in June, and the number of new jobs created was far less than what was expected. Payrolls increased by just 18,000 — less than the prior month and way below the level of job creation earlier in the year.

3:00pm

Fri July 8, 2011
NPR Story

Sen. Whitehouse Discusses Debt Talks

Michele Norris speaks with Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-RI, about the debt ceiling talks. He has said that the White House may not have the Democrats, depending on what is being proposed.

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