All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-7pm and Weekends 5-6PM
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Jonese Franklin

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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3:00pm

Fri July 8, 2011
NPR Story

Jobs Report Offers Disappointing Numbers

The unemployment rate notched up again in June, and the number of new jobs created was far less than what was expected. Payrolls increased by just 18,000 — less than the prior month and way below the level of job creation earlier in the year.

3:00pm

Fri July 8, 2011
NPR Story

Sen. Whitehouse Discusses Debt Talks

Michele Norris speaks with Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-RI, about the debt ceiling talks. He has said that the White House may not have the Democrats, depending on what is being proposed.

3:00pm

Fri July 8, 2011
Analysis

Week In Politics: Unemployment Numbers; Debt Ceiling

Michele Norris reviews the week in politics with our regular commentators E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Brookings Institution, and David Brooks of The New York Times.

11:35am

Fri July 8, 2011
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

The Inspiration Gap And The Shuttle's Last Launch

The Rotating Service Structure (L) swings back to reveal the space shuttle Atlantis at Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida, on July 7, 2011. The U.S. space program has served as a source of inspiration to generations of Americans.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Back in 1972 the library in my hometown wasn't very big. But its size didn't matter much to my 10-year-old sensibilities. That was the year I discovered their collection on the U.S. space program. Those few books where big enough to help change my life.

I spent the whole summer poring over images taken by NASA astronauts and space probes. I decided one day, no matter what, I was going to be a scientist too.

That experience turns out to be almost universal for the last three generations of U.S. scientists.

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3:00pm

Thu July 7, 2011
NPR Story

How Do Changing Demographics Impact Ads?

Life in advertising is multicultural — how does it compare to real life, and how is advertising selling the "All-American" dream? Michele Norris talks to Jimmy Smith, creative director at TBWA/Chiat/Day, and Roberto Orci , president of Acento ad agency, for more.

3:00pm

Thu July 7, 2011
NPR Story

Perp Walk: The History Of Parading Suspects

Michele Norris talks with David Krajicek about the history of the so-called perp walk — and why law enforcement uses it, particularly in New York City. They discuss why the media is drawn to these and talk about some famous perp walks in the U.S.

3:00pm

Thu July 7, 2011
Sports

At Women's World Cup, U.S. Faces Difficult Obstacle

The U.S. women were on a roll heading into Wednesday's match against Sweden in the Women's World Cup. But after a 2-1 upset loss, the Americans find their road to reclaiming the cup much harder now. The next obstacle: a quarterfinal match against a very tough Brazilian team. Sportswriter Stefan Fatsis joins Michele Norris from Berlin for a preview.

3:00pm

Thu July 7, 2011
Politics

What Do We Know About The Budget Talks?

What do we know about what President Obama is discussing with top leaders from both parties in Congress Thursday and through the weekend? What is their game plan for raising the debt ceiling and bending down the deficit curve? Mara Liasson discusses the debt ceiling talks with Melissa Block.

3:00pm

Thu July 7, 2011
Politics

Rep. Price Discusses Budget Talks

Melissa Block speaks with Georgia Republican Rep. Tom Price, a member of the Budget Committee and the Ways and Means Committee. He is also chairman of the House Republican Policy Committee. Price offers his take on the debt ceiling negotiations.

3:00pm

Thu July 7, 2011
Space

NASA Prepares For Its Last Shuttle Mission

With the launch of NASA's last-ever shuttle mission set for Friday morning, NPR's Nell GreenfieldBoyce describes the scene at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

11:57am

Thu July 7, 2011
Books We Like

G.R.R. Martin's Complex Epic For An Ambivalent Age

iStockphoto.com

In 2005 I wrote a review of George R. R. Martin's novel, A Feast for Crows, in which I called him "the American Tolkien." That phrase has stuck to him, which is what I meant it to do. I think Martin's fantasy series A Song of Ice and Fire is the great epic of our era. It's an epic for a more profane, more sardonic, more ambivalent age than the one Tolkien lived in. Tolkien was a veteran of the Somme, and wrote during Word War II, when it really seemed like the fate of civilization was hanging in the balance. Now we can't even agree on what civilization is.

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3:29pm

Wed July 6, 2011
Music Reviews

James Farm: Jazz Heavyweights Band Together

James Farm combines the talents of four in-demand jazz musicians: Matt Penman (from left), Joshua Redman, Aaron Parks, Eric Harland.
Jimmy Katz

In 2009, four busy jazz musicians — saxophonist Joshua Redman, pianist Aaron Parks, bassist Matt Penman and drummer Eric Harland — gathered on a rare off day to see what they might cook up together. Out of that came a band they call James Farm, and an album of the same name.

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3:05pm

Wed July 6, 2011
Beginnings: Pregnancy, Childbirth and Beyond

In Mozambique, A Fight To Keep Babies HIV-Free

Lucrecia Silva and her daughter, Helena, are both HIV-positive. They wait as a nurse in Macia writes a prescription for Helena's anti-retroviral drugs.
Andrea Hsu NPR

The southeastern African nation of Mozambique has some of the highest HIV rates in the world. Within Mozambique, Gaza province in the south of the country is a hot zone for HIV infection. There, 25 percent of people ages 15 to 49 are HIV-positive. Among women in Gaza, the number is even higher: Thirty percent are infected with HIV.

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3:00pm

Wed July 6, 2011
NPR Story

Government Shutdown Continues In Minnesota

Wednesday is the 6th day of the Minnesota state government shutdown. Republican and Democrat lawmakers there are locked in a battle over the state budget. Michele Norris talks to Minnesota Public Radio's Tom Scheck for a look inside the budget impasse.

5:55pm

Tue July 5, 2011
Remembrances

Artist Cy Twombly Dies At 83

American artist Cy Twombly died Tuesday in Rome. He was 83. Melissa Block speaks with Josef Helfenstein, the director of the Menil Collection in Houston, where much of Twombly's art is on display.

3:50pm

Tue July 5, 2011
Music Reviews

Femi And Seun Kuti Keep Their Father's Rebellious Beat

Femi Kuti and Seun Anikulapo-Kuti.
Julien Mignot; Kelechi Amadiobi Courtesy of Knitting Factory Records

Nigeria's Fela Kuti was the creator of Afrobeat, a funky, brassy, fiercely political style of music that earned a worldwide following before Fela's death in 1997. That following has only grown in the years since, in part because two of Fela's sons, Femi and Seun, carry on the Afrobeat tradition with bands, tours and recordings of their own.

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3:00pm

Mon July 4, 2011
NPR Story

Letters: Lorenzo Charles

Michele Norris reads letters from listeners.

3:00pm

Mon July 4, 2011
NPR Story

Fewer People Participate In Civil War Reenactments

Recently there's been a little more interest than usual in the Civil War, owing to the 150th anniversary of the historic event. Even so, fewer people are donning Union and Confederate gear and participating in historical reenactments. And as those who have been re-enacting for decades retire from the battlefields, many wonder who will take their place.

3:00pm

Mon July 4, 2011
NPR Story

Chavez Returns To Venezuela

Just when Venezuelans were talking about President Hugo Chavez's future and thinking about what lies ahead if he doesn't run for reelection, Chavez returned to Caracas after cancer surgery in Cuba. Michele Norris talks with NPR's Juan Forero.

3:00pm

Mon July 4, 2011
NPR Story

In Libya, Regional Divide Mirrors Disparities

In Libya, many supporters of Moammar Gadhafi say the leader has used the country's oil money to provide real benefits to the people, including subsidized housing, free health care and education. Critics say those benefits were unequally distributed, with favored groups around Tripoli and the western part of the country getting the lion's share — and those in the east, around Benghazi, getting the least. They say the country's political divide mirrors an economic one.

3:00pm

Mon July 4, 2011
NPR Story

Summer Sounds: Firecrackers

Listener Bev Brown of Georgetown, Texas, tells us about her Summer Sound. Growing up on the plains of southeastern South Dakota, Brown says her father was the Fireworks Man. Every Fourth of July of her childhood, her dad planned and "shot" the Sioux Falls municipal fireworks show.

3:00pm

Mon July 4, 2011
NPR Story

Do America's Changing Demographics Impact Politics?

Michele Norris talks with Ron Brownstein of National Journal about how the changing U.S. demographics are shifting the political landscape for 2012.

3:00pm

Mon July 4, 2011
NPR Story

Fire-Ravaged Southwest Prepares For Rainy Season

Teams of firefighters and disaster management officials are going into already-burned areas of the Southwest to figure out how to prevent flooding now that the rainy season is beginning. They're looking for debris that's blocking streams — and for areas now devoid of trees that held together the soil.

3:00pm

Mon July 4, 2011
Music

Steve Martin Talks About His Fourth Of July Song

Michele Norris talks with Steve Martin about his Fourth of July song, "Me & Paul Revere," sung from the point of view of the horse. He will perform it live on "A Capitol Fourth" — and for Michele.

3:00pm

Mon July 4, 2011
Politics

GOP Candidates Stump On The Fourth Of July

Originally published on Wed August 24, 2011 11:51 am

Transcript

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

From NPR News, it's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Michele Norris.

On this Independence Day, most of the nation gets to take the day off work, but not the Republican presidential candidates. Today, they were hard at work, marching in parades, shaking hands at barbeques and showing off the red, white and blue.

They stuck mostly to the states with the earliest voting contests - Iowa and New Hampshire - as NPR's Robert Smith reports.

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11:03am

Mon July 4, 2011
The Baby Project

Naming Trends And How Parents-To-Be Face 'Baby-Name Hostility'

iStockphoto.com

When people find out they're expecting, choosing a name for their baby can be one of their most stressful tasks.

Part of that stress is because there has been a "baby-naming revolution" over the last half-century, says Laura Wattenberg, who wrote The Baby Name Wizard: A Magical Method for Finding the Perfect Name for Your Baby.

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4:28pm

Sun July 3, 2011
Economy

Debt Showdown: Road To Another Financial Disaster?

Aug. 2: the day of debt reckoning. According to President Obama, the U.S. will default on its obligations that day if Congress does not raise the debt ceiling. With this debt-ocalypse just under a month away, one begins to think about what would happen if Americans wake up that morning to find Congress still deadlocked.

Annie Lowrey, business reporter for Slate, imagines a worst-case scenario.

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3:00pm

Sun July 3, 2011
Business

CEO Salaries Continues To Rise

The economy is still on the road to recovery, but CEOs seem to be doing just fine. A new study reveals the median pay for a CEO at a top-200 company last year was $10.8 million, up 23 percent in just a year. P.J. Joshi of The New York Times discusses why CEOs get the ever-bigger bucks while most workers are barely staying even.

5:06pm

Sat July 2, 2011
Music Interviews

No Flow? Rap Rebirth Can Help

Jesse Kramer, 24, writes made-to-order rhymes for customers of his website, Rap Rebirth.
Courtesy of Jesse Kramer

If your flow has lost its get-up-and-go, you may need to call Jesse Kramer.

The 24-year-old runs a website called Rap Rebirth, where, for a fee, he offers custom rap lyrics in any style you chose — anywhere from a verse to an entire album. Kramer tells Weekend All Things Considered host Guy Raz that a wide range of artists use his services.

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4:27pm

Sat July 2, 2011
Author Interviews

In Race To South Pole, Scott Lost ... Or Did He?

A member of the Terra Nova Expedition (or British Antarctic Exploration team) travels by dogsled in front of a weathered iceberg, circa 1910 or 1911.
Herbert George Ponting The Library of Congress

The early 20th century was the heroic age of Antarctic exploration. Teams of explorers from multiple countries were fighting to be the first to reach the South Pole.

The man who would ultimately get there first — in December 1911 — was the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen. He went with a small team and a pack of sled dogs. At the time it was seen as humiliating defeat for Britain and its team led by Robert Falcon Scott.

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