All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-7pm and Weekends 5-6PM
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Jonese Franklin

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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1:21pm

Sun August 7, 2011
Movies

Hollywood's Query: Cowboys, Aliens, Smurfs, or Apes?

Signs of a battle: Smurfs and apes spar with an upcoming movie, Columbiana, outside LA's ArcLight Hollywood theater.
Rick Holter NPR

Weekends on All Things Considered just wrapped a week of production in LA. And we found out it's hard to spend much time here without movies on the mind.

At the box office, this month so far has been one weird creature flick after another battling for the top spot. Cowboys and Aliens just about tied The Smurfs last weekend. But this weekend's Rise of the Planet of the Apes smashed them both.

We hit the streets outside LA's luxurious ArcLight HollyWood Theater to pose one simple question: Cowboys, aliens, Smurfs, or apes?

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12:17pm

Sun August 7, 2011
Music Lists

Greetings From L.A.! 'Global Village' Picks Local Favorites

The Los Angeles band Cambalache specializes in son jarocho, a style from Mexico's Gulf Coast.
Courtesy of the artist

When weekends on All Things Considered calls upon Betto Arcos to share the music he's been playing on his KPFK program Global Village, the conversation usually takes place in separate studios on opposite sides of the country. This week, however, the show is coming to you from Los Angeles and the whole gang is together.

It's only natural, then, for this week's picks to have an L.A. theme. Arcos chats with guest host David Greene about some about some of his favorite new releases from Angelino musicians.

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4:49pm

Sat August 6, 2011
Movie Interviews

'Stand By Me': A Love Letter To Childhood Innocence

The quintessential coming-of-age film Stand By Me celebrates it's 25th anniversary this year. The movie was released in the summer of 1986 and tells the story of four twelve-year-old boys in a small town in Oregon and the Labor Day weekend that changed their lives forever.

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2:59pm

Sat August 6, 2011
Music Interviews

The Strange Alchemy Of Fool's Gold

Fool's Gold founding members Luke Top (second from left) and Lewis Pesacov (center) discuss the changes they've made on the band's latest album, Leave No Trace.
Courtesy of the artist

On its debut album, the L.A. band Fool's Gold presented an unusual marriage of influences, pairing African melodies with Hebrew lyrics. The record won over legions of fans and caught the attention of critics, who described it with words like "beguiling" and "joyous."

Fool's Gold's newest album is called Leave No Trace, and there's little trace left of Hebrew on it — the lyrics are mostly in English. In a conversation with NPR's David Greene, vocalist Luke Top and guitarist Lewis Pesacov, the band's two founding members, explain the new direction.

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10:30pm

Fri August 5, 2011
NPR Story

S&P Downgrades U.S. Credit Rating

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, host: This is live special coverage from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block on an evening when Standard and Poor's has moved to downgrade the US credit rating. The ratings agency lowered the U.S. long-term rating from AAA to AA-plus. By way of explanation, S&P said, among other things, that it is pessimistic about the ability of Congress and the administration to stabilize the U.S. debt. It said the recent political brinksmanship over the debt shows America's policy-making to be less stable and predictable than thought.

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3:29pm

Fri August 5, 2011
Culture And Traditions

In Bolivia, Strollers Compete With Baby Slings

A young child wrapped in an aguayo, a traditional sling, on mother's back in La Paz, Bolivia.
Anthony Cassidy Getty Images

In the U.S., fabric baby slings that carry an infant close to a mother's body are increasingly popular.

Indigenous Bolivian women have been using the technique for centuries — and many embrace it as a connection to their past.

But today, some young women in Bolivia have mixed feelings about the bundles, known as aguayos, and sometimes they cause tension between mothers and daughters.

A Desire To Be 'Western'

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3:00pm

Fri August 5, 2011
NPR Story

Unemployment Drops To 9.1 Percent

Job growth has faltered significantly in recent months. But, according to the Labor Department, there was a slight decrease in unemployment last month, falling to 9.1 percent. At the same time, employers added more new jobs than expected.

1:58pm

Fri August 5, 2011
Planet Money

Why Are Wedding Dresses So Expensive?

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 3:45 pm

New York International Bridal Week

Shopping for a wedding dress is strange. You have to make an appointment. You're expected to bring family and friends. The salespeople say things like, "You'll remember this forever."

When I bought my dress a few months ago, I couldn't stop thinking about how emotional it all was — and how expensive.

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5:49pm

Thu August 4, 2011
Law

Polygamist Leader Convicted On Sex Assault Charges

Melissa Block talks to NPR's Wade Goodwyn, who has been following the trial of polygamist leader Warren Jeffs. A Texas jury convicted Jeffs on child sexual assault charges.

5:26pm

Thu August 4, 2011
Commentary

Summer Sounds: Movies

Film critic Scott Mantz remembers spending his summers inside movie theaters — and those soundtracks are his Summer Sounds.

4:30pm

Thu August 4, 2011
Economy

White House Sets Sights On Job Creation

Now that the debt ceiling debate is over, the Obama administration is promising a renewed effort to create jobs. But what's the best way to stimulate hiring? Melissa Block talks with economists Russell Roberts and Jared Bernstein about their views. Roberts is a professor at George Mason University and a research fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution. Bernstein is a senior fellow at The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and a former member of President Obama's economic team.

4:30pm

Thu August 4, 2011
Book Reviews

Book Review: The Lotus Singers

Alan Cheuse reviews a collection of short fiction from authors in South Asia, The Lotus Singers. The stories are from writers in India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh — among other countries.

3:23pm

Thu August 4, 2011
Music Reviews

Serengeti: Play Your Part

Serengeti, a.k.a. David Cohn, carries on a tradition of story songs on his latest album, Family & Friends.
Jacob Hand Courtesy of the artist

If the voices on Serengeti's songs often sound like they don't they belong to a rapper, that's the idea. More than any MC working, Serengeti (born David Cohn) writes story songs, in which he assumes the identities of the characters he creates. Sometimes these characters recur — like Kenny, the middle-aged sports enthusiast and rabid Brian Dennehy fan, whom Serengeti dreamed up on his 2006 album, Dennehy.

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3:00pm

Thu August 4, 2011
NPR Story

L.A. County Refuses To Turn Over Records On Child Deaths

Los Angeles County supervisors are refusing to turn over subpoenaed records involving the deaths of youngsters under supervision by the Department of Children and Family Services. The state auditor, who is also looking at child deaths in Alameda, Fresno and Sacramento, says L.A. county's refusal is a crime. The Legislature ordered an investigation into the L.A. deaths earlier this year after a Los Angeles Times report found that more than 70 children have died since 2008 of abuse or neglect after coming under the purview of county social workers.

3:00pm

Thu August 4, 2011
Economy

White House Sets Sights On Job Creation

Now that the debt ceiling debate is over, the Obama administration is promising a renewed effort to create jobs. But what's the best way to stimulate hiring? Melissa Block talks with economists Russell Roberts and Jared Bernstein about their views. Roberts is a professor at George Mason University and a research fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution. Bernstein is a senior fellow at The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and a former member of President Obama's economic team.

2:30pm

Thu August 4, 2011
The Record

The 'Father' Of Jazz Festivals Takes Newport Non-Profit

George Wein has managed the Newport Jazz and Folk Festivals for almost six decades. This year, he's making an important change to keep the festivals running.
Catherine Welch NPR

The 57th Newport Jazz Festival kicks off Friday in Newport, Rhode Island. The thousands of attendees grooving out to jazz may not be able to hear it, but festival's founder, George Wein, has taken both the Newport Jazz and Newport Folk festivals in a new direction this year.

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3:53pm

Wed August 3, 2011
Music

Your Songs For The Delivery Room

A pregnant woman wearing headphones, possibly working on her delivery playlist.
Richard Semík istockphoto.com

Last Friday, we heard a story about one woman's soundtrack to her son's birth. We then asked you to tell us about the music you listened to while you or your partner gave birth. The stories you sent in were moving-- and funny. "Push It" by Salt 'n' Pepa seems to be a clear favorite. One birth playlist included the Star Wars theme. And then there were the accidental soundtracks.

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7:42pm

Tue August 2, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Medicare, Medicaid Advocates Cast Wary Eye On Budget Deal

Medicare and Medicaid have so far dodged the budget knives wielded by the GOP. But those who depend on the programs know that their luck may soon be running out, thanks to the budget deal signed by President Obama on Tuesday.

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7:48pm

Mon August 1, 2011
Economy

House Passes Debt Ceiling Bill

The House passes the bill to raise the debt ceiling. The final vote was 269 to 161. During the vote, Rep. Gabrielle Giffords made an appearance on the House floor for the first time since she was severely wounded by a gunman in January. She voted in favor for the bill. Melissa Block talks to NPR's Andrea Seabrook for more.

7:25pm

Mon August 1, 2011
Economy

House Votes On Debt Ceiling Plan

Originally published on Mon August 1, 2011 8:30 pm

The House is voting on the debt ceiling plan brokered by the White House and congressional leaders. Melissa Block talks to NPR's Andrea Seabrook and David Welna for the state of play.

4:54pm

Mon August 1, 2011
Economy

Ellison Offers Progressive View Of Debt Deal

Many members of the Congressional Progressive Caucus — the liberal wing of the Democratic Party in the House — are furious about the deal that the president has made with Republicans to get an increase in the debt ceiling. Melissa Block talks with Rep. Keith Ellison, a Democrat representing Minnesota's 5th Congressional District. Ellison is also the co-chair of the Congressional Progressive Caucus.

4:52pm

Mon August 1, 2011
Politics

FAA Debate Puts Subsidized Rural Airports At Risk

Construction crews at a new air traffic control tower at Oakland International Airport were told on July 19 to stop working after the U.S. House refused to reauthorize routine funding of the Federal Aviation Administration.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Construction projects at airports around the country have stopped and 4,000 employees of the Federal Aviation Administration are furloughed, all because Congress couldn't agree on an extension of the agency's authority to operate.

Democratic Sen. Jay Rockefeller, who chairs the subcommittee that oversees the FAA, indicates he will offer a plan as soon as Monday night to end the shutdown. Rockefeller's plan includes cuts in air service subsidies to some rural communities.

Those subsidies keep commercial aviation service in rural areas that would otherwise be isolated.

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4:25pm

Mon August 1, 2011
From Our Listeners

Summer Sounds: Shakespeare

Oklahoma theater writer Larry Laneer contributes his Summer Sound to our series. He says when he thinks of the season, his thoughts turn to outdoor performances of the Bard's plays.

4:59pm

Sat July 30, 2011
Fine Art

The Theft That Made The 'Mona Lisa' A Masterpiece

A New York Times headline from August 11, 1911, reported the investigation into the disappearance of the "Mona Lisa."
The New York Times

If you were standing outside the Louvre in Paris on the morning of Aug. 21, 1911, you might have noticed three men hurrying out of the museum.

They would have been pretty conspicuous on a quiet Monday morning, writer and historian James Zug tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz. "Sunday night was a big social night in Paris," he says, "so a lot of people were hung over on Monday morning."

The men, three Italian handymen, were not hungover. But they might have been a little tired. They'd just spent the night in an art-supply closet.

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4:24pm

Sat July 30, 2011
Books

Bulgarian Writer Finds His Voice In English

Want to find the perfect gift for your Communist grandfather in Bulgaria? Author Miroslav Penkov suggests you try eBay. That's where the protagonist of his story "Buying Lenin" finds the Soviet founder's preserved body and buys it for his beloved grandfather back home.

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2:58pm

Sat July 30, 2011
Author Interviews

'Starman' Tracks David Bowie's Ch-Ch-Ch-Changes

The man we know as David Bowie has gone by many names: David Jones, the Thin White Duke and Ziggy Stardust, to name a few. But whether he's dressed in a metallic leather jumpsuit or a button-up and tie, David Bowie has dominated pop music.

Paul Trynka, former editor of the music magazine MOJO has chronicled the story of the man who influenced pop stars such as Lady Gaga and Madonna in his new book, David Bowie: Starman.

Meet David Jones

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6:57pm

Fri July 29, 2011
Economy

House Poised To Vote On Debt Bill

Robert Siegel talks to NPR's David Welna live on Capitol Hill. Welna discusses what's happening with Speaker John Boehner's debt ceiling plan in the House.

6:55pm

Fri July 29, 2011
Economy

House Passes Debt Bill

The House passed Republican Speaker John Boehner's debt ceiling bill. Robert Siegel talks to NPR's Ron Elving for more.

3:25pm

Fri July 29, 2011
Spotlight on Country

Ashton Shepherd: Country Music With Roots

Ashton Shepherd, whose new album is called Where Country Grows.
Danny Clinch Courtesy of MCA Nashville

In these days of downright citified, even glamorous, country music singers, Ashton Shepherd lives the life other country stars just sing about. Her new album, Where Country Grows, is her second, but Shepherd hasn't moved to a big spread outside Nashville. She still lives in Coffeeville, Ala. She sells vegetables out of the back of her pickup truck when she's not on tour.

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3:00pm

Fri July 29, 2011
NPR Story

No Resolution To Debt Ceiling Crisis In Sight

House Republicans huddle behind closed doors seeking votes for Speaker John Boehner's debt ceiling bill, while Senate Democrats move ahead on their own plan, which faces lumbering procedural hurdles. The irony, says President Obama, is that "the two parties are not miles apart." He adds that "the time for putting party first is over."

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