All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-7pm and Weekends 5-6PM
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Jonese Franklin

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

Genre: 

Pages

4:25pm

Mon August 1, 2011
From Our Listeners

Summer Sounds: Shakespeare

Oklahoma theater writer Larry Laneer contributes his Summer Sound to our series. He says when he thinks of the season, his thoughts turn to outdoor performances of the Bard's plays.

4:59pm

Sat July 30, 2011
Fine Art

The Theft That Made The 'Mona Lisa' A Masterpiece

A New York Times headline from August 11, 1911, reported the investigation into the disappearance of the "Mona Lisa."
The New York Times

If you were standing outside the Louvre in Paris on the morning of Aug. 21, 1911, you might have noticed three men hurrying out of the museum.

They would have been pretty conspicuous on a quiet Monday morning, writer and historian James Zug tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz. "Sunday night was a big social night in Paris," he says, "so a lot of people were hung over on Monday morning."

The men, three Italian handymen, were not hungover. But they might have been a little tired. They'd just spent the night in an art-supply closet.

Read more

4:24pm

Sat July 30, 2011
Books

Bulgarian Writer Finds His Voice In English

Want to find the perfect gift for your Communist grandfather in Bulgaria? Author Miroslav Penkov suggests you try eBay. That's where the protagonist of his story "Buying Lenin" finds the Soviet founder's preserved body and buys it for his beloved grandfather back home.

Read more

2:58pm

Sat July 30, 2011
Author Interviews

'Starman' Tracks David Bowie's Ch-Ch-Ch-Changes

The man we know as David Bowie has gone by many names: David Jones, the Thin White Duke and Ziggy Stardust, to name a few. But whether he's dressed in a metallic leather jumpsuit or a button-up and tie, David Bowie has dominated pop music.

Paul Trynka, former editor of the music magazine MOJO has chronicled the story of the man who influenced pop stars such as Lady Gaga and Madonna in his new book, David Bowie: Starman.

Meet David Jones

Read more

6:57pm

Fri July 29, 2011
Economy

House Poised To Vote On Debt Bill

Robert Siegel talks to NPR's David Welna live on Capitol Hill. Welna discusses what's happening with Speaker John Boehner's debt ceiling plan in the House.

6:55pm

Fri July 29, 2011
Economy

House Passes Debt Bill

The House passed Republican Speaker John Boehner's debt ceiling bill. Robert Siegel talks to NPR's Ron Elving for more.

3:25pm

Fri July 29, 2011
Spotlight on Country

Ashton Shepherd: Country Music With Roots

Ashton Shepherd, whose new album is called Where Country Grows.
Danny Clinch Courtesy of MCA Nashville

In these days of downright citified, even glamorous, country music singers, Ashton Shepherd lives the life other country stars just sing about. Her new album, Where Country Grows, is her second, but Shepherd hasn't moved to a big spread outside Nashville. She still lives in Coffeeville, Ala. She sells vegetables out of the back of her pickup truck when she's not on tour.

Read more

3:00pm

Fri July 29, 2011
NPR Story

No Resolution To Debt Ceiling Crisis In Sight

House Republicans huddle behind closed doors seeking votes for Speaker John Boehner's debt ceiling bill, while Senate Democrats move ahead on their own plan, which faces lumbering procedural hurdles. The irony, says President Obama, is that "the two parties are not miles apart." He adds that "the time for putting party first is over."

2:06pm

Fri July 29, 2011
Music

Songs For The Delivery Room: One Woman's Playlist

Alison MacAdam with her son, Abe, about eight months after she put this mix to use.
Courtesy of the MacAdam family

Pregnant? Making a mixtape to accompany your labor is not likely your first consideration. It certainly wasn't mine back in the snowy winter of 2010. But many hospitals and birth centers promise you CD players or even iPod docks in the delivery room. Medical professionals encourage you to bring music to help you bear the experience.

Read more

11:45am

Fri July 29, 2011
NPR Story

After Debt Vote Delay, What's Next?

NPR's David Welna talks to Robert Siegel about what could happen in the Senate given the delay taking place in the House.

8:08pm

Thu July 28, 2011
Around the Nation

Military Spouses Face Especially Grim Job Prospects

Stephanie Davis, shown with her husband, 2nd Lt. Charles Davis, says even though she's a special education teacher with two master's degrees, she's had trouble finding a job near Fort Hood in Texas.
Courtesy of Stephanie Davis

Second in a three-part series

In this economy, who in their right mind would quit their job and move to a new city where they don't have any contacts? That's exactly what thousands of military spouses do each year. They don't have a choice.

Stephanie Davis thought she had picked a field that would be portable: teaching.

"And I really loved it," says Davis. "I was at a great school, great district."

That is, until last year when her husband, 2nd Lt. Charles Davis, an Army officer, got orders to transfer to Fort Hood in Texas.

Read more

5:00pm

Thu July 28, 2011
Movie Reviews

A Frantic, Nonstop Chase At 'Point Blank' Range

En Pointe: Nurse-trainee Samuel (Gilles Lellouche) is on the run for much of Point Blank, which finds him outmaneuvering (and eventually succumbing to) bad guys as a consequence of saving a mysterious man's life.
Magnolia Pictures

Mid-summer is a time when movie audiences crave action. And that's no truer of the multiplex than it is at the art house, where Point Blank, a new thriller from France (no relation to the Lee Marvin/John Boorman crime picture from 1967) opens — quite literally — with a bang. It's the crash of a man who, clutching his bleeding stomach, smashes through a door into the wall of a metal staircase. And it's followed by another crash seconds later, when two men with guns smash through the door after him.

Read more

4:56pm

Thu July 28, 2011
National Security

Army: AWOL Soldier Was Planning Fort Hood Attack

Robert Siegel talks with reporter Matt Largey of member station KUT about the arrest of an AWOL Army private named Naser Jason Abdo for threatening a terrorist attack on Fort Hood in Texas.

3:10pm

Thu July 28, 2011
Music Interviews

They Might Be Giants: Still 'Emotionally Arrested' At 50

They Might Be Giants.
Shervin Lainez

They Might Be Giants' members have been making quirky, smart — some say geeky — pop songs since the early '80s. They found early success with songs like "Birdhouse in Your Soul" and a cover of the novelty tune "Istanbul (Not Constantinople)." More recently, the group has been writing children's songs.

Read more

5:51pm

Wed July 27, 2011
Music Reviews

Matana Roberts: An Ancestral History In Music

Matana Roberts' new recording, COIN COIN Chapter One: Gens De Colour Libre, joins Live In London as her second album released in 2011.
Brett Walker Courtesy of the artist

Matana Roberts grew up in Chicago hearing stories about her extended family, from its roots in Louisiana and Mississippi to its participation in the Great Migration north early in the 20th century. The stories caused her to develop a deep love of history and a desire to somehow turn that into music.

Read more

4:53pm

Wed July 27, 2011
Global Health

Egalite For Bebe? France's Free Child Clinics At Risk

Dr. Sandrine Courtial examines 3.5-month-old Ayline Alhas at the Centre de Protection Maternelle et Infantile (PMI) in Savigny-sur-Orge, France, before giving her a vaccination. Ayline's mother, Melissa, has been bringing her in for free well-child check-ups since her birth.
Olivier Pascaud Olivier Pascaud for NPR

Imagine if in nearly every town in America, there was a public health clinic that offered completely free services for parents and young kids. Whether you were rich or poor, you could drop in without an appointment for a check up, vaccination or to ask the questions that plague new parents. The clinics would focus entirely on keeping you and your children healthy.

Read more

3:12pm

Wed July 27, 2011
Around the Nation

Home-Buying Regrets: Two Military Families' Sagas

Sarah Bullard with her four children, Liam, Fay, Olivia and Joshua.
Bradley Campbell WRNI

First of a three-part series

It's lunchtime, and Sarah Bullard and her four kids gather around the island in the kitchen of their Bristol, R.I., home. Her husband, a Navy officer, is out of town.

This kitchen is what sold her on the house on a snowy December day.

"We walked through, and it was a cluttered mess," Bullard says. "And we sort of looked at each other and walked through into the kitchen, and my husband looked at me and was like, 'Uh-oh. This is it. It's a beautiful kitchen.' "

Read more

8:00am

Wed July 27, 2011
Critics' Lists: Summer 2011

They Came, They Saw, They Cooked: 5 Food Memoirs

Chris Silas Neal

During summer vacation, part of me wants to spend my hard-earned sheckles traveling the world and eating amazing food. The other part of me just wants to lie on the couch with a good book. Now, thanks to five delicious new food memoirs, I can do both.

The books — written by a reluctant, bad-girl chef; an avant-garde restaurateur; a slacker with a love of roast chicken; a Mideast war correspondent; and an American in Paris — are about love affairs with food, and the journeys that led their authors into the kitchen.

Read more

5:30pm

Tue July 26, 2011
Deceptive Cadence

A Tradition Shattered: Israelis Play Wagner At Bayreuth

Roberto Paternostro, the music director of the Israel Chamber Orchestra.
Israel Chamber Orchestra

Like all of Richard Wagner's music, performances of his piece Siegfried Idyll, is unofficially — but effectively — banned in Israel.

It's not just that Wagner was an anti-Semite. He wrote a notorious essay called "Jewishness in Music." And after his death, Wagner's family was close to Adolph Hitler. Hitler often the attended the annual Bayreuth Festival, which is devoted to Wagner's music.

Read more

3:00pm

Tue July 26, 2011
NPR Story

Rep. Wu Resigns In The Midst Of Sex Assault Allegations

Democratic Rep. David Wu of Oregon has announced that he is resigning from Congress. Recent allegations of sexual assault and abuse of prescription drugs have led to questions over whether he is fit for public office.

3:00pm

Tue July 26, 2011
NPR Story

Seniors Complete To Be 'Miss Alabama Nursing Home'

Monday in Birmingham, 75 contestants from the "retirement set" went toe to toe for the title of "Miss Alabama Nursing Home."

3:00pm

Tue July 26, 2011
NPR Story

White House Official Discusses Debt Ceiling Talks

Michele Norris speaks with Gene Sperling, director of the National Economic Council and assistant to the president for economic policy. They talk about the latest developments in the debt ceiling negotiations.

3:00pm

Tue July 26, 2011
NPR Story

Egyptians At Odds Over Military's Role In Government

When the military stepped in and eased the way out for Hosni Mubarak earlier this year, its leaders insisted they only wanted to be a caretaker government, finding the best pathway to civilian and democratic rule. A new electoral law has been promulgated, and it looks like parliamentary elections will be held in November. Some in the military want the army to continue to play the role of safeguard for the new system that is emerging. But others — primarily the young — argue the military cannot be trusted with that kind of power.

3:00pm

Tue July 26, 2011
Economy

Can Boehner's Debt Ceiling Plan Pass?

Speaker John Boehner's plan for raising the debt ceiling in two steps and cutting the budget comes to the House floor Wednesday. Does he have the votes to pass it? Then what?

5:44pm

Mon July 25, 2011
Music Reviews

Teddybears: Enigmatic Troublemakers

Teddybears.
Chrissy Piper Courtesy of the artist

The Stockholm production trio Teddybears aren't really a band as that term is usually employed. They rarely play live and prefer to hire more personable performers to front their tracks. In the past, they've been known for mild, electronically treated vocals on mild, electronically treated dance songs. But on their newly released album, Devil's Music, they like things much livelier.

Read more

3:42pm

Mon July 25, 2011
Pop Culture

To Close Comic-Con, One Spacecraft To Rule Them All

Football fans have the Super Bowl. Soccer fans have The World Cup. Sci-fi geeks have Starship Smackdown.

Everything you need to know about the event is in the name, says panelist Mark A. Altman, creator of the Cinemax show Femme Fatales: "'Starship Smackdown' says it all."

Read more

3:00pm

Mon July 25, 2011
NPR Story

NFL Players Reps Approve Collective Bargaining Agreement

Representatives of NFL players voted Monday to accept a new collective bargaining agreement with the league. That means training camps will open later this week — and a mad scramble for free agents and trades begins.

3:00pm

Mon July 25, 2011
NPR Story

An Asylum-Seeker Stretches The Truth For A Better Life

Robert Siegel interviews writer Suketu Mehta, about his recent article in The New Yorker magazine called "The Asylum Seeker." Mehta follows Caroline, an African immigrant who applies for asylum in the United States. She embellishes her story, saying she had been raped in her home country to make her request for asylum more compelling.

2:53pm

Mon July 25, 2011
Culture And Traditions

Circumcision: Age-Old Rite Faces Modern Concerns

Ross and Susanna 2
Barbara Bradley Hagerty NPR

For many couples, having a baby is a spiritual experience. For Jews, there's another, religious, element that is intrinsic to the Jewish identity. Nearly all Jewish parents have their baby boys circumcised, as commanded by God in the Bible. And yet, for some Jewish couples, whether to circumcise or not is becoming an agonizing decision.

Read more

4:02pm

Sun July 24, 2011
Author Interviews

Yo, Bro! Belly Up To The Bar And Recite 'Broetry'

Bros like beer and sports. But poetry?
istockphoto

"Broetry is poetry for dudes," Brian McGackin writes in the introduction to his new collection of poems. "It's poetry for people who don't like poetry."

The slim volume draws inspiration from non-broets, McGackin tells Guy Raz, host of weekends on All Things Considered. Even the cover poem mirrors the famous William Carlos Williams work "This is Just to Say;" which Williams wrote as a sort-of refrigerator note to his spouse, apologizing for eating plums left in their icebox.

Read more

Pages