All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-7pm and Weekends 5-6PM
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Jonese Franklin

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

Genre: 

Pages

3:00pm

Sat August 20, 2011
NPR Story

Rebels Close In On Libyan Capital

Rebel forces in Libya captured the key tactical city of Zawiyah on Saturday and fighting has reportedly broken out in the capital city of Tripoli. Host Laura Sullivan speaks with NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro from Zawiyah as the rebels close in on Col. Moammar Gadhafi.

12:00pm

Sat August 20, 2011
Music Interviews

Grey Reverend: Bedroom Ballads, Spare By Necessity

Grey Reverend's debut full-length is called Of The Days.
Courtesy of the artist

Larry "L.D." Brown, an acoustic songwriter who performs as Grey Reverend, suffers from one of the worst ailments a guitarist can have. Some years ago, he discovered he had focal dystonia, a neurological condition that causes muscles to constrict involuntarily, and which eventually caused Brown to lose the use of his left ring and pinky fingers.

Read more

5:23pm

Fri August 19, 2011
Music Interviews

Amy LaVere: Shaking Heartbreak

Amy LaVere's new album is called Stranger Me.
Courtesy of the artist

In 2009, it was a difficult year for singer-songwriter Amy LaVere: Her producer died, her guitarist quit, and she split up with longtime boyfriend Paul Tyler, who had also been her drummer. LaVere poured her emotion into her writing, and the album that resulted was this year's Stranger Me.

"I went into this [album] probably with more insecurity than I have ever had," LaVere tells NPR's Laura Sullivan. "Just even the title of the record, Stranger Me, is me saying I don't really know who I am in this."

Read more

5:08pm

Fri August 19, 2011
Jazz

The Healing Power Of Blues Dancing

A couple dances at the Polish Club in San Francisco, which hosts a night of blues dancing every Monday.
Alexis Estrada

Blues was once called the devil's music, but for many, it has transformative, healing power. Every Monday night in San Francisco's Mission District, devout blues followers descend upon the Polish Club for a night of dancing in an unconventional style.

Blues dancing, which requires participants to appear to be in love with their dancing partners — including strangers — has helped some at the Polish Club to turn their lives around. Click the link at the top of the page to hear the story of three dancers who say they've felt changed by power of the blues.

Read more

4:31pm

Fri August 19, 2011
Commentary

Summer Sounds: Panting

Commentator Andrei Codrescu adds to our arsenal of Summer Sounds with an essay about the panting of his two dogs. They have very different personalities, but share the panting gene.

3:00pm

Fri August 19, 2011
NPR Story

In Verizon Workers Strike, Negotiations Continue

About 45,000 Verizon workers stayed out on strike for a second week. Negotiations continue, but the company and the union are standing by their original positions: Verizon wants workers in its traditional phone company business to pay for more of their health benefits.

3:00pm

Fri August 19, 2011
NPR Story

West Memphis Three Set Free

In Arkansas Friday, three men convicted of killing several young Cub Scouts and dumping their bodies in a ditch changed their pleas. It resolves a years-long effort to win their freedom after evidence showed they didn't commit the crimes.

3:00pm

Fri August 19, 2011
Asia

Activist Fasts To Fight Indian Corruption

In India, anti-corruption activist Anna Hazare has struck a chord with tens of thousands of his countrymen fed up with government malfeasance. He has been fasting and campaigning for a strict anti-corruption law, much stronger than the one the government has proposed. The law would allow for prosecution at all levels, including the prime minister and the judiciary. Government efforts to negotiate with Hazare broke down, and he was arrested earlier this week. That in turn sparked large protests outside the jail where he was being held.

Read more

2:13pm

Fri August 19, 2011
Opinion

After Miscarriage, Missing The Luxury Of Grieving

iStockphoto.com

Ken Harbaugh is a former Navy pilot and an NPR commentator.

It has been three months since the miscarriage. We weren't far along, still in the first trimester, so only our closest friends knew we were expecting.

Annmarie, my wife, is fine. At least, her body is fine. There is something broken in both of us, though.

Read more

4:24pm

Thu August 18, 2011
Food

Sweet Lessons From A South Carolina Peach Professor

Is It Ripe? "To pick a perfect peach, obviously you need to pick it off the tree yourself," says Clemson University peach specialist Desmond Layne. But for those of us who pick peaches in supermarkets and not in orchards, he has three simple suggestions: Smell it. Squeeze it. Look at where it's from.
iStockphoto.com

Desmond Layne may just have the best job in America. He's a peach specialist at Clemson University in South Carolina — and a fruit video star. Layne posts weekly videos from out in the orchard, where he samples his peach pick of the week.

Read more

3:58pm

Thu August 18, 2011
Movies

On Location: The Frozen Ozarks Of 'Winter's Bone'

Jennifer Lawrence, as Ree Dolly in Winter's Bone, on the front porch of Frank Layson's house in southwestern Missouri. Layson's hand-built house served as the home for the Dolly children in the film.
Sebastian Mlynarski Roadside Attractions

Set in the Ozarks, in a small community where illegal methamphetamine trade flourishes in a devastated economy, Winter's Bone follows the travails of Ree Dolly, a 17-year-old girl who spends the length of the film trudging through the bleak chill of southwestern Missouri in its darkest season, with the trees black spikes and hills bleached silver and rust. Ree's father, a meth cooker, has gone missing while out on bail, but not before putting the house his three children live in up as collateral against his bond.

Read more

5:40pm

Wed August 17, 2011
The Record

Who Is Inspecting Outdoor Stages?

The stage collapses at the Indiana State Fair in Indianapolis on Aug. 13. The stage fell just before country duo Sugarland were scheduled to perform, killing at least four people and injuring as many as 40.
Joey Foley Getty Images

Investigators are looking for clues about what led to the tragic collapse of an outdoor concert stage at the Indiana State Fair. Five people were killed on Saturday when a 60-mph gust of wind blew the roof and metal scaffolding onto a crowd that was waiting for the band Sugarland to start playing.

Read more

4:34pm

Wed August 17, 2011
Law

In Top Court, Anticipated Health Law Review Raises Ethics Questions

In the coming term — the Supreme Court is expected to review President Obama's health care law. With that in mind, some interest groups are raising questions about the Court's ethics rules that govern when a justice should be disqualified from a case. Should Justice Clarence Thomas have to recuse himself because his wife has actively and publicly opposed the health care law? Or, should Justice Elena Kagan disqualify herself because she was a top legal official in the Obama administration when the law was enacted?

3:18pm

Wed August 17, 2011
Music Reviews

Four Decades Later, Country Artists Return To 'Fox Hollow'

Tom T. Hall (third from left) poses with some of the collaborators who helped remake Songs of Fox Hollow, including co-producers Eric Brace (third from right) and Peter Cooper (second from right).
Courtesy of the artist

While a lot of rock musicians have recorded music for families recently, far fewer country musicians have done so. But a new release pays tribute to a Nashville kids' record that's nearly 40 years old.

In 1974, the children's album Songs of Fox Hollow by Tom T. Hall charted at No. 3 — not on the kids' music charts, but on the Billboard Top Country Albums chart. Hall drew inspiration from his farm, penning lyrics about baby ducks, one-legged chickens, and root-beer-drinking snakes, with a gentleness that calmed and reassured little kids.

Read more

4:11pm

Tue August 16, 2011
Planet Money

Hackers' Low-Tech Tool: A Phone Call

Willy D. Flickr

The conference for the best hackers in the free world is held every year in Las Vegas. It's called DefCon. The entrance fee is $150, cash only. (And it's a bad idea to use the ATM at a hacker conference.)

There are lots of hacking competitions at DefCon, most of which are complicated and technical. But one contest is very simple.

Read more

3:37pm

Tue August 16, 2011
Three Books...

3 Antagonizing Protagonists You'll Love To Hate

iStockphoto.com

People often talk about the characters in books as if they were considering who to invite to a dinner party. "Oh, I just hated her — she was so mean." "He's a bully; I didn't like how he treated his mother." There's something to be said for a likable character, but fiction has a way of upending our ordinary standards. In life we like tranquility; in books we love tension. And in these three books you'll find protagonists who you'd hate to meet — you'd change train cars to get away from any of them — but who you'll love on the page.

Read more

3:00pm

Tue August 16, 2011
NPR Story

Book Review: 'Disaster Was My God'

Alan Cheuse reviews a novel based on the real life of the French poet Arthur Rimbaud, called Disaster Was My God.

3:00pm

Mon August 15, 2011
NPR Story

Obama Kicks Off Midwestern Bus Tour

President Obama started a three-day bus tour of the Midwest in Minnesota Monday. At a town hall meeting in Cannon Falls, Minn., he talked about jobs and the economy.

3:00pm

Mon August 15, 2011
NPR Story

Turkey Warns Syria's President

The Syrian government has started deploying the navy in their attack on rebels in the port city of Latakia. Neighboring Turkey is warning Damascus that the bloodshed must stop. Robert Siegel speaks with New York Times correspondent Anthony Shadid about recent developments.

3:00pm

Mon August 15, 2011
World

Mubarak Makes Second Court Appearance

In Egypt Monday, former President Hosni Mubarak made his second appearance in court. And much like his first appearance earlier this month, the day proved more dramatic than substantive. The judge once again delayed any testimony against the former president. Mubarak is charged with complicity in the deaths of hundreds of protesters earlier this year — and with corruption. His two sons are also on trial.

3:00pm

Mon August 15, 2011
Middle East

Yemeni Protest Movement Darling Frustrated By Pace Of Change

Tawakkol Karman is the darling of the protest movement in Yemen. A longtime human rights activist and defender of the freedom of expression, she was a natural choice as a leader of a student movement that quickly grew into a nationwide revolution to remove Yemeni president Ali Abdullah Saleh from power. But now, six months on, Saleh is still clinging to power, divisions are forming among the opposition, and pockets of the country are turning violent. Karman hasn't lost her resolve, but she admits she's frustrated by the grinding pace of change.

5:58pm

Sun August 14, 2011
Sports

At Last, Football Faces Concussion Problems Head-On

Green Bay Packers Quarterback Matt Flynn goes down hard during a preseason game vs. the Cleveland Browns on August 13. (Photo by Jason Miller/Getty Images)
Jason Miller Getty Images

The NFL got back to the playing field this past week for its first preseason games since the players and owners agreed to a new collective bargaining agreement. But the scene at NFL training camps is a bit different this year.

New rules now limit the amount of full-contact practice that players can participate in. Gone are the grueling summer two-a-days.

Read more

3:24pm

Sun August 14, 2011
Author Interviews

Comic Books' Secret Identity Revealed In 'Supergods'

Action Comics #1, published on April 18, 1938, featured the first appearance of Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster's Superman.
Courtesy of DC Comics

For comic book fans, writer Grant Morrison is something like a god. He's worked for both DC and Marvel comics, writing stories for Superman, Batman and other heroes. In his new book, Supergods, he discusses what comic books can tell us about being human.

Growing up in Glasgow, Scotland, Morrison says his love of American comic books was regarded as slightly suspect.

Read more

3:00pm

Sun August 14, 2011
NPR Story

After Iowa, GOP Field Gets Reshuffled

Tim Pawlenty's out, Rick Perry's in, and Ron Paul's up, but not as high as Iowa straw poll winner Michele Bachman. And where the heck is Mitt Romney? NPR political editor Ron Elving reveals all to guest host David Greene.

1:52pm

Sun August 14, 2011
Arts & Life

New Poet Laureate Philip Levine's 'Absolute Truth'

On Wednesday, the Library of Congress announced that Philip Levine would be the next poet laureate of the United States.
Geoffrey Berliner

"The truth of poetry is not the truth of history," says Philip Levine, the newly-named poet laureate of the United States.

Levine is 83 years old. He grew up in Detroit, working at automobile factories in his youth, and published his first book of poetry in 1963, at the age of 38.

He went on to win the 1991 National Book Award for his collection What Work Is, and the 1995 Pulitzer Prize for poetry for The Simple Truth. His appointment was announced by the Library of Congress on Wednesday.

Read more

9:52am

Sun August 14, 2011
Music Interviews

The Bottle Rockets: Heartland Tales Of Heartbreak

Brian Henneman and his band, The Bottle Rockets, explore their quiet side on a all-acoustic album.
Eric Sheppard Courtesy of the artist

The Midwestern country-rock ensemble The Bottle Rockets have been playing together for close to 20 years. Along the way, they selected an audacious nickname for themselves — "The Best Band on the Planet" — which they've worked hard to live up to ever since. Frontman Brian Henneman says he prefers that name to the one some fans have settled on: "America's Greatest Bar Band."

Read more

4:45pm

Sat August 13, 2011
Remembrances

The Chaos And Comedy Of Mexico's Cantinflas

Mexican Comedian Mario Moreno also known Cantinflas is seen in an undated photo in Mexico. (AP Photo/Proceso)
Archivo Proceso ASSOCIATED PRESS

Last Friday would have been the 100th birthday of the Mexican comic legend Cantinflas. By the time of his death in 1993, Cantinflas had acted in 50 films, won a Golden Globe, and even inspired a new Spanish verb — cantinflear — in honor of his ability to play with the sounds of Spanish for comedic effect

Read more

4:20pm

Sat August 13, 2011
Movies

Aziz Ansari: From Business School to Hollywood

Colin Patrick Smith

When the creators of NBC's hit sitcom The Office approached Aziz Ansari about a new mockumentary style sitcom, Ansari said yes. Thing is, the then 25-year old stand up comedian had no clue what the show was going to be about.

Now three years later, the show that was a mystery to Ansari is a hit. It's called Parks and Recreation and Ansari plays the scene-stealing character Tom Haverford.

Read more

3:00pm

Sat August 13, 2011
NPR Story

Iowans Pick GOP Favorites In Straw Poll

NPR's Don Gonyea is in Iowa reporting on the Republican straw poll.

3:00pm

Sat August 13, 2011
NPR Story

World Leaders Call For End To Syrian Violence

Syrian president Bashar Assad continues violent repression of anti--government demonstrators. Guest host David Greene speaks with NPR's Kelly McEvers about the situation in Syria.

Pages