All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-7pm and Weekends 5-6PM
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Jonese Franklin

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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4:34pm

Wed August 17, 2011
Law

In Top Court, Anticipated Health Law Review Raises Ethics Questions

In the coming term — the Supreme Court is expected to review President Obama's health care law. With that in mind, some interest groups are raising questions about the Court's ethics rules that govern when a justice should be disqualified from a case. Should Justice Clarence Thomas have to recuse himself because his wife has actively and publicly opposed the health care law? Or, should Justice Elena Kagan disqualify herself because she was a top legal official in the Obama administration when the law was enacted?

3:18pm

Wed August 17, 2011
Music Reviews

Four Decades Later, Country Artists Return To 'Fox Hollow'

Tom T. Hall (third from left) poses with some of the collaborators who helped remake Songs of Fox Hollow, including co-producers Eric Brace (third from right) and Peter Cooper (second from right).
Courtesy of the artist

While a lot of rock musicians have recorded music for families recently, far fewer country musicians have done so. But a new release pays tribute to a Nashville kids' record that's nearly 40 years old.

In 1974, the children's album Songs of Fox Hollow by Tom T. Hall charted at No. 3 — not on the kids' music charts, but on the Billboard Top Country Albums chart. Hall drew inspiration from his farm, penning lyrics about baby ducks, one-legged chickens, and root-beer-drinking snakes, with a gentleness that calmed and reassured little kids.

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4:11pm

Tue August 16, 2011
Planet Money

Hackers' Low-Tech Tool: A Phone Call

Willy D. Flickr

The conference for the best hackers in the free world is held every year in Las Vegas. It's called DefCon. The entrance fee is $150, cash only. (And it's a bad idea to use the ATM at a hacker conference.)

There are lots of hacking competitions at DefCon, most of which are complicated and technical. But one contest is very simple.

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3:37pm

Tue August 16, 2011
Three Books...

3 Antagonizing Protagonists You'll Love To Hate

iStockphoto.com

People often talk about the characters in books as if they were considering who to invite to a dinner party. "Oh, I just hated her — she was so mean." "He's a bully; I didn't like how he treated his mother." There's something to be said for a likable character, but fiction has a way of upending our ordinary standards. In life we like tranquility; in books we love tension. And in these three books you'll find protagonists who you'd hate to meet — you'd change train cars to get away from any of them — but who you'll love on the page.

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3:00pm

Tue August 16, 2011
NPR Story

Book Review: 'Disaster Was My God'

Alan Cheuse reviews a novel based on the real life of the French poet Arthur Rimbaud, called Disaster Was My God.

3:00pm

Mon August 15, 2011
Middle East

Yemeni Protest Movement Darling Frustrated By Pace Of Change

Tawakkol Karman is the darling of the protest movement in Yemen. A longtime human rights activist and defender of the freedom of expression, she was a natural choice as a leader of a student movement that quickly grew into a nationwide revolution to remove Yemeni president Ali Abdullah Saleh from power. But now, six months on, Saleh is still clinging to power, divisions are forming among the opposition, and pockets of the country are turning violent. Karman hasn't lost her resolve, but she admits she's frustrated by the grinding pace of change.

3:00pm

Mon August 15, 2011
NPR Story

Obama Kicks Off Midwestern Bus Tour

President Obama started a three-day bus tour of the Midwest in Minnesota Monday. At a town hall meeting in Cannon Falls, Minn., he talked about jobs and the economy.

3:00pm

Mon August 15, 2011
NPR Story

Turkey Warns Syria's President

The Syrian government has started deploying the navy in their attack on rebels in the port city of Latakia. Neighboring Turkey is warning Damascus that the bloodshed must stop. Robert Siegel speaks with New York Times correspondent Anthony Shadid about recent developments.

3:00pm

Mon August 15, 2011
World

Mubarak Makes Second Court Appearance

In Egypt Monday, former President Hosni Mubarak made his second appearance in court. And much like his first appearance earlier this month, the day proved more dramatic than substantive. The judge once again delayed any testimony against the former president. Mubarak is charged with complicity in the deaths of hundreds of protesters earlier this year — and with corruption. His two sons are also on trial.

5:58pm

Sun August 14, 2011
Sports

At Last, Football Faces Concussion Problems Head-On

Green Bay Packers Quarterback Matt Flynn goes down hard during a preseason game vs. the Cleveland Browns on August 13. (Photo by Jason Miller/Getty Images)
Jason Miller Getty Images

The NFL got back to the playing field this past week for its first preseason games since the players and owners agreed to a new collective bargaining agreement. But the scene at NFL training camps is a bit different this year.

New rules now limit the amount of full-contact practice that players can participate in. Gone are the grueling summer two-a-days.

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3:24pm

Sun August 14, 2011
Author Interviews

Comic Books' Secret Identity Revealed In 'Supergods'

Action Comics #1, published on April 18, 1938, featured the first appearance of Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster's Superman.
Courtesy of DC Comics

For comic book fans, writer Grant Morrison is something like a god. He's worked for both DC and Marvel comics, writing stories for Superman, Batman and other heroes. In his new book, Supergods, he discusses what comic books can tell us about being human.

Growing up in Glasgow, Scotland, Morrison says his love of American comic books was regarded as slightly suspect.

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3:00pm

Sun August 14, 2011
NPR Story

After Iowa, GOP Field Gets Reshuffled

Tim Pawlenty's out, Rick Perry's in, and Ron Paul's up, but not as high as Iowa straw poll winner Michele Bachman. And where the heck is Mitt Romney? NPR political editor Ron Elving reveals all to guest host David Greene.

1:52pm

Sun August 14, 2011
Arts & Life

New Poet Laureate Philip Levine's 'Absolute Truth'

On Wednesday, the Library of Congress announced that Philip Levine would be the next poet laureate of the United States.
Geoffrey Berliner

"The truth of poetry is not the truth of history," says Philip Levine, the newly-named poet laureate of the United States.

Levine is 83 years old. He grew up in Detroit, working at automobile factories in his youth, and published his first book of poetry in 1963, at the age of 38.

He went on to win the 1991 National Book Award for his collection What Work Is, and the 1995 Pulitzer Prize for poetry for The Simple Truth. His appointment was announced by the Library of Congress on Wednesday.

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9:52am

Sun August 14, 2011
Music Interviews

The Bottle Rockets: Heartland Tales Of Heartbreak

Brian Henneman and his band, The Bottle Rockets, explore their quiet side on a all-acoustic album.
Eric Sheppard Courtesy of the artist

The Midwestern country-rock ensemble The Bottle Rockets have been playing together for close to 20 years. Along the way, they selected an audacious nickname for themselves — "The Best Band on the Planet" — which they've worked hard to live up to ever since. Frontman Brian Henneman says he prefers that name to the one some fans have settled on: "America's Greatest Bar Band."

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4:45pm

Sat August 13, 2011
Remembrances

The Chaos And Comedy Of Mexico's Cantinflas

Mexican Comedian Mario Moreno also known Cantinflas is seen in an undated photo in Mexico. (AP Photo/Proceso)
Archivo Proceso ASSOCIATED PRESS

Last Friday would have been the 100th birthday of the Mexican comic legend Cantinflas. By the time of his death in 1993, Cantinflas had acted in 50 films, won a Golden Globe, and even inspired a new Spanish verb — cantinflear — in honor of his ability to play with the sounds of Spanish for comedic effect

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4:20pm

Sat August 13, 2011
Movies

Aziz Ansari: From Business School to Hollywood

Colin Patrick Smith

When the creators of NBC's hit sitcom The Office approached Aziz Ansari about a new mockumentary style sitcom, Ansari said yes. Thing is, the then 25-year old stand up comedian had no clue what the show was going to be about.

Now three years later, the show that was a mystery to Ansari is a hit. It's called Parks and Recreation and Ansari plays the scene-stealing character Tom Haverford.

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3:00pm

Sat August 13, 2011
NPR Story

Iowans Pick GOP Favorites In Straw Poll

NPR's Don Gonyea is in Iowa reporting on the Republican straw poll.

3:00pm

Sat August 13, 2011
NPR Story

World Leaders Call For End To Syrian Violence

Syrian president Bashar Assad continues violent repression of anti--government demonstrators. Guest host David Greene speaks with NPR's Kelly McEvers about the situation in Syria.

3:00pm

Sat August 13, 2011
Election 2012

Gov. Perry Announces Run For President

Texas Gov. Rick Perry has been quietly laying the groundwork for a run for the Republican presidential nomination. Last weekend, he headlined a prayer event in Houston that drew tens of thousands of worshippers. Saturday in Charleston, S.C., Perry announced that he is entering the race. Guest host David Greene talks with Julie Rose of member station WFAE.

3:00pm

Sat August 13, 2011
Analysis

Historian: Tax Law A Turning Point For Reagan

Thirty years ago today, President Ronald Reagan signed the Economic Recovery Tax Act, the first major tax cut during his presidency. Guest host David Greene talks with Reagan historian Douglas Brinkley about the act's legacy and how it still affects American discourse on taxation.

3:00pm

Sat August 13, 2011
Analysis

Week In News: Federal Budget, Supercommittee

This past week, Congress selected the 12 members of its "supercommittee" to slash the federal budget by the end of November. Host David Greene speaks with James Fallows of The Atlantic about the potential dangers of treating the federal budget the way families treat their own budgets.

5:14pm

Fri August 12, 2011
Planet Money

'The End Of The Line For The Euro'

Here in America when we go to the beach, we read romance novels or mysteries.

France is different sort of place. Over the past few weeks, the French have been obsessed with an economic thriller called Terminus pour L'Euro — The End of the Line for the Euro. It was published in Le Monde, one of the biggest newspapers in France.

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4:34pm

Fri August 12, 2011
Movie Interviews

Octavia Spencer: You Can't 'Help' But Feel This Film

If the audience is uncomfortable watching The Help, that's appropriate, says actress Octavia Spencer: "People lived this discomfort." Spencer plays Minny Jackson — an African-American maid in 1960s Mississippi — in the film adaptation of Kathryn Stockett's controversial novel.
Dale Robinette Dreamworks Pictures

The movie adaptation of the best-selling book, The Help roared into theaters this week, racking up more than $5 million in box office receipts on its opening day.

It closely follows Kathryn Stockett's novel about life among well-to-do white women in 1960s Jackson, Miss. The book told that story in large part from the point-of-view of the black women who served them — which earned Stockett both praise and condemnation.

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3:36pm

Fri August 12, 2011
Planet Money

Preschool: The Best Job-Training Program

Job training.
The Co-Op School

When economist James Heckman was studying the effects of job training programs on unskilled young workers, he found a mystery.

He was comparing a group of workers that had gone through a job training program with a group that hadn't. And he found that, at best, the training program did nothing to help the workers get better jobs. In some cases, the training program even made the workers worse off.

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2:56pm

Fri August 12, 2011
Movie Interviews

Remembering RFK's Visit To 'The Land Of Apartheid'

A Meeting Of Great Minds: During his 1966 visit to South Africa, Sen. Robert F. Kennedy met with anti-apartheid activist Chief Luthuli and later spoke publicly about their meeting. Because of a government ban on media coverage of Luthuli, it was the first news many had of their leader in more than five years.
Shoreline Productions

In June of 1966, just two years before he was shot and killed in Los Angeles, Sen. Robert F. Kennedy went to South Africa to speak out against apartheid. There, at the University of Cape Town, he gave a speech — known as the "Ripple of Hope" speech — that would be repeated over and over again and even etched onto his tombstone.

In that speech, Kennedy told a crowd of white, anti-apartheid students,

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5:06pm

Thu August 11, 2011
Planet Money

Drug Dealing, Counterfeiting, Smuggling: How North Korea Makes Money

An idle North Korean factory, seen from the Chinese border.
AFP Getty Images

North Korea used to be an industrial powerhouse. Not anymore. Today, the country can't feed its own people. Its cities go dark every night for lack of electricity.

Yet helplessness wasn't the original plan. The original plan for the country's economy had a name. It was called "juche," or self-reliance. The idea was that all North Korean problems should be solved by North Koreans.

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4:20pm

Thu August 11, 2011
Culture And Traditions

In Senegal, The Grandmas Are In Charge

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:33 am

Lightening the mood, the otherwise serious health care proceedings are punctuated by song and dance.
Ofeibea Quist-Arcton NPR

Long before you reach the circle of women, you hear them and feel their exuberance and warmth. These are the "grandmothers," fondly called les grandes-meres and dressed in brightly colored boubous — the voluminous traditional gowns with dramatic matching head wraps worn by the women of Senegal.

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4:45pm

Wed August 10, 2011
Three Books...

Three Tales Of The Ghostly, Ghastly And Ghoulish

iStockphoto.com

When people hear you're a writer, they often ask "where do you get your ideas?"

I sometimes wonder too, but in most cases I curb my curiosity. The eccentric private lives of certain authors, their unconventional lifestyles, their all-round touch of strange carry an implied warning — my friend, you don't want to know.


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4:41pm

Wed August 10, 2011
Dance

A Flamenco Pilgrimage, In Pursuit Of Duende

Flamenco dancer Merche Esmeralda performs during a flamenco festival in Jerez, Spain, in 2006.
Jose Luis Roca AFP/Getty Images

I've been dancing flamenco for years. I love it. Flamenco's got attitude. It makes me feel like I've got attitude. Dancing is like letting out a scream from the feet up, all emotion and passion. I need it after the work I do every day. As a public defender in Manhattan, I deal with clients stuck in desperate situations.

Flamenco recharges me. It's exotic, and fun, and I'm good at it. But no matter how long I've been dancing, I'm never as good as I want to be. Maybe because I'm not a professional, or maybe because I'm not a Gypsy.

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4:07pm

Tue August 9, 2011
Music Reviews

Jay-Z And Kanye West: Stuck In Cruise Control

Kanye West and Jay-Z's highly anticipated collaboration made its debut Tuesday on iTunes.
Daniel Boczarski Getty Images

My favorite part of Watch the Throne, the new joint release by Kanye West and Jay-Z, was waiting for it to come out. With no leaks and no advances, we were all reduced to waiting together, resurrecting the memory of rushing record-store doors the day of release.

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