All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-7pm and Weekends 5-6PM
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Jonese Franklin

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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3:00pm

Tue August 23, 2011
NPR Story

Why Do Middle Eastern Dictators Love Scuds?

Libyan government forces fired a Scud missile Monday near Sirte. It's at least the second time the Scud has been used in the conflict. Ousted Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak also had Scuds in his arsenal. Brian Palmer gives Robert Siegel a brief history of the Soviet-made missile and tells us why Middle Eastern dictators love the Scud. Palmer writes the Explainer column for Slate.com.

3:00pm

Tue August 23, 2011
NPR Story

Letters: Greek Yogurt; Summer Sounds

Robert Siegel and Melissa Block read emails from listeners.

3:00pm

Tue August 23, 2011
NPR Story

Remembering Nick Ashford and Jerry Leiber

Melissa Block talks with soul singer Ben E. King about the passing of two legendary songwriters, Nick Ashford and Jerry Leiber, this week. Nick Ashford of Ashford and Simpson co-wrote some of Motown's biggest hits including "Ain't No Mountain High Enough." He died at Monday at age 70. Jerry Leiber penned the lyrics for songs such as "Jailhouse Rock" for Elvis — and one of Ben E. King's signature tunes "Spanish Harlem." Lieber also died on Monday. He was 78.

3:00pm

Tue August 23, 2011
From Our Listeners

Summer Sounds: Cicadas

Our Summer Sounds feature presents Brian McConnachie's memories of cicadas and a curious myth surrounding them: The clicks add up to the predicted high temperature of the day.

3:00pm

Tue August 23, 2011
Governing

White House Rolls Back Regulations

Under fire from Republicans for a heavy-handed regulatory environment, the Obama administration Tuesday announced a roll back of hundreds of federal regulations.

3:00pm

Tue August 23, 2011
Around the Nation

Earthquake Shakes East Coast

A 5.9 magnitude earthquake shook the East Coast Tuesday. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, the epicenter of the quake was about 40 miles northwest of Richmond, Va. Melissa Block talks to NPR's Chris Joyce for more.

3:00pm

Tue August 23, 2011
Europe

News Corp May Have Paid British Prime Minister's Aid

Prime Minister David Cameron is facing embarrassing new allegations connected to the phone hacking scandal in Britain. Cameron was criticized for hiring former News of The World editor Andy Coulson to be his communications chief. Coulson resigned in January this year. But now, there are reports that Coulson continued to receive payments and benefits from the newspaper — even while working for Cameron's government.

3:00pm

Tue August 23, 2011
Around the Nation

Earthquake Sends Tremors From N.H. To N.C.

A magnitude 5.9 earthquake struck the Northeast Tuesday, sending tremors from New Hampshire to North Carolina. Office buildings were evacuated in major cities and a nuclear plant near the quake's epicenter in Virginia was taken offline.

3:00pm

Mon August 22, 2011
History

Martin Luther King Memorial Opens

After years of debate, fundraising and construction, the Martin Luther King Jr. National Memorial opened to the public Monday

3:00pm

Mon August 22, 2011
NPR Story

Chavez Wants Gold Holdings Transferred To Venezuela

Melissa Block talks with Jack Farchy of the Financial Times about the challenge of shipping huge amounts of gold overseas. Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez has announced he wants all the country's holdings in gold physically moved to Venezuela. The logistics are tricky — but even trickier is the issue of insurance.

3:00pm

Mon August 22, 2011
NPR Story

What Happens To Gadhafi's Weapons Caches?

With the situation in Libya becoming increasingly chaotic, Melissa Block speaks with Rand Corporation senior policy analyst Frederic Wehrey about the fate of Moammar Gadhafi's weapons caches.

3:00pm

Mon August 22, 2011
NPR Story

Prosecutors Expected To Drop Strauss-Kahn Case

The Manhattan district attorney is expected to recommend dropping the charges against Dominique Strauss-Kahn when the former IMF head appears in court on Tuesday. Lawyers for Strauss-Kahn's accuser are meeting with the D.A. on Monday afternoon in New York. Melissa Block speaks with NPR's Joel Rose.

3:00pm

Mon August 22, 2011
Africa

Libyan Rebels Claim Control Of Most Of Tripoli

After easy advance into the Libya capital of Tripoli Sunday, rebels are encountering resistance inside the city, especially around the barracks that are Moammar Gadhafi's official residential compound.

3:00pm

Mon August 22, 2011
Race

How Close Are We To Realizing King's 'Dream'?

The opening of the Martin Luther King Jr. National Memorial in Washington, D.C., comes at a time when it's hard to tell just how close we are to King's "dream." To help us appraise that, Robert Siegel speaks with Julian Bond, a veteran civil rights activist and former chairman of the NAACP.

3:24pm

Sun August 21, 2011
Religion

A Ramadan Story Of Two Faiths Bound In Friendship

The welcome sign that stood in front of Heartsong Church.
Michelle Worth Heartsong Church

It's Ramadan, the month-long holiday when Muslims fast from dawn to dusk as a way to cleanse the soul and reflect on their relationship with God. The faithful usually flock to their local mosques for prayer during the holiday, but last year, the Muslims of Cordova, Tenn., just outside Memphis, didn't have a place to go.

That's when Pastor Steve Stone put an unusual sign outside his church.

"It said, 'Welcome to the neighborhood, Memphis Islamic Center,'" he laughs. "It's been seen all over the world, now."

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2:31pm

Sun August 21, 2011
Author Interviews

Master Hacker Kevin Mitnick Shares His 'Addiction'

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 5:29 pm

Former computer hacker Kevin Mitnick now works as a security consultant. He is also the author of The Art of Deception and The Art of Intrusion.
Jari Tomminen

Famed hacker Kevin Mitnick was 12 years old when he realized he could talk his way to glory and free bus rides.

Mitnick figured out he could ride for free if he found a way to punch his own transfer. He conned a bus driver into telling him where to buy a punch, dug a packet of blank transfers out of a dumpster, and presto – free rides.

That story appears in Mitnick's new memoir, Ghost in the Wires: My Adventures as the World's Most Wanted Hacker.

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3:14pm

Sat August 20, 2011
Author Interviews

'Madness' And Leadership, Hand In Hand

President John F. Kennedy is one of many figures Nassir Ghaemi cites in his argument for a link between leadership and madness.
National Archives Getty Images

If you think about the challenges facing the men and women running for president, you might think about travel, long hours, endless public scrutiny and complete erosion of privacy. The reward that waits after victory is more pressure: a huge weight of responsibility. It's hard not to wonder who would actually want that job.

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3:00pm

Sat August 20, 2011
NPR Story

Week In News: 'West Memphis Three'

The "West Memphis Three" — the men convicted of killing three young boys in West Memphis, Ark. — were freed Friday. Guest host Laura Sullivan talks with James Fallows of The Atlantic about how the odd legal maneuver that led to their freedom and about the week's other big stories.

3:00pm

Sat August 20, 2011
NPR Story

Rebels Close In On Libyan Capital

Rebel forces in Libya captured the key tactical city of Zawiyah on Saturday and fighting has reportedly broken out in the capital city of Tripoli. Host Laura Sullivan speaks with NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro from Zawiyah as the rebels close in on Col. Moammar Gadhafi.

12:00pm

Sat August 20, 2011
Music Interviews

Grey Reverend: Bedroom Ballads, Spare By Necessity

Grey Reverend's debut full-length is called Of The Days.
Courtesy of the artist

Larry "L.D." Brown, an acoustic songwriter who performs as Grey Reverend, suffers from one of the worst ailments a guitarist can have. Some years ago, he discovered he had focal dystonia, a neurological condition that causes muscles to constrict involuntarily, and which eventually caused Brown to lose the use of his left ring and pinky fingers.

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5:23pm

Fri August 19, 2011
Music Interviews

Amy LaVere: Shaking Heartbreak

Amy LaVere's new album is called Stranger Me.
Courtesy of the artist

In 2009, it was a difficult year for singer-songwriter Amy LaVere: Her producer died, her guitarist quit, and she split up with longtime boyfriend Paul Tyler, who had also been her drummer. LaVere poured her emotion into her writing, and the album that resulted was this year's Stranger Me.

"I went into this [album] probably with more insecurity than I have ever had," LaVere tells NPR's Laura Sullivan. "Just even the title of the record, Stranger Me, is me saying I don't really know who I am in this."

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5:08pm

Fri August 19, 2011
Jazz

The Healing Power Of Blues Dancing

A couple dances at the Polish Club in San Francisco, which hosts a night of blues dancing every Monday.
Alexis Estrada

Blues was once called the devil's music, but for many, it has transformative, healing power. Every Monday night in San Francisco's Mission District, devout blues followers descend upon the Polish Club for a night of dancing in an unconventional style.

Blues dancing, which requires participants to appear to be in love with their dancing partners — including strangers — has helped some at the Polish Club to turn their lives around. Click the link at the top of the page to hear the story of three dancers who say they've felt changed by power of the blues.

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4:31pm

Fri August 19, 2011
Commentary

Summer Sounds: Panting

Commentator Andrei Codrescu adds to our arsenal of Summer Sounds with an essay about the panting of his two dogs. They have very different personalities, but share the panting gene.

3:00pm

Fri August 19, 2011
NPR Story

West Memphis Three Set Free

In Arkansas Friday, three men convicted of killing several young Cub Scouts and dumping their bodies in a ditch changed their pleas. It resolves a years-long effort to win their freedom after evidence showed they didn't commit the crimes.

3:00pm

Fri August 19, 2011
Asia

Activist Fasts To Fight Indian Corruption

In India, anti-corruption activist Anna Hazare has struck a chord with tens of thousands of his countrymen fed up with government malfeasance. He has been fasting and campaigning for a strict anti-corruption law, much stronger than the one the government has proposed. The law would allow for prosecution at all levels, including the prime minister and the judiciary. Government efforts to negotiate with Hazare broke down, and he was arrested earlier this week. That in turn sparked large protests outside the jail where he was being held.

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3:00pm

Fri August 19, 2011
NPR Story

In Verizon Workers Strike, Negotiations Continue

About 45,000 Verizon workers stayed out on strike for a second week. Negotiations continue, but the company and the union are standing by their original positions: Verizon wants workers in its traditional phone company business to pay for more of their health benefits.

2:13pm

Fri August 19, 2011
Opinion

After Miscarriage, Missing The Luxury Of Grieving

iStockphoto.com

Ken Harbaugh is a former Navy pilot and an NPR commentator.

It has been three months since the miscarriage. We weren't far along, still in the first trimester, so only our closest friends knew we were expecting.

Annmarie, my wife, is fine. At least, her body is fine. There is something broken in both of us, though.

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4:24pm

Thu August 18, 2011
Food

Sweet Lessons From A South Carolina Peach Professor

Is It Ripe? "To pick a perfect peach, obviously you need to pick it off the tree yourself," says Clemson University peach specialist Desmond Layne. But for those of us who pick peaches in supermarkets and not in orchards, he has three simple suggestions: Smell it. Squeeze it. Look at where it's from.
iStockphoto.com

Desmond Layne may just have the best job in America. He's a peach specialist at Clemson University in South Carolina — and a fruit video star. Layne posts weekly videos from out in the orchard, where he samples his peach pick of the week.

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3:58pm

Thu August 18, 2011
Movies

On Location: The Frozen Ozarks Of 'Winter's Bone'

Jennifer Lawrence, as Ree Dolly in Winter's Bone, on the front porch of Frank Layson's house in southwestern Missouri. Layson's hand-built house served as the home for the Dolly children in the film.
Sebastian Mlynarski Roadside Attractions

Set in the Ozarks, in a small community where illegal methamphetamine trade flourishes in a devastated economy, Winter's Bone follows the travails of Ree Dolly, a 17-year-old girl who spends the length of the film trudging through the bleak chill of southwestern Missouri in its darkest season, with the trees black spikes and hills bleached silver and rust. Ree's father, a meth cooker, has gone missing while out on bail, but not before putting the house his three children live in up as collateral against his bond.

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5:40pm

Wed August 17, 2011
The Record

Who Is Inspecting Outdoor Stages?

The stage collapses at the Indiana State Fair in Indianapolis on Aug. 13. The stage fell just before country duo Sugarland were scheduled to perform, killing at least four people and injuring as many as 40.
Joey Foley Getty Images

Investigators are looking for clues about what led to the tragic collapse of an outdoor concert stage at the Indiana State Fair. Five people were killed on Saturday when a 60-mph gust of wind blew the roof and metal scaffolding onto a crowd that was waiting for the band Sugarland to start playing.

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