All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-7pm and Weekends 5-6PM
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Jonese Franklin

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

Genre: 

Pages

4:39pm

Mon August 29, 2011
Latin America

Wiretaping Scandal Shakes Colombia

Originally published on Mon August 29, 2011 5:50 pm

Former Colombian President Alvaro Uribe (left) speaks during a public congressional hearing in Bogota Aug. 8 about allegations that the country's intelligence service spied on high court judges during his government.
Eitan Abramovich AFP/Getty Images

In Colombia, a major scandal involving the country's intelligence service is unfolding. Colombia's chief prosecutor says the spy service bugged the Supreme Court, intercepted the phones of its justices and followed their every move.

Prosecutors also say the illegal surveillance was directed from the offices of former President Alvaro Uribe, who in his eight years in power was Washington's closest ally in Latin America.

Read more

4:00pm

Mon August 29, 2011
The Record

The Tech Whiz Behind Lil Wayne's Curtain

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 2:40 pm

Mazy Kazerooni.
Brian Solis

Lil Wayne released his new album, Tha Carter IV, on Monday at midnight. It's been more than three years since his last official, full-length album, the triple-platinum-selling, Grammy-winning Tha Carter III. During the drought Lil Wayne had various legal issues and served eight months in prison. But his fan base has continued to grow, thanks to his digital strategy.

Read more

3:00pm

Mon August 29, 2011
NPR Story

Irene Batters Northeast

Irene had lost a lot of power when it hit New England as a tropical storm, but that didn't keep it from packing a punch. Roads and bridges were destroyed in Vermont. And in neighboring New York, a dam gave way, flooding homes and businesses downstream.

3:00pm

Mon August 29, 2011
NPR Story

Obama Names Krueger Chief Economic Adviser

Originally published on Mon August 29, 2011 7:38 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, host: This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host: And I'm Robert Siegel.

President Obama has chosen Princeton economist Alan Krueger to fill the top spot on his Council of Economic Advisors. The appointment comes as Mr. Obama prepares to unveil a new jobs package in hopes of reducing the nation's painfully high unemployment rate.

NPR's Scott Horsley reports that Krueger is a student of the job market. And he is expected to advocate more aggressive government action.

Read more

1:41pm

Sun August 28, 2011
Movie Interviews

A Filmmaker On The Complexities Of 'Debt'

Director John Madden works on the set of his espionage thriller The Debt, a remake of a 2007 Israeli film of the same name. Madden says he was initially attracted to the story's complexity.
Laurie Sparham Focus Features

English movie director John Madden has made a name for himself with quirky literary history (Shakespeare in Love) and mathematical intrigue (Proof). But his latest, The Debt, is a very different kind of film — an intense thriller about a group of young Israeli Mossad agents in the 1960s whose mission is to track down and capture a Nazi war criminal.

Read more

1:16pm

Sun August 28, 2011
Technology

Review Too Good To Be True? Sometimes It Is

iStockphoto
Kristian Septimius Krogh iStockphoto

From local plumbers to luxury hotels, just about everyone selling a service these days has an online reputation. Increasingly, that reputation is shaped by online reviews: Customer ratings on sites such as Yelp and Urbanspoon can, for example, make or break a new restaurant.

It's no wonder, then, that some businesses are trying to fake us out. On Craigslist and online forums, posters are offering to buy and sell gushing reviews for just a few bucks; potential customers aren't able to tell the difference.

Read more

1:16pm

Sun August 28, 2011
Afghanistan

In Afghanistan, Building Up Means Scaling Down

Rex Goodnight (right) works with contractors in Afghanistan. His program, Afghanistan Reachback, works to create buildings using the resources Afghans actually have.
Courtesy of Rex Goodnight

Rex Goodnight went to Afghanistan last year to volunteer on construction projects, but came back frustrated.

Goodnight, chief of engineering with the Kansas City district of the Army Corps, saw a lot of planning but not much actual constructing. When something was being built, it was usually made out of clay and straw.

Read more

3:08pm

Sat August 27, 2011
Author Interviews

'Flash And Bones': A High-Speed Murder Mystery

Forensic anthropology applies the study of the human skeleton to the legal process.
iStockphoto

The grisly discovery of a dead body stuffed in a 35-gallon drum full of asphalt and dumped at a landfill next to North Carolina's Charlotte Motor Speedway kicks off Kathy Reichs' new novel, Flash and Bones.

Reichs, a forensic anthropologist, is the author of the books that inspired the Fox TV series Bones. Her latest sends her heroine, medical examiner Temperance Brennan, on a journey through the underbelly of Charlotte's NASCAR racing scene.

Read more

3:00pm

Sat August 27, 2011
NPR Story

Hurricane Irene Begins Vicious Churn Up East Coast

Hurricane Irene touched down in North Carolina on Saturday morning and has been making its way up the coast. Host Laura Sullivan speaks with NPR's Greg Allen from the Outer Banks of North Carolina and NPR's Nate Rott from Maryland's Eastern Shore.

3:00pm

Sat August 27, 2011
NPR Story

NASCAR Drivers Pair Up On Track

Host Laura Sullivan speaks to ESPN Magazine writer Ryan McGee about the latest trend in NASCAR: tandem racing, a technique in which two cars are able to race as a team, much like bikers do in the Tour de France — but it's increasingly controversial among drivers and fans.

3:00pm

Sat August 27, 2011
Around the Nation

As Storm Looms, NYC Shuts Down Mass Transit

For the first time ever, the New York Public Transit System (busses, trains, subways) shut down Saturday. Local officials are preparing for the arrival of Hurricane Irene.

5:22pm

Fri August 26, 2011
NPR Story

Looking Into Libya's Most Notorious Prison

One of Moammar Gadhafi's last major strongholds in Tripoli has fallen to rebel forces. Among the survivors of the ferocious street fighting are prisoners from the Abu Salim prison, some of whom have been jailed for more than two decades.

3:23pm

Fri August 26, 2011
Movie Interviews

For Vera Farmiga, A Search Leads To 'Higher Ground'

Vera Farmiga as Corinne Walker in the film Higher Ground, which Farmiga also directed.
Molly Hawkey Courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics

Vera Farmiga isn't one to shy away from a challenge. Her new film, Higher Ground, goes to risky territory. Farmiga stars as Corinne Walker, an evangelical woman struggling to deal with the faith that has let her down. And she takes on a second role, as a first-time director.

Read more

3:09pm

Fri August 26, 2011
Music News

Imelda May: Devil May Care

Imelda May's new album is called Mayhem.
Chris Clor

Imelda May is an Irish singer whose music straddles the line between rockabilly and blues. That's an intriguing mix, though not the most natural fit for mainstream radio. May says that when she began her recording career, the advice she received was less than encouraging.

Read more

3:00pm

Fri August 26, 2011
NPR Story

NYC To Shut Down Public Transit

Cities along the East Coast are bracing for Hurricane Irene. New York City's public transportation will shut down around noon on Saturday, says New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

3:00pm

Fri August 26, 2011
NPR Story

Hurricane Irene Approaches N.C.

Hurricane Irene has spent the day churning toward the United States. While the eye of the storm is far offshore, rain bands from the tropical system are already lashing the Carolinas. NPR's Greg Allen speaks with Melissa Block with the latest from Virginia.

3:00pm

Fri August 26, 2011
NPR Story

Letters: Town Halls; Leslie Lanier and Beaver Tillett; Attorneys General

Melissa Block and Robert Siegel clarify a report and update a story from Thursday's show, and Robert presents a defense to his use of the grammatically incorrect term "Attorneys General."

3:00pm

Fri August 26, 2011
NPR Story

Why The Hacker Group Anonymous Does What It Does

The hacker group Anonymous launched high-profile attacks against the websites of Sony, the government of Egypt and the Bay Area's transit system. The group's attacks aren't motivated by financial gain.

3:00pm

Fri August 26, 2011
Around the Nation

Hurricane Irene: A Storm's Character Profile

Robert Siegel gets a profile on Hurricane Irene from Bill Read, director of the National Hurricane Center.

8:25am

Fri August 26, 2011
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

What Einstein Missed: Where Relativity And Road Trips Meet

iStockphoto

Yes, it was Albert Einstein who unified space and time together into a single, coherent whole. As a physicist I can say that was a pretty impressive feat, but as parent — slogging across interstate whatever on the last weekend of the summer — I have to ask: What's the big deal?

Anyone stuck in vacation traffic with kids in tow can tell you that Space and Time have always been unified but not in the wiggly, abstract sense my buddy Al Einstein was talking about.

Read more

5:30pm

Thu August 25, 2011
The Record

A Dwindling Trust Puts Free Concerts On The Rocks

Perth Amboy, NJ's long-running free concert series is just one program threatened by loss of funding as the Music Performance Trust Fund dries up.
Felix Contreras

Over the next few weeks, we're producing stories about the business of putting on free concerts, how they work and what they bring to their communities. Last week's Weekend Edition Saturday story covered non-profit concert presenters in New York City.

Read more

4:54pm

Thu August 25, 2011
Around the Nation

New Deportation Rules Give Boost To Gay Rights

Anthony Makk (right) and husband Bradford Wells at their San Francisco home on Aug. 8. Though legally married in 2004, Makk faces deportation back to his native Australia.
Noah Berger San Francisco Chronicle via Polaris Images

Thousands of same-sex married couples now have hopes of staying together in the U.S. thanks to a change in deportation policy. The government says it will now prioritize deportations, giving lower priority to those with families in the U.S.

And the Obama administration has included same-sex couples in its definition of family.

Left In Legal Limbo

Bradford Wells, 55, a longtime resident of San Francisco, has good days and bad days.

Read more

3:00pm

Thu August 25, 2011
NPR Story

In Praise Of Fiction And Reading

The remarks of Mario Vargas Llosa at the Nobel lecture celebrating his award of the prize for literature in 2010 have been published. The speech praises the value of fiction. Alan Cheuse, who teaches writing at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, has a review — and contrasts Llosa's thoughts with those of novelist Phillip Roth, who's been quoted recently as having lost his interest in fiction.

9:00am

Thu August 25, 2011
Tiny Desk Concerts

James Vincent McMorrow: Tiny Desk Concert

Emily Bogle NPR
  • Audio Only: James Vincent McMorrow's Tiny Desk Concert

Irish singer-songwriter James Vincent McMorrow has one of the most arresting voices of any young singer you're likely to hear this year: He's got the heartbreaking falsetto of a Justin Vernon (Bon Iver) and the raspy soul of a Ray LaMontagne, in a way that sounds both fragile and grand.

Read more

7:06pm

Wed August 24, 2011
Technology

Apple's Steve Jobs Resigns

Steve Jobs is resigning as CEO of Apple. Jobs has engineered Apple's transformation of our relationship with our computers, phones and music. Jobs has been on medical leave from the day-to-day running of the company. The company said that Jobs will be replaced by Tim Cook, Apple's chief operating officer. For more on this story, Melissa Block talks to NPR's Laura Sydell.

5:37pm

Wed August 24, 2011
Economy

CBO Releases Report On Economy, Federal Budget

The federal budget problem has gotten a little bit better. That's according to the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office, which released a new report Wednesday. The CBO estimates that this year's deficit will hit about $1.3 trillion. That's a huge amount of red ink — but it's also slightly less red ink than last year.

4:33pm

Wed August 24, 2011
Movies

On Location: 'Fort Apache,' A War Zone In The Bronx

Paul Newman (center) as Murphy, a conflicted police officer, in the 1981 film Fort Apache, The Bronx.
20th Century Fox The Kobal Collection

When the film Fort Apache, The Bronx, starring Paul Newman as a conflicted cop patrolling a neighborhood ravaged by poverty and drugs, came out in 1981, it was a controversial hit. Local community leaders fought with the film's producers and threatened to sue because of the way the film depicted blacks and Puerto Ricans.

Read more

3:00pm

Wed August 24, 2011
NPR Story

Summer Sounds: Kiddie Train

The Saint Louis Zoo has a little train that recalls the Summer Sounds of producer Sean Collins' past. He revisits that little locomotive that inspired him.

5:00pm

Tue August 23, 2011
The Record

Nick Ashford, Songwriter And Singer, Has Died

Nickolas Ashford and Valerie Simpson on stage in New York around 1978.
Richard E. Aaron Redferns

Nick Ashford's songs are so ingrained in American culture they almost seem to have written themselves — songs such as "Ain't No Mountain High Enough" and "You're All I Need to Get By." Ashford was married to his songwriting partner, Valerie Simpson, for over 30 years. Ashford died Monday at the age of 70.

Ashford and Simpson wrote "Ain't Nothing Like The Real Thing" for Marvin Gaye and Tammy Terrell, "Reach Out and Touch (Somebody's Hand)" for Diana Ross and "Solid as a Rock" for themselves.

Read more

3:00pm

Tue August 23, 2011
NPR Story

Why Do Middle Eastern Dictators Love Scuds?

Libyan government forces fired a Scud missile Monday near Sirte. It's at least the second time the Scud has been used in the conflict. Ousted Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak also had Scuds in his arsenal. Brian Palmer gives Robert Siegel a brief history of the Soviet-made missile and tells us why Middle Eastern dictators love the Scud. Palmer writes the Explainer column for Slate.com.

Pages