All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-7pm and Weekends 5-6PM
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Jonese Franklin

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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3:06pm

Sat September 3, 2011
Music News

Glen Campbell: Forget Me Not

Legendary country singer Glen Campbell's new album, Ghost on the Canvas, will be his last. Campbell is suffering the early stages of Alzheimer's, and he's decided to release one more record as a final farewell.
Collin Stark Courtesy of the artist

In his new album's liner notes, Glen Campbell writes, "Ghost on the Canvas is the last studio record of new songs that I ever plan to make."

That's because he's now living through the early stages of Alzheimer's. A man whose music history spans six decades is slowly losing his own history — his memories of being one of L.A.'s top session guitarists, playing on everything from "Strangers in the Night" to "Good Vibrations," with an outfit called The Wrecking Crew.

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1:49pm

Sat September 3, 2011
Author Interviews

The Inside Track On New York's High Line

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:28 am

The High Line's Wildflower Field stretches from New York City's West 27th Street to West 29th Street and is made up of native plant species that once grew on the unused High Line as well as new species that bloom throughout the growing season.
Iwan Baan

In August 1999, Joshua David walked into a community board meeting in New York City's Chelsea neighborhood.

People were debating what to do with an old, elevated rail track that ran through the neighborhood between Gansevoort and 34 Street. It had been abandoned since 1980. Before that, it was built to haul goods into the city's meatpacking district.

David thought it was kind of a cool old relic, and he thought other people would feel the same.

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12:00pm

Sat September 3, 2011
Music News

The Clown Of The Orchestra Takes Its Revenge

The Breaking Winds achieved viral fame last year with a Lady Gaga medley video.
Kate Lemmon

You might think you haven't heard the bassoon outside a concert hall before, but you have: The woodwind instrument features prominently in the theme music of Leave It To Beaver, represents the grandfather character in Peter and the Wolf, and scores Mickey Mouse's misadventure with the dancing broomsticks in Fantasia. Notice a trend there?

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6:06pm

Fri September 2, 2011
Economy

Federal Agency Sues Banks Over Mortgage Securities

The Federal Housing Finance Agency sued several major banks over risky mortgage securities they sold. Melissa Block talks to NPR's Jim Zarroli for more.

4:31pm

Fri September 2, 2011
Monkey See

Hugh Laurie Sings The Blues

Hugh Laurie, seen here playing Dr. Gregory House on House, has a new project.
Ray Mickshaw Fox

Fans of Hugh Laurie on House -- a show for which he's been nominated for six Emmys — know that grumpy Dr. House doesn't get at all of Laurie's talents. He was previously best known for comedy, particularly what he did with Stephen Fry on shows like Jeeves And Wooster. But on House, while he does plenty of dark comedy, he also plays heavy drama.

And now he's released an album of New Orleans and Delta blues. (He knows its' a little counterintuitive. But that's okay.)

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4:29pm

Fri September 2, 2011
Planet Money

Switzerland: Too Strong For Its Own Good

Arnd Wiegmann Reuters

The world economy is so messed up right now that even healthy countries are facing a strange kind of crisis: They've become too popular with investors.

Take Switzerland. Its economy is in great shape. Low debt, low unemployment. And, perhaps most importantly, the country doesn't use the euro.

So it's not surprising that the Swiss Franc has become a popular safe haven among investors who are worried about the future of the euro and the U.S. dollar.

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1:23pm

Fri September 2, 2011
Music Interviews

Hugh Laurie's New Orleans Romp, By Way Of Oxford

Hugh Laurie worked with producer Joe Henry, Allen Toussaint, Irma Thomas and Dr. John on his debut album, Let Them Talk.
Michael Wilson

Fans of the TV medical drama House know actor Hugh Laurie as the sardonic, limping, Vicodin-popping title character, Dr. Gregory House. From time to time, Dr. House will noodle at the piano, and that's no act: Laurie started playing piano as a child in England. Now, on his debut album Let Them Talk, he's romping through the music he loves best: New Orleans and Delta blues.

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6:23pm

Thu September 1, 2011
Science

For Protesters, Keystone Pipeline Is Line In Tar Sand

Originally published on Thu September 1, 2011 9:39 pm

U.S. Park Police officers arrest demonstrators in front of the While House on Thursday. They were protesting against a proposed 1,700-mile-long pipeline that would carry oil from the tar sands in Alberta, Canada, to the U.S. Gulf Coast.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Dozens of environmental activists showed up in front of the White House Thursday to get arrested in a peaceful protest against a proposed oil pipeline that would cut across the American Midwest.

Organizers said that over the past 10 days, about 800 people have been handcuffed and bused off to a police station in this ongoing action.

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5:19pm

Thu September 1, 2011
Science

Human Brain Responds To Animals, Cute Or Creepy

The brain "seems to be specialized in alerting us to things that are emotionally important to us — either positive or because they're scary," a scientist says.
iStockphoto.com

Animals have a special place in the human heart. Now, researchers are reporting that creatures great and small also have a special place in our heads.

A team led by researchers at Caltech has found individual brain cells that respond when a person sees an animal, but not when that person sees another person, a place, or an object.

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4:00pm

Thu September 1, 2011
The Record

Reggae Loves Country: A 50-Year Romance

Beres Hammond onstage at Reggae Sunsplash in August of 1993. On Reggae Goes Country he sings "He Stopped Loving Her Today," most famously recorded by George Jones.
David Corio Redferns

VP Records is the largest distributor of reggae music, and Warner Music Nashville is a preeminent country label. What could the two have in common? This month, a joint album — Reggae's Gone Country.

Picture this: You're at a massive street dance in Kingston, Jamaica, and the speakers are blaring the latest reggae and dancehall tunes. But the crowd erupts when the DJ drops this one: Kenny Rogers' "The Gambler."

Surprised? Don't be, says veteran Jamaican reggae singer Freddie McGregor. He, like so many West Indians, is a huge country music fan. His favorite singer?

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4:00pm

Wed August 31, 2011
The Record

Why Gibson Guitar Was Raided By The Justice Department

Federal Investigators look through the workshop at the Gibson Guitar factory during a raid on the facility in Memphis on August 24th.
Jim Weber The Commercial Appeal/ZUMAPRESS.com

Last week federal marshals raided the Gibson Guitar Corporation in Tennessee. It wasn't the first time. The government appears to be preparing to charge the famous builder of instruments with trafficking in illegally obtained wood. It's a rare collision of music and environmental regulation.

In the hottest part of an August Tennessee day last Thursday, Gibson Guitar CEO Henry Juszkiewicz stood out in the full sun for 30 minutes and vented to the press about the events of the day before.

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3:00pm

Wed August 31, 2011
NPR Story

Justice Department Sues AT&T

AT&T's plan to take over T-Mobile is in trouble. The Justice Department filed suit Wednesday to block the $39 billion deal. Justice officials said combining the second and fourth largest U.S. cell phone companies would hurt competition — and likely keep prices higher than they would otherwise be.

3:00pm

Wed August 31, 2011
NPR Story

Paraphrase At MLK Memorial Draws Criticism

Melissa Block talks to Ed Jackson, Jr., the executive architect of the Martin Luther King memorial. They discuss the Martin Luther King "Drum Major" line that is etched on the north face of the monument. The line, taken from a February 1968 speech by King, was paraphrased. And one of the monument's high-profile consultants, poet Maya Angelou, told the Washington Post the inscription is misleading and makes the civil rights leader seem arrogant.

3:30pm

Tue August 30, 2011
The Record

Bluesman Honeyboy Edwards Has Died

David "Honeyboy" Edwards in an undated photo.
Dave Peabody Redferns

David "Honeyboy" Edwards, considered to be the last of a generation of musicians who brought music from the rural Mississippi Delta to the rest of America, died at his home in Chicago early Monday morning. He was 96 years old.

Honeyboy Edwards was born in 1915. He grew up in segregated Mississippi during Jim Crow. Though his dad was a share-cropper, the young Edwards did not work in the fields.

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3:00pm

Tue August 30, 2011
NPR Story

Abandoned: International Space Station?

Originally published on Tue August 30, 2011 6:11 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, host: I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK: I'm Melissa Block, and this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

SIEGEL: For nearly 11 years, we humans have had an uninterrupted presence on the International Space Station and that streak could be coming to an end. Last week, an unmanned Russian rocket loaded with supplies for the Space Station came crashing back to Earth. And Russia has now delayed future launches, pending an investigation of what went wrong.

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3:00pm

Tue August 30, 2011
NPR Story

Vermont Reels In Irene's Wake

Roads and bridges are out in Wilmington, Vt., in the wake of Hurricane Irene. Melissa Block talks with Fred Ventresco, town manager of Wilmington, for more.

3:00pm

Tue August 30, 2011
NPR Story

Top Justice Department Officials Resign

Two top Justice Department officials resign on the same day as Republicans in Congress vow not to let up on their oversight of a failed law enforcement operation known as Fast and Furious. Robert Siegel talks to NPR's Carrie Johnson for more.

3:00pm

Tue August 30, 2011
NPR Story

Sudan Accused Of Bombing Civilians In Kordofan

Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch say Sudanese planes have been terrorizing civilians in the Nuba mountains region of Southern Kordofan. Researchers from the two human rights groups managed to sneak into the region recently to document what they say have been ongoing and indiscriminate air strikes in the region. Sudan claims that the newly independent country of South Sudan is fomenting unrest in Kordofan. Human Rights groups say there is an armed conflict in the region, but that doesn't excuse attacks on civilians.

3:00pm

Tue August 30, 2011
Politics

Obama Addresses American Legion

President Obama traveled to Minneapolis today and addressed the annual national conference of the American Legion. Robert Siegel talks to NPR's Mara Liasson for more.

2:17pm

Tue August 30, 2011
Music Interviews

J.D. Souther: A 'Natural History' Of Songwriting

J.D. Souther, who long worked with The Eagles, says there are no rules to crafting a great song.
Jeremy Cowart

As part of the thriving 1970s country-rock scene in Southern California, J.D. Souther collaborated on many of The Eagles' hits, including "New Kid in Town." Souther has jazz in his background — his father was a big-band crooner — and his new album, titled A Natural History, does have a stripped-down jazz feel. Souther wrote all of these songs, many of which became classics for other artists. Now he's gone back and reclaimed them.

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4:39pm

Mon August 29, 2011
Latin America

Wiretaping Scandal Shakes Colombia

Originally published on Mon August 29, 2011 5:50 pm

Former Colombian President Alvaro Uribe (left) speaks during a public congressional hearing in Bogota Aug. 8 about allegations that the country's intelligence service spied on high court judges during his government.
Eitan Abramovich AFP/Getty Images

In Colombia, a major scandal involving the country's intelligence service is unfolding. Colombia's chief prosecutor says the spy service bugged the Supreme Court, intercepted the phones of its justices and followed their every move.

Prosecutors also say the illegal surveillance was directed from the offices of former President Alvaro Uribe, who in his eight years in power was Washington's closest ally in Latin America.

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4:00pm

Mon August 29, 2011
The Record

The Tech Whiz Behind Lil Wayne's Curtain

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 2:40 pm

Mazy Kazerooni.
Brian Solis

Lil Wayne released his new album, Tha Carter IV, on Monday at midnight. It's been more than three years since his last official, full-length album, the triple-platinum-selling, Grammy-winning Tha Carter III. During the drought Lil Wayne had various legal issues and served eight months in prison. But his fan base has continued to grow, thanks to his digital strategy.

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3:00pm

Mon August 29, 2011
NPR Story

Irene Batters Northeast

Irene had lost a lot of power when it hit New England as a tropical storm, but that didn't keep it from packing a punch. Roads and bridges were destroyed in Vermont. And in neighboring New York, a dam gave way, flooding homes and businesses downstream.

3:00pm

Mon August 29, 2011
NPR Story

Obama Names Krueger Chief Economic Adviser

Originally published on Mon August 29, 2011 7:38 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, host: This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host: And I'm Robert Siegel.

President Obama has chosen Princeton economist Alan Krueger to fill the top spot on his Council of Economic Advisors. The appointment comes as Mr. Obama prepares to unveil a new jobs package in hopes of reducing the nation's painfully high unemployment rate.

NPR's Scott Horsley reports that Krueger is a student of the job market. And he is expected to advocate more aggressive government action.

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1:41pm

Sun August 28, 2011
Movie Interviews

A Filmmaker On The Complexities Of 'Debt'

Director John Madden works on the set of his espionage thriller The Debt, a remake of a 2007 Israeli film of the same name. Madden says he was initially attracted to the story's complexity.
Laurie Sparham Focus Features

English movie director John Madden has made a name for himself with quirky literary history (Shakespeare in Love) and mathematical intrigue (Proof). But his latest, The Debt, is a very different kind of film — an intense thriller about a group of young Israeli Mossad agents in the 1960s whose mission is to track down and capture a Nazi war criminal.

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1:16pm

Sun August 28, 2011
Technology

Review Too Good To Be True? Sometimes It Is

iStockphoto
Kristian Septimius Krogh iStockphoto

From local plumbers to luxury hotels, just about everyone selling a service these days has an online reputation. Increasingly, that reputation is shaped by online reviews: Customer ratings on sites such as Yelp and Urbanspoon can, for example, make or break a new restaurant.

It's no wonder, then, that some businesses are trying to fake us out. On Craigslist and online forums, posters are offering to buy and sell gushing reviews for just a few bucks; potential customers aren't able to tell the difference.

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1:16pm

Sun August 28, 2011
Afghanistan

In Afghanistan, Building Up Means Scaling Down

Rex Goodnight (right) works with contractors in Afghanistan. His program, Afghanistan Reachback, works to create buildings using the resources Afghans actually have.
Courtesy of Rex Goodnight

Rex Goodnight went to Afghanistan last year to volunteer on construction projects, but came back frustrated.

Goodnight, chief of engineering with the Kansas City district of the Army Corps, saw a lot of planning but not much actual constructing. When something was being built, it was usually made out of clay and straw.

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3:08pm

Sat August 27, 2011
Author Interviews

'Flash And Bones': A High-Speed Murder Mystery

Forensic anthropology applies the study of the human skeleton to the legal process.
iStockphoto

The grisly discovery of a dead body stuffed in a 35-gallon drum full of asphalt and dumped at a landfill next to North Carolina's Charlotte Motor Speedway kicks off Kathy Reichs' new novel, Flash and Bones.

Reichs, a forensic anthropologist, is the author of the books that inspired the Fox TV series Bones. Her latest sends her heroine, medical examiner Temperance Brennan, on a journey through the underbelly of Charlotte's NASCAR racing scene.

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3:00pm

Sat August 27, 2011
NPR Story

Hurricane Irene Begins Vicious Churn Up East Coast

Hurricane Irene touched down in North Carolina on Saturday morning and has been making its way up the coast. Host Laura Sullivan speaks with NPR's Greg Allen from the Outer Banks of North Carolina and NPR's Nate Rott from Maryland's Eastern Shore.

3:00pm

Sat August 27, 2011
NPR Story

NASCAR Drivers Pair Up On Track

Host Laura Sullivan speaks to ESPN Magazine writer Ryan McGee about the latest trend in NASCAR: tandem racing, a technique in which two cars are able to race as a team, much like bikers do in the Tour de France — but it's increasingly controversial among drivers and fans.

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