All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-7pm and Weekends 5-6PM
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Jonese Franklin

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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11:43am

Fri September 9, 2011
Movie Reviews

Battles For Survival, Small-Scale And Huge

Tommy (Tom Hardy, left) and Brendan (Joel Edgerton) are battling brothers in Warrior — a domestic drama that feels surprisingly epic.
Chuck Zlotnick Lionsgate

Contagion is about a flu epidemic that causes millions of deaths, Warrior about sibling rivalry in a working-class family. The former is a disaster epic writ surprisingly small, the latter a domestic drama writ larger than you'd think. Both prove effective, both have intriguing structures; it's a good week for movie nuts.

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8:01pm

Thu September 8, 2011
NPR Story

A Recap Of Obama's Jobs Speech

Originally published on Thu September 8, 2011 8:01 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, host: From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

President Obama called on Congress tonight to stop the political circus and pass his plan, dubbed the American Jobs Act.

President BARACK OBAMA: There should be nothing controversial about this piece of legislation. Everything in here is the kind of proposal that's been supported by both Democrats and Republicans, including many who sit here tonight. And everything in this bill will be paid for - everything.

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8:01pm

Thu September 8, 2011
NPR Story

Schakowsky Discusses Obama's Speech

Originally published on Thu September 8, 2011 8:01 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, host: Joining us now is a Democrat, Jan Schakowsky, Democrat of Illinois, a member of the House Progressive Caucus, someone who's proposed her own jobs bill. Well, how did the president do?

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8:01pm

Thu September 8, 2011
NPR Story

Price Discusses Obama's Speech

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, host: Big question, of course, is how do Republicans in the House, where they are the majority, how did they react to the president's speech this evening. We're going to find out from one member of the House leadership right now. Congressman Tom Price of Georgia is chairman of the House Republican Policy Committee, and a member of the Budget Committee and the Ways and Means Committee. Welcome to the program once again.

Representative TOM PRICE: Thank you so much, Robert. Good to be with you.

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8:01pm

Thu September 8, 2011
Economy

Economists Discuss Obama's Jobs Speech

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, host: We've been hearing reactions to President Obama's jobs speech, which he made before a joint session of Congress. He started about an hour ago. Of course, he was done extremely early so that he could be done in time for the opening kickoff of the National Football League season. We'll have more on this subject.

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

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8:01pm

Thu September 8, 2011
Economy

A Look At Reaction To Obama's Jobs Speech

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, host: This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host: And I'm Robert Siegel. President Obama addressed a joint session of Congress this evening, urging adoption of what he called the American Jobs Act. It is a package of payroll tax cuts and spending increases aimed at jobless benefits and infrastructure improvements. The overall price tag is nearly $450 billion and the president said it will be all paid for.

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7:50pm

Thu September 8, 2011
NPR Story

Obama Presents His Jobs Plan To Congress

Robert Siegel talks to NPR's Mara Liasson, NPR's Scott Horsley and NPR's Andrea Seabrook for reaction.

7:03pm

Thu September 8, 2011
NPR Story

A Preview Of Obama's Jobs Speech

President Obama is slated to present his plan for job creation tonight. For more, Robert Siegel turns to NPR's Mara Liasson, NPR's Scott Horsley from the White House and NPR's Andrea Seabrook from the House chamber.

4:38pm

Wed September 7, 2011
Three Books...

Sick Of Young Adult Lit? 3 Books For The Whiz Kid

iStockphoto.com

If there's anything the writers I know share besides an unhealthy relationship to caffeine, it's a childhood spent immersed in books. All my young-adult favorites look more like accordions than novels, because they've been dropped into the bathtub so many times.

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3:00pm

Wed September 7, 2011
NPR Story

Witnesses Fail To Link Mubarak To Killings

The trial of former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak continued in Cairo Wednesday. Witnesses for the prosecution failed to connect Mubarak or his interior minister to the fatal shootings during protests that led to Mubarak's ouster.

3:00pm

Wed September 7, 2011
National Security

Panetta Discusses Cutting The Defense Budget

Defense Secretary Leon Panetta is managing two wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, along with the fight against al-Qaida.
Susan Walsh AP

Leon Panetta has been defense secretary for just over two months, and the challenges are already mounting. The biggest of all: figuring out how to keep America safe and keep putting pressure on al-Qaida — all for less money.

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2:31pm

Wed September 7, 2011
Music Interviews

Buddy Holly At 75: A Tribute To An Unlikely Star

Listen to Me features tributes from Buddy Holly's generation — Brian Wilson, Ringo Starr — and younger artists such as Zooey Deschanel.
Michael Ochs Archives Getty Images

He was an unlikely star — a rather plain-looking, geeky 20-something in thick-framed glasses. But with hits like "That'll Be the Day," "Rave On" and "Peggy Sue," Buddy Holly became a rockabilly icon. He was a pioneer.

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12:01pm

Wed September 7, 2011
Under Suspicion

Under Suspicion At The Mall Of America

Originally published on Thu September 8, 2011 10:42 am

The Mall of America, one of the nation's largest shopping and entertainment venues, is also home to its own counterterrorism unit.
Dawn Villela AP

Since Sept. 11, the nation's leaders have warned that government agencies like the CIA and the FBI can't protect the country on their own — private businesses and ordinary citizens have to look out for terrorists, too. So the Obama administration has been promoting programs like "See Something, Say Something" and the "Nationwide Suspicious Activity Reporting Initiative."

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4:43pm

Tue September 6, 2011
Author Interviews

Thomas Friedman On 'How America Fell Behind'

Thomas Friedman is the author of five best-selling books, including From Beirut to Jerusalem and The World Is Flat.
Fred Conrad

Back in March, Paul Otellini — president and CEO of Intel Corp. — compared the situation of present-day America to that of the U.K. at the turn of the last century.

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4:10pm

Tue September 6, 2011
Planet Money

How To Avoid The Oil Curse

One of the biggest problems any new government in Libya will face is something that doesn't seem like a problem: The massive amount of oil wealth the country possesses

Economists call it the natural-resource curse. Resource-rich countries often end up being ruled by dictators and autocrats. And the massive amount of money that floods into a country after oil discovery often has the perverse effect of putting existing industries out of business.

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3:00pm

Tue September 6, 2011
NPR Story

Taspinar Discusses Israel-Turkish Relations

The fallout continues from last year's bloody confrontation between troops from the Israel Defense Forces and activists aboard a Turkish aid flotilla bound for the Gaza coast. Robert Siegel speaks with Omer Taspinar, a Turkish scholar who is at the National War College and the Brookings institution.

1:57pm

Tue September 6, 2011
Music Interviews

Zoe Keating: A Symphony Unto Herself

Cellist Zoe Keating in a redwood grove near Occidental, Calif.
Jerry Dodrill

Zoe Keating's latest album is titled Into the Trees, and that's exactly where I have to go to meet her. She lives in the middle of a redwood forest, an hour and a half north of San Francisco. As Keating walks me around, we listen for her neighbors, the woodpeckers, who she says are extra-noisy in the evening.

It's fitting to find Keating in the middle of all this natural noise. In her studio, she creates a similar symphony of sounds, except she does it with just one instrument: her cello.

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9:51am

Tue September 6, 2011
Three Books...

What's In Store: 3 Tales Of A Terrifying Future

Originally published on Mon January 2, 2012 9:53 pm

iStockphoto.com

When I was a kid, I assumed that in the future things would get better and better until we were all driving flying cars and playing badminton with space aliens on top of 500-story buildings. Frankly, I kind of counted on this happening. But now I don't assume that we'll just keep going up anymore.

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3:55pm

Mon September 5, 2011
You Must Read This

In A High, Snowy World, A Quest For Self-Discovery

Being a seeker these days isn't easy. Our world wants us to be certain, whatever our views, and beyond that to be consumers — leaving little room for setting out in search of potentially important personal truths. Then, too, the notion of "seeking" got something of a bad name back in the '60s and '70s, when it became so entwined with drugs and pretend or misguided teachers.

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3:00pm

Mon September 5, 2011
World

Scuffles Interrupt Mubarak Trial

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, host: From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

In Egypt today, the trial of former President Hosni Mubarak resumed and, according to Egyptian officials, violence both outside and inside the courtroom left a dozen people injured. Witnesses testified for the first time during the daylong hearing. Today's focus: Who ordered police to fatally shoot about 850 protestors during the uprising against the former leader?

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3:00pm

Mon September 5, 2011
Opinion

'Housewives' Death Not Unprecedented

"The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills" returns for a second season tonight on Bravo. This was in doubt because one of the people on the show — the estranged husband of one of the housewives — recently committed suicide. Bravo has re-edited the first few episodes to take him out. But this isn't going to prompt the reality TV industry to take a hard look at its practices.

3:00pm

Mon September 5, 2011
Around the Nation

Summarizing Summer Sounds

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, host: It's Labor Day, the holiday that we treat as if it were the end of summer, and that's good enough for our purposes here today. Since Memorial Day, this program has been presenting a collection of sounds that evoke the idea of summer. So with the season over, it's time to summarize.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIEGEL: Our features served as a sonic evocation of all the pleasures and pains of the days of warm weather.

(SOUNDBITE OF THUNDER)

SIEGEL: The bang of thunder.

(SOUNDBITE OF ALASKAN LOONS)

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3:00pm

Mon September 5, 2011
Book Reviews

Book Review: 'Triple Crossing' By Sebastian Rotella:

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, host: From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

Sebastian Rotella has written about the complexities of the U.S.-Mexico border as a journalist. And with his new book, he returns to the subject through the lens of fiction. His novel, "Triple Crossing," is set on the border against the brutal backdrop of drug trafficking and government corruption.

Alan Cheuse has our review.

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3:00pm

Mon September 5, 2011
Africa

Assessing NATO's Mission In Libya

Lt. Gen. Charles Bouchard has been overseeing operations in Libya since they began in March. He talks about the lead up to the toppling of Moammar Gadhafi's regime last month, how the mission has changed now that the Transitional National Council is in power and whether NATO has any clues as to where Gadhafi may be.

3:00pm

Mon September 5, 2011

12:00pm

Mon September 5, 2011
The Record

Remix Breakdown: Turning Adele's 'Rolling In The Deep' Into A Summer Jam

Adele at the MTV Video Music Awards in August.
Jason Merritt Getty Images

"Rolling In The Deep" came out last November, not when summer jams usually get released, but Adele's monster hit didn't reach its peak popularity until the summer time. The song hit No. 1 on Billboard's Hot 100 chart in May, and stayed there for seven weeks straight.

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11:16am

Mon September 5, 2011
Monkey See

Bob Mondello's Fall Movie Preview: Thrills, Silence, And Harold And Kumar

Tin(pot) soldiers: John Cho, Neil Patrick Harris, and Kal Penn in A Very Harold & Kumar Christmas
Darren Michaels Warner Bros. Pictures

Deep breath ... summer blockbusters now officially a thing of the past, and I'm looking forward to quieter movies coming up.

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5:57pm

Sun September 4, 2011
Author Interviews

A 'Showdown' That Changed Football's Racial History

Jackie Robinson broke baseball's color barrier in 1947. But it wasn't until 1962 that the last NFL franchise integrated — the Washington Redskins.

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3:00pm

Sun September 4, 2011
NPR Story

Three-Minute Fiction: Round 7

We have our judge, we have our writing prompt and now we have our date. Round 7 of our exclusive Three-Minute-Fiction contest starts Saturday, September 10.

12:44pm

Sun September 4, 2011
The Picture Show

America's Asylums In Photographs

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:27 am

Straightjacket, Logansport State Hospital, Ind.
Christopher Payne

In the 19th century, the mentally ill were often sent to horrific asylums. Today they fill the nation's jails; the conditions aren't much better. Last year, almost 1.1 million people with serious mental illnesses were arrested nearly 2 million times.

It's those old asylums — mostly closed, often abandoned — that have fascinated photographer Christopher Payne. A few years ago, he put together a book of images from those buildings, titled Asylum: Inside The Closed World Of State Mental Hospitals.

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