All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-7pm and Weekends 5-6PM
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Jonese Franklin

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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6:21pm

Thu September 15, 2011
Economy

Coburn Agrees To A Deal On FAA Extension

Originally published on Thu September 15, 2011 9:39 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, host: From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

MICHELE NORRIS, host: And I'm Michele Norris.

Another partial shutdown of the Federal Aviation Administration has been averted. Its funding was set to expire tomorrow night. For the past two days, one senator had been blocking a bill to temporarily extend funding both to the FAA and highway projects, but instead, the bill is now headed to the president's desk.

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3:00pm

Thu September 15, 2011
NPR Story

Boehner Offers Response To Obama's Jobs Speech

House Speaker John Boehner ruled out tax increases and hammered at government regulations in his first lengthy response to President Obama's jobs speech last week.

3:00pm

Thu September 15, 2011
Around the Nation

Workers Start To Dismantle Dams In Olympic Peninsula

Work crews Thursday begin dismantling the two dams on the Elwha River, on Washington's Olympic Peninsula. By some measures, this is the largest dam-removal project ever — and, at 210 feet, one of the dams is certainly the tallest dam ever taken down. The process is an extremely tricky one — in terms of engineering, ecology and politics — but environmentalists hope this project heralds the beginning of the end of the age of big dams in the American West. Those who like big dams, for economic reasons, worry about the same thing.

7:00am

Thu September 15, 2011
You Must Read This

Our Basest Desires: The Cruel Chaos Of Revolution

promo

In 1985, when I was in the midst of a 12-year struggle to write my first novel, I had the good fortune to be invited to the Edna St. Vincent Millay Colony in Austerlitz, N.Y., for a monthlong residency. There, in the colony's curved-roof barn, I happened to pick up a paperback copy of Robert Stone's 1981 novel, A Flag for Sunrise.

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3:29pm

Wed September 14, 2011
Planet Money

The Economic Catastrophe That Germany Can't Forget

A one hundred thousand Mark banknote was an example of hyperinflation in the German Weimar Republic in February 1923.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

For troubled European countries, the European Central Bank could be like a giant ATM.

After all, the ECB has the unique ability to print unlimited amounts of euros. It could lend that money to the governments in need.

The problem with this idea? Europe's biggest economy hates it.

Cue inflation-fearing, deep-pocketed Germany. The thought of hitting up a central bank's ATM would send many Germans fleeing in panic.

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4:46pm

Tue September 13, 2011
Author Interviews

Patricia Marx Tells A Tale Of Sweet, Unbalanced Love

Here's a warning: if you start reading Patricia Marx's new novel in public, you might just find yourself snorting out loud — and with some explaining to do.

The book, Starting From Happy, is a sharp-edged love story told in 618 mini-chapters. It's sprinkled with Marx's quirky line drawings of origami instructions, pie charts, pasta shapes, and — for no apparent reason — a kumquat.

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4:14pm

Tue September 13, 2011
Movie Interviews

Ebert: A 'Life' Still Being Lived, And Fully

Originally published on Tue September 13, 2011 10:17 pm

Ebert, with Chaz Ebert, accepts a career-achievement award at the theater-owners' convention ShoWest in 2009.
Ethan Miller Getty Images

"I was born inside the movie of my life."

Those words open the new memoir Life Itself from the film critic Roger Ebert, who has made movies his life for more than four decades now. He and his sparring partner, the late Gene Siskel, had the most famous thumbs on television. Now, at age 69, Ebert depends on the same thumbs-up that he and Siskel made famous to help him communicate in daily life. Five years ago, after multiple cancer surgeries, he lost the ability to speak.

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3:16pm

Tue September 13, 2011
Monkey See

'Citizen Kane' At 70: Film School In A Box For The Serious Cinephile

Orson Welles takes the lead role in his film Citizen Kane, which has been released in a special 70th Anniversary Edition.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

It's time again for our movie critic Bob Mondello's latest home-viewing recommendation. This week, Bob takes a look at a 70th anniversary Blu-Ray release of what many call the greatest film of all time: Citizen Kane.

Tragic, demanding, controversial, larger-than-life, and a mystery even to those who knew him. That's newspaperman Charles Foster Kane, and those terms could also be applied to theater genius Orson Welles, who produced, directed, co-wrote, and starred in Citizen Kane when he was all of 25.

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3:00pm

Tue September 13, 2011
World

Taliban Fighters Attack U.S. Embassy In Kabul

Taliban fighters took up positions in a downtown Kabul building and opened fire on the U.S. embassy as well as other buildings in the neighborhood. Michele Norris talks to NPR's Quil Lawrence for more.

3:00pm

Tue September 13, 2011
Health

How Does The CDC Determine Vaccine Schedules?

Michele Norris speaks with Dr. Carol Baker, chair of the CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices and professor of pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine. She describes how the CDC determines the schedules for children's immunizations.

3:00pm

Tue September 13, 2011
Election 2012

Ohio Republicans React To Debate

In Chillicothe, Ohio, Robert Siegel spends the night with three Ross County GOP leaders as they watch and listen to the CNN- and Tea Party Express-sponsored presidential candidates' debate in Tampa. All three heavily favored Texas Gov. Rick Perry going into the debate and emerged unchanged. They like the entire field — and think it's way too soon for anyone to drop out. Their main disagreements were over Rep. Ron Paul's assessment of our military involvement abroad.

7:00am

Tue September 13, 2011
You Must Read This

In Wordless Imagery, An Immigrant's Timeless Tale

A few years ago, I had a work assignment in central Malaysia. When I returned home, I lamented to a friend that I was constantly lost, never knew if I had enough ringgits for a meal, and was unable to communicate with anyone. I felt like a confused child.

My friend laughed. "Now you know how your father felt when he arrived in this country," she said.

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4:20pm

Mon September 12, 2011
Theater

Broadway's 'Follies,' Sounding As Sumptuous As Ever

Dressy and juicy: Jan Maxwell plays socialite and former showgirl Phyllis Rogers Stone, one of four deeply unhappy characters at the show's center.
Joan Marcus

Make no mistake: With a cast of more than 40, Follies is a really big show. The legendary musical takes place on the stage of a Broadway theater, at a reunion of former showgirls, with a domestic drama unfolding in the present while the stage is literally filled with ghosts from the past.

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3:41pm

Mon September 12, 2011
Music Interviews

Bill Monroe: Celebrating The Father Of Bluegrass At 100

A poor, cross-eyed boy from Kentucky, Bill Monroe created the hard-driving, high-lonesome genre known as bluegrass.
Thomas S. England Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

Bill Monroe, known as the "Father of Bluegrass Music," was born 100 years ago this week in rural Kentucky. He influenced early country music and rock 'n' roll, as well as the hard-driving, high-lonesome genre he created — bluegrass.

William Smith Monroe was a man of few words, but he opened up to fellow bluegrass musician Alice Gerrard, who recorded him in 1969.

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3:00pm

Mon September 12, 2011
NPR Story

Possible Greek Default Worries European Politicians

Deepening concerns that debt-troubled Greece might default — and increasingly strident comments by several politicians in Germany about that possibility — helped send European markets sharply lower Monday. One German politician said it can't be ruled out that Greece might have to leave the eurozone. French banks — which are heavily exposed to Greek debt — were particularly hard hit Monday, with some leading banks down more than 10 percent.

3:00pm

Mon September 12, 2011
NPR Story

After Sept 12, Airport Security Tightened

Ten years ago — the day after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks — there was not a plane in the sky. Air travel was shut down. As it resumed over the course of the following days and months, security measures at the nations' airports were overhauled. Michele Norris talks with Matthew Wald, who covers transportation for the New York Times.

12:01am

Sat September 10, 2011
Three-Minute Fiction

Three-Minute Fiction Round 7: Arriving And Leaving

Danielle Evans is the author of "Before You Suffocate Your Own Fool Self."
Nina Subin

Weekends on All Things Considered has received hundreds of letters and posts on our Three-Minute Fiction Facebook page asking — actually demanding — the return of our fiction contest. So here it is: the beginning of Round 7 of Three-Minute Fiction.

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4:28pm

Fri September 9, 2011
The Two-Way

The Day Before America Was Interrupted: Nine People Recall Sept. 10, 2001

Rick King, who was assistant fire chief of Shanksville, Pa., on Sept. 11, 2001, stands near a cross made from steel from the World Trade Center, outside the fire station in Shanksville on July 14. He was one of nine people to tell NPR what Sept. 10 was like, the day before the horrible events of Sept. 11.
Gene J. Puskar AP

When Americans are asked what Sept. 10, 2001, was like, many call that Monday "normal" or "ordinary."

"Just a normal summer day," one man said.

That all changed on Sept. 11.

Nine individuals told All Things Considered where they were on Sept. 10. They talked about some of their serendipitous experiences, near misses or devastating turn of events of that day — the day before America was interrupted.

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3:00pm

Fri September 9, 2011
NPR Story

Australian Wins Surfing Competition

Australian Owen Wright won the first pro-surfing competition held in New York. Wright beat out Kelly Slater, a ten-time world champion surfer, for the $300,000 prize.

3:00pm

Fri September 9, 2011
NPR Story

Journalist Explores Perry's Electoral Successes

Scientists analyze patterns in all areas of life, from weather to health, to help predict outcomes. Journalist Sasha Issenberg examines how political scientists employed by the Texas gubernatorial campaign of Rick Perry in 2006 helped him strategize through testing random samples of voters. Robert Siegel talks with Issenberg about this approach — and how it shaped Perry's subsequent campaigns.

3:00pm

Fri September 9, 2011
Economy

Obama's Jobs Plan Versus GOP Rivals' Plans

President Obama and two of his GOP opponents in next year's election have laid out their ideas to turn the economy around. NPR's Scott Horsley joins Robert Siegel to compare and contrast the plans.

3:00pm

Fri September 9, 2011
Energy

How One Mistake Can Leave Millions Without Power

San Diego's power company has restored power to all of its customers. Thursday afternoon, more than 4 million people in the Southwestern U.S. and parts of Mexico lost electricity. Arizona Public Service Company says the outage occurred after an electrical worker mistakenly removed a piece of monitoring equipment at a substation in southwest Arizona.

3:00pm

Fri September 9, 2011
Economy

HUD Secretary Discusses Refinancing Plans

While President Obama's speech Thursday night focused on jobs, the president also touched on homeownership. The president talked about helping people refinance mortgages, in turn putting more money in families' pockets. Robert Siegel speaks with Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Shaun Donovan about what the president has in mind.

2:28pm

Fri September 9, 2011
Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001

In The Thick Of It: Sept. 11 From The Middle East

A Pakistani security guard sits on a chair amid the wreckage of the Marriott Hotel in Islamabad on Sept. 22, 2008, two days after a suicide bombing at the hotel.
Pedro Ugarte AFP/Getty Images

Michael Sullivan has covered foreign affairs for NPR, including earthquakes in India, Pakistan and Japan, volcanoes in Indonesia, and has been kidnapped by Somalis, Afghans, Haitians and the Tajik KGB.

On Sept. 11, I was in Islamabad. At the Marriott. Eating dinner in my hotel room while watching the news on CNN.

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1:52pm

Fri September 9, 2011
Music Interviews

Beirut: A Jet-Setter Settles Down

Beirut's latest album is The Rip Tide. Zach Condon, the band's leader, says the title was inspired by a real-life brush with a life-threatening ocean wave.
Kristianna Smith

Zach Condon says he was half-joking when he named his band Beirut: "I was kind of poking fun at myself," he says with a chuckle, "and some of my more exotic tastes in music at the time."

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11:43am

Fri September 9, 2011
Movie Reviews

Battles For Survival, Small-Scale And Huge

Tommy (Tom Hardy, left) and Brendan (Joel Edgerton) are battling brothers in Warrior — a domestic drama that feels surprisingly epic.
Chuck Zlotnick Lionsgate

Contagion is about a flu epidemic that causes millions of deaths, Warrior about sibling rivalry in a working-class family. The former is a disaster epic writ surprisingly small, the latter a domestic drama writ larger than you'd think. Both prove effective, both have intriguing structures; it's a good week for movie nuts.

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8:01pm

Thu September 8, 2011
NPR Story

A Recap Of Obama's Jobs Speech

Originally published on Thu September 8, 2011 8:01 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, host: From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

President Obama called on Congress tonight to stop the political circus and pass his plan, dubbed the American Jobs Act.

President BARACK OBAMA: There should be nothing controversial about this piece of legislation. Everything in here is the kind of proposal that's been supported by both Democrats and Republicans, including many who sit here tonight. And everything in this bill will be paid for - everything.

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8:01pm

Thu September 8, 2011
NPR Story

Schakowsky Discusses Obama's Speech

Originally published on Thu September 8, 2011 8:01 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, host: Joining us now is a Democrat, Jan Schakowsky, Democrat of Illinois, a member of the House Progressive Caucus, someone who's proposed her own jobs bill. Well, how did the president do?

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8:01pm

Thu September 8, 2011
NPR Story

Price Discusses Obama's Speech

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, host: Big question, of course, is how do Republicans in the House, where they are the majority, how did they react to the president's speech this evening. We're going to find out from one member of the House leadership right now. Congressman Tom Price of Georgia is chairman of the House Republican Policy Committee, and a member of the Budget Committee and the Ways and Means Committee. Welcome to the program once again.

Representative TOM PRICE: Thank you so much, Robert. Good to be with you.

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8:01pm

Thu September 8, 2011
Economy

Economists Discuss Obama's Jobs Speech

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, host: We've been hearing reactions to President Obama's jobs speech, which he made before a joint session of Congress. He started about an hour ago. Of course, he was done extremely early so that he could be done in time for the opening kickoff of the National Football League season. We'll have more on this subject.

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

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