All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-7pm and Weekends 5-6PM
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Jonese Franklin

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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2:53pm

Wed September 21, 2011
Music Interviews

Fountains Of Wayne: Transcending Time And Place

Fountains of Wayne's new album is Sky Full of Holes. Left to right: Adam Schlesinger, Jody Porter, Chris Collingwood, Brian Young.
Courtesy of the artist

Often, you only need to hear a few lines to know you're listening to a Fountains of Wayne song. "Richie and Ruben," from the new album Sky Full of Holes, introduces its title characters as the kind of hapless losers the band loves to write about: "They opened up a bar called Living Hell / Right from the start, it didn't go too well / They didn't have the vibe or quite the right clientele."

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3:27pm

Tue September 20, 2011
Monkey See

DVD Picks: 'Prime Suspect'

In the beginning, there were lapels: Helen Mirren's DI Jane Tennison, circa 1991.
Acorn Media

Time again for film critic Bob Mondello's recommendation for your home-viewing queue. This week, to prepare for the start of NBC's new TV series Prime Suspect, he suggests you look back at the original PBS series, starring Helen Mirren.

The year was 1991, and a new British police procedural had what then counted as a gimmick: Its star — smart, forceful, and assertive — was a woman, which was a big deal.

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3:00pm

Tue September 20, 2011
NPR Story

Air Force Lt. Talks About Coming Out To Colleagues

Air Force Lt. Josh Seefried was one of an untold number of American service members forced to conceal his sexual orientation under the military's "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy. Seefried talks with Lynn Neary about coming out to his colleagues Tuesday — following the policy's repeal — without fear of official repercussion.

2:55pm

Tue September 20, 2011
Music Reviews

Lucas Santtana: Bossa Nova With A Brand-New Beat

Lucas Santtana's new album is Sem Nostalgia.
Pedro Cupertino Courtesy of the artist

Lucas Santtana is a Brazilian artist who has been hiding in plain view for years. I came across a record by Santtana back in 1999, EletroBenDada, which updated the experimental and political pop music of the 1960s and '70s Brazilian Tropicalia movement for a new generation. I heard nothing more from Santtana for more than 10 years, but it turns out he's been busy making great music in Brazil, even if hasn't been making it up to North America. His latest record, Sem Nostalgia, has just been released in the U.S.

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4:50pm

Mon September 19, 2011
Country/Americana

Hank Williams III: Ghosts And Cattle Calls

From country and klezmer to doom-rock and metal, Hank 3's latest output is plenty diverse.
Tara Israel

Hank Williams III, also known as Hank 3, is the son of Hank Williams Jr., as well as the grandson of Hank Williams, considered to be one of the greatest country music performers of all time. Hank 3 got his start in music playing punk and metal, then went on to form bands with members of Pantera and The Jesus Lizard. Hank 3 made country albums, too, but had little use for mainstream Nashville's restrictive culture.

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3:37pm

Mon September 19, 2011
Television

With Premiere Week Upon Us, We Want To Ask Why

The spot: Simon Cowell at the Los Angeles taping of The X Factor, one of many new shows you may not be able to watch this week.
Ray Mickshaw FOX

This is a big, big week for broadcast TV — 44 returning series are having their season premieres, and 14 new shows will launch in the span of seven days.

But does running premiere week that way still make sense for the TV business. Or does it just create a traffic jam on your television?

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3:00pm

Mon September 19, 2011
NPR Story

Study: Thousands Of Immigrant Women Forced Into Marriage

A new study finds 3,000 cases of young immigrant women being forced into marriage — across 47 U.S. states — and it suggests the issue is dramatically underreported. Those who refuse can face threats of violence, ostracism from their families, and financial repercussions that can lead to homelessness. Yet, advocates say there is very little legal recourse in this country.

5:24pm

Sun September 18, 2011
Interviews

Ed Koch On Obama And Israel

Originally published on Sun September 18, 2011 5:24 pm

Former New York Mayor Ed Koch just sent a message to President Obama: Change your position on Israel, or face trouble with Jewish voters in 2012.

And he delivered that message at the ballot box in New York City.

Koch is a Democrat, but in last week's special election to replace U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner last week, Koch was a vocal supporter of Republican Bob Turner.

The reason, he tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz, is his unhappiness with the Obama administration's approach to Israel.

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4:38pm

Sun September 18, 2011
A Blog Supreme

Monterey Jazz Festival 2011: Fast Footwork And East Bay Voices

Terence Blanchard (left) and Kermit Ruffins perform in the An Afternoon In Treme revue at the 2011 Monterey Jazz Festival.
Craig Lovell Monterey Jazz Festival

The town of Monterey, California, has reinvented itself several times. It was once a capital city when California was Spanish territory, and even when Mexico became independent. It was an important fishing town, as chronicled in the novels of John Steinbeck. And these days, tourism helps drive the local economy, with attractions like a world-famous aquarium, world-class golf clubs nearby like Pebble Beach, and the world's oldest continuously-running jazz festival.

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3:00pm

Sun September 18, 2011
Around the Nation

Military Widows Use Adventure To Cope With Grief

Grief and extreme adventure typically don't go hand in hand. But for a group of military widows, the experiences came together recently at a retreat near Anchorage, Alaska, organized by the Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors.

1:54pm

Sun September 18, 2011
Author Interviews

American History, Seen Through A Shot Glass

When you order a couple of beers at your neighborhood bar, you're not just having a drink, you're taking part in a grand old tradition stretching back to the birth of our nation and beyond.

When the first British colonists began to wash up on our shores, the very first thing they built was usually a tavern.

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5:06pm

Sat September 17, 2011
Author Interviews

Errol Morris Looks For Truth Outside Photographs

Overgrazed Land. Pennington County, South Dakota (1936) is one of several photographs Arthur Rothstein took to document dry, sun-baked earth of the South Dakota Badlands.
Arthur Rothstein Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection

Errol Morris is regarded as one of the world's most important filmmakers and is best known for his documentaries The Thin Blue Line and the Oscar-award winning Fog of War.

But before he was a filmmaker, he was a detective and he's always been interested in uncovering the mysteries of photographs. In his new book, Believing Is Seeing, Morris focuses on the things you can't see in photographs and the importance of what lies outside the frame.

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4:35pm

Sat September 17, 2011
Music Interviews

Hanni El Khatib: Hoop Dreams

Hanni El Khatib's debut album is called Will the Guns Come Out.
Courtesy of the artist

Hanni El Khatib is a budding artist and avid skateboarder from the San Francisco area whose debut album, Will the Guns Come Out, comes out this month. If El Khatib's name sounds familiar, it's probably because his song "I Got a Thing" is being used in one of Nike's global ad campaigns as kind of a modern surf, skate and all-around shredding anthem.

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4:46pm

Fri September 16, 2011
Sports

A Celtic Cure: Soldiers Use Hurling To Heal After War

Originally published on Tue September 20, 2011 1:15 pm

The Barley House Wolves circle up around their coach, Ruairi O'Mahony, for a half-time huddle during a match against a hurling team from Worcester, Mass.
Shannon Mullen for NPR

One of the most popular sports in Ireland is the rough contact game of hurling.

It was created by ancient Celtic warriors, and now it's found a niche following among some soldiers in the U.S. A group of National Guardsmen in New Hampshire formed a hurling team to stay in shape after Middle East deployments.

But they're getting a lot more than exercise.

It's Like Stepping Off Of Battle

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3:00pm

Fri September 16, 2011
Around the Nation

Pa. May Change Electoral College Allocation Rules

Republican leaders in Pennsylvania's Legislature want to change how Electoral College votes in the state are allocated. Changing from a winner-takes-all system to a proportionate one based on congressional districts could help the GOP candidate gain a few extra votes in 2012. But the plan is controversial — even among Republicans.

3:00pm

Fri September 16, 2011
Commentary

Week In Politics: Special Election; Jobs

Melissa Block speaks with our regular political commentators E.J. Dionne, of the Washington Post and Brookings Institution, and David Brooks, of the New York Times.

1:32pm

Fri September 16, 2011
Music Interviews

John Hendricks: The Father Of Vocalese At 90

Jon Hendricks gives a clinic on vocalese at the 2007 Art of Jazz Festival.
Smaku via Flickr

Jon Hendricks turns 90 Friday. The singer and lyricist is best known for his work with Lambert, Hendricks and Ross in the 1950s, putting words to jazz — including insanely complex vocal arrangements of instrumental solos.

One of Hendricks' favorite anecdotes involves a party where the wives of composer Jerome Kern and lyricist Oscar Hammerstein II had a little dispute over who wrote "Old Man River."

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6:21pm

Thu September 15, 2011
Economy

Coburn Agrees To A Deal On FAA Extension

Originally published on Thu September 15, 2011 9:39 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, host: From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

MICHELE NORRIS, host: And I'm Michele Norris.

Another partial shutdown of the Federal Aviation Administration has been averted. Its funding was set to expire tomorrow night. For the past two days, one senator had been blocking a bill to temporarily extend funding both to the FAA and highway projects, but instead, the bill is now headed to the president's desk.

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3:00pm

Thu September 15, 2011
NPR Story

Boehner Offers Response To Obama's Jobs Speech

House Speaker John Boehner ruled out tax increases and hammered at government regulations in his first lengthy response to President Obama's jobs speech last week.

3:00pm

Thu September 15, 2011
Around the Nation

Workers Start To Dismantle Dams In Olympic Peninsula

Work crews Thursday begin dismantling the two dams on the Elwha River, on Washington's Olympic Peninsula. By some measures, this is the largest dam-removal project ever — and, at 210 feet, one of the dams is certainly the tallest dam ever taken down. The process is an extremely tricky one — in terms of engineering, ecology and politics — but environmentalists hope this project heralds the beginning of the end of the age of big dams in the American West. Those who like big dams, for economic reasons, worry about the same thing.

7:00am

Thu September 15, 2011
You Must Read This

Our Basest Desires: The Cruel Chaos Of Revolution

promo

In 1985, when I was in the midst of a 12-year struggle to write my first novel, I had the good fortune to be invited to the Edna St. Vincent Millay Colony in Austerlitz, N.Y., for a monthlong residency. There, in the colony's curved-roof barn, I happened to pick up a paperback copy of Robert Stone's 1981 novel, A Flag for Sunrise.

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3:29pm

Wed September 14, 2011
Planet Money

The Economic Catastrophe That Germany Can't Forget

A one hundred thousand Mark banknote was an example of hyperinflation in the German Weimar Republic in February 1923.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

For troubled European countries, the European Central Bank could be like a giant ATM.

After all, the ECB has the unique ability to print unlimited amounts of euros. It could lend that money to the governments in need.

The problem with this idea? Europe's biggest economy hates it.

Cue inflation-fearing, deep-pocketed Germany. The thought of hitting up a central bank's ATM would send many Germans fleeing in panic.

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4:46pm

Tue September 13, 2011
Author Interviews

Patricia Marx Tells A Tale Of Sweet, Unbalanced Love

Here's a warning: if you start reading Patricia Marx's new novel in public, you might just find yourself snorting out loud — and with some explaining to do.

The book, Starting From Happy, is a sharp-edged love story told in 618 mini-chapters. It's sprinkled with Marx's quirky line drawings of origami instructions, pie charts, pasta shapes, and — for no apparent reason — a kumquat.

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4:14pm

Tue September 13, 2011
Movie Interviews

Ebert: A 'Life' Still Being Lived, And Fully

Originally published on Tue September 13, 2011 10:17 pm

Ebert, with Chaz Ebert, accepts a career-achievement award at the theater-owners' convention ShoWest in 2009.
Ethan Miller Getty Images

"I was born inside the movie of my life."

Those words open the new memoir Life Itself from the film critic Roger Ebert, who has made movies his life for more than four decades now. He and his sparring partner, the late Gene Siskel, had the most famous thumbs on television. Now, at age 69, Ebert depends on the same thumbs-up that he and Siskel made famous to help him communicate in daily life. Five years ago, after multiple cancer surgeries, he lost the ability to speak.

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3:16pm

Tue September 13, 2011
Monkey See

'Citizen Kane' At 70: Film School In A Box For The Serious Cinephile

Orson Welles takes the lead role in his film Citizen Kane, which has been released in a special 70th Anniversary Edition.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

It's time again for our movie critic Bob Mondello's latest home-viewing recommendation. This week, Bob takes a look at a 70th anniversary Blu-Ray release of what many call the greatest film of all time: Citizen Kane.

Tragic, demanding, controversial, larger-than-life, and a mystery even to those who knew him. That's newspaperman Charles Foster Kane, and those terms could also be applied to theater genius Orson Welles, who produced, directed, co-wrote, and starred in Citizen Kane when he was all of 25.

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3:00pm

Tue September 13, 2011
World

Taliban Fighters Attack U.S. Embassy In Kabul

Taliban fighters took up positions in a downtown Kabul building and opened fire on the U.S. embassy as well as other buildings in the neighborhood. Michele Norris talks to NPR's Quil Lawrence for more.

3:00pm

Tue September 13, 2011
Health

How Does The CDC Determine Vaccine Schedules?

Michele Norris speaks with Dr. Carol Baker, chair of the CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices and professor of pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine. She describes how the CDC determines the schedules for children's immunizations.

3:00pm

Tue September 13, 2011
Election 2012

Ohio Republicans React To Debate

In Chillicothe, Ohio, Robert Siegel spends the night with three Ross County GOP leaders as they watch and listen to the CNN- and Tea Party Express-sponsored presidential candidates' debate in Tampa. All three heavily favored Texas Gov. Rick Perry going into the debate and emerged unchanged. They like the entire field — and think it's way too soon for anyone to drop out. Their main disagreements were over Rep. Ron Paul's assessment of our military involvement abroad.

7:00am

Tue September 13, 2011
You Must Read This

In Wordless Imagery, An Immigrant's Timeless Tale

A few years ago, I had a work assignment in central Malaysia. When I returned home, I lamented to a friend that I was constantly lost, never knew if I had enough ringgits for a meal, and was unable to communicate with anyone. I felt like a confused child.

My friend laughed. "Now you know how your father felt when he arrived in this country," she said.

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4:20pm

Mon September 12, 2011
Theater

Broadway's 'Follies,' Sounding As Sumptuous As Ever

Dressy and juicy: Jan Maxwell plays socialite and former showgirl Phyllis Rogers Stone, one of four deeply unhappy characters at the show's center.
Joan Marcus

Make no mistake: With a cast of more than 40, Follies is a really big show. The legendary musical takes place on the stage of a Broadway theater, at a reunion of former showgirls, with a domestic drama unfolding in the present while the stage is literally filled with ghosts from the past.

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