All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-7pm and Weekends 5-6PM
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Jonese Franklin

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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2:41pm

Sun October 9, 2011
Strange News

Florida Family's Antique Legacy: Pickled Cucumber

Originally published on Sun October 9, 2011 6:39 pm

James Boyle's great-great-grandmother bottled this pickle in 1876, and the family has been passing it down ever since.

James Boyle

Here's a partial list of things that happened in 1876:

It was, of course, the nation's 100th birthday. George Armstrong Custer met his fate at the Battle of Little Bighorn. Alexander Graham Bell made the first phone call. A giant squid, 18 feet long, washed up on a beach in Newfoundland.

And James Boyle's great-great-grandmother grew a very special cucumber in her Illinois garden. She put the sprouting vine in an old medicine bottle, so the cucumber grew inside it.

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1:10pm

Sun October 9, 2011
Author Interviews

Quest For The Holy Doughnut, And The First Dessert

OK, forget the vegetables. It's time for dessert.

And not just any dessert ... the oldest dessert in New York City. No, not those rock-hard doughnuts from the corner coffee cart. We're talking about the kinds of sweets people would have been eating 500, 1,000, even 2,000 years ago.

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3:30pm

Sat October 8, 2011
Author Interviews

Modern Horror Defined By Edgy Realism Of The 1970s

Jason Zinoman is a critic and reporter for The New York Times.

Earl Wilson

By the late 1960s, classic horror movies pioneered by Vincent Price and Boris Karloff had run out of steam. What took their place in the period after that was something different, edgier and altogether more terrifying.

"To some extent you could say that modern horror started with the Universal classics, but I do think there is this significant turning point starting in 1968," says Jason Zinoman, author of the new book Shock Value: How a Few Eccentric Outsiders Gave Us Nightmares, Conquered Hollywood, and Invented Modern Horror.

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5:09pm

Fri October 7, 2011
Electronic/Dance

A Relic From The Roots Of Electronic Music

The Oramics machine is the creation of Daphne Oram, the first director of the BBC's Radiophonic Workshop and a central figure in the evolution of electronic music.

Jennie Hills Courtesy of the Science Museum

"Forget everything you've ever known about synthesizers. This machine has no piano keyboard or anything like that. It looks like the sort of thing that a mad inventor would make in his shed."

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4:50pm

Fri October 7, 2011
Movies

Movie Review: 'The Ides of March'

A political thriller, The Ides of March, opens Friday. That's one week before the ides of October — and a few months before the first presidential primaries.

4:06pm

Fri October 7, 2011
Afghanistan

In Afghanistan, Performance Artist Packs Up His Bling

Aman Mojedidi, who grew up in Jacksonville, Fla., moved to Afghanistan in 2003 because he thought his homeland was finally on the mend. The guerrilla artist is also known as the Jihadi Gangsta, and he has provoked controversy and laughter with his work.

Courtesy of Aman Mojedidi

Performance artist Aman Mojedidi moved from the U.S. to Afghanistan in 2003, as one of what he says were many Afghan-Americans and Afghan-Europeans who thought their homeland was finally on the mend.

"It was really part of that wave of hyphenated Afghans and internationals wanting to come to Afghanistan, post-Taliban, [to] do something, rebuild, reconstruct, that kind of thing," he says.

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3:46pm

Fri October 7, 2011
Music Interviews

Seth MacFarlane: A 'Family Guy' With A Musical Mind

Seth MacFarlane, shown in Los Angeles last month, has released his debut album, Music Is Better Than Words.

Christopher Polk Getty Images

Seth MacFarlane, creator of the animated TV series Family Guy, The Cleveland Show and American Dad, is now releasing an album. It's called Music Is Better Than Words, and it's no joke.

"It's almost like you need the reverse of a Parental Advisory sticker," MacFarlane says. "It's just relaxed, great old music."

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3:10pm

Fri October 7, 2011
Around the Nation

John Wayne Fans Go On Pilgrimage For Memorabilia

Bill Atkins, 80, holds a blurry photo of himself at age 19 with John Wayne during the filming of Flying Leathernecks. Atkins came from Bowie, Md., to view the auction.

Courtesy of Shereen Marisol Meraji

John Wayne's family auctioned off hundreds of the actor's personal belongings this week at a hotel in Los Angeles. The items had been in storage since Wayne's death 32 years ago.

The display brought collectors and brokers and plenty of fans, who came from across the country to pay tribute to the Duke.

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6:32pm

Thu October 6, 2011
Television

'The League' Uses Fandom To Explore Friendship

From left to right: John Lajoie, Stephan Rannazzisi and Mark Duplass, from the first season of 'The League'. The new season airs Thursday, Oct. 6 on FX.

Patrick McElhenney FX Network

The stereotypical Fantasy Football fan is a 30-something suburban man-child. And the FX program The League is about their ilk. But even though fantasy football is what brings several friends together in the TV show, you don't have to be a fantasy football fan to enjoy it.

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5:04pm

Thu October 6, 2011
Books

Swedish Poet Wins Nobel Prize In Literature

Swedish poet Tomas Transtromer is this year's winner of the Nobel Prize in literature. Transtromer has been mentioned as a candidate for the award for years. His work often walks a line between concrete reality and dreams — he's worked as a psychologist and social worker in addition to his writing.

4:49pm

Thu October 6, 2011
Planet Money

Why 158 Acres Of Corn Costs $1.5 Million

Originally published on Fri October 7, 2011 11:16 am

Yours for $1.5 million.

Robert Smith NPR

I went looking for a bubble the other day. I'd heard that prices for American farmland were spiking – up thirty percent over the past year, and double what people were paying five or six years ago. It sounded like irrational exuberance.

I flew to Iowa, drove to the town of Colo, an hour north of Des Moines, and dropped in on a land auction. It was a great scene: A hushed crowd of farmers, an auctioneer with a voice made for opera, and a climactic duel between rival bidders, one of whom raised the price with a wink, the other with a slight nod.

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3:00pm

Thu October 6, 2011
Remembrances

Jobs Admirers Converge On Apple Stores

Across the world, admirers of Apple Computers are constructing impromptu shrines outside Apple Stores. Guy Raz hears from people in Santa Monica, Calif., and Washington, D.C., about what Apple means to them.

3:00pm

Thu October 6, 2011
Media

Nazaryan: Americans Don't Deserve Literature Nobel

Guy Raz, talks with Alexander Nazaryan about his rant in Salon.com, excoriating the American literary world. He explains that Americans don't deserve a Nobel Prize because their work is too interior. Nazaryan is on the editorial board of The New York Daily News.

2:13pm

Thu October 6, 2011
Music Interviews

Radiohead: Everything In Its Right Place

Thom Yorke at Radiohead's Sept. 28 concert at Roseland Ballroom in New York.

Kevin Mazur WireImage

Radiohead's first hit, "Creep," was everywhere in 1993. The band could have reacted as many other modern-rock acts did in the '90s: by repeating the same old sound, album after album, before fading into the background. Instead, the group made each record a reinvention, from the spare and haunting Kid A to In Rainbows, which sounded, well, sexy. It's all helped make Radiohead one of the most inventive and important bands in the world.

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7:50pm

Wed October 5, 2011
Election 2012

Palin Says She Won't Run For President

Originally published on Wed October 5, 2011 9:24 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Sarah Palin says she will not run for the 2012 GOP nomination for president. The former vice presidential nominee made the announcement on the syndicated Mark Levin radio show. For more, I'm joined by NPR's Don Gonyea. And, Don, what reasons did Palin give?

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3:26pm

Wed October 5, 2011
Monkey See

Do Rising Costs Have 'The Simpsons' On The Ropes?

The Simpsons is confronted with pressures that may require the voice cast to accept large pay cuts or face the possibility that the show won't continue at all.

FOX

The future of the The Simpsons hangs in the balance as negotiations continue between 20th Century Fox Television, which makes the animated series, and the actors who supply the characters voices. How does a TV classic that's been on the air a record 23 seasons find itself at death's door?

Well, the cartoon Simpsons aren't rich, but the real people who bring them to life sure are. Six main actors are responsible for everyone from Homer to Lisa to bartender Moe, and you won't believe how much each makes to do voices for these characters. Try $8 million a season.

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7:00am

Wed October 5, 2011
You Must Read This

Drunk On Words: A Literary Escape From Adolescence

Originally published on Wed October 12, 2011 6:27 pm

Remember reading, as a child, and feeling the fine mesh of words catch you up so completely that you became enjoyably muddled about which was the real world and which the world of the book? For me, it was as though I gulped down the language of the story and grew fat with its cadences — they rang in my ears, colored my vision and pulsed in my throat.

As I got older, I lost some of that easy susceptibility. What had once been a permeable membrane between fiction and life solidified.

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5:51pm

Tue October 4, 2011
Music

Authentic Egyptian Music Is From The Streets

An Egyptian man sits watching as others take part in a sit-in at Tahrir Square demanding further reforms in Cairo, on July 27, 2011, months after the country's revolution which brought down the government.

Khaled Desouki AFP/Getty Images

This summer I spent a month in Egypt doing research for the public radio program Afropop Worldwide. In October, Afropop will begin airing a series of programs looking at Egypt — past and present — through the eyes of musicians. In one episode Egyptians are asked to imagine how the revolution will affect their popular music?

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4:12pm

Tue October 4, 2011
Monkey See

DVD Picks: 'The Honeymooners'

Originally published on Tue October 4, 2011 6:52 pm

MPI Home Video

Time for our movie critic Bob Mondello to suggest something for home-viewing. Today, he's exploring a 15-disk collection of classic TV comedy that nobody's seen for a while: The Honeymooners: The Lost Episodes.

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3:52pm

Tue October 4, 2011
Opinion

Drafting My Fantasy Picks & Tackling Nobel Trends

The statue of Alfred Nobel resides at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. The 2011 Nobel Prize for Medicine, awarded by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, opened a week of Nobel honors.

Jonathan Nackstrand AFP/Getty Images

Commentator Dennis O'Toole is a writer and improv performer from Chicago.

Today, Saul Perlmutter, Brian Schmidt and Adam G. Riess won the Nobel Prize in Physics for discovering that expansion in the universe is speeding up. That's great news for me, since I had Riess and Perlmutter in my fantasy league.

Honestly, I could have gotten Schmidt too, but I drafted Nathan Seiberg, mainly because he's worked with both supersymmetric gauge theories and with discrete light-cone quantization. That was a hedge.

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4:28pm

Mon October 3, 2011
Monkey See

Comedian Samantha Bee Makes A Parenting Meal Of 'Eating Over The Sink'

Originally published on Tue October 4, 2011 11:09 am

Comedian Samantha Bee, seen here in April 2011, is writing about parenting at her new blog.

Jason Kempin Getty Images

A discussion on today's All Things Considered between host Guy Raz and comedian Samantha Bee begins with his noting that she has reduced parenting to the words "vomit" and "urine."

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2:57pm

Mon October 3, 2011
Music Reviews

Woody Guthrie's 'Note Of Hope' From Beyond The Grave

Woody Guthrie is the subject of a new tribute album, Note of Hope.

Robin Carson Courtesy of the Woody Guthrie Archives

When Woody Guthrie died in 1967, he left behind an enormous cache of unpublished lyrics and prose, which has resulted in an exceptionally rich posthumous career. Bob Dylan, who should know, has written of Guthrie: "He was so poetic and tough and rhythmic. There was so much intensity, and his voice was like a stiletto." Though I probably shouldn't admit it, I rarely listen to Woody Guthrie for pleasure.

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6:34pm

Sun October 2, 2011
NPR Story

NPR Names New CEO

NPR has named a new president and chief executive officer: Gary Knell, president and CEO of Sesame Workshop, the company that produces Sesame Street.

3:36pm

Sun October 2, 2011
Author Interviews

The Old Man And The Boat: Hemingway On The Pilar

Originally published on Sun October 2, 2011 6:37 pm

Ernest Hemingway (left) and his guide Carlos Gutierrez navigate Hemingway's boat, Pilar, in 1934.
Ernest Hemingway Photograph Collection, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum

In 1934, Ernest Hemingway was the reigning king of American letters. Just back from safari in Africa, where he'd shot rhinos and giant kudu, he seemed to be on top of the world.

The first thing he did after returning from safari was head to the Wheeler shipyard in Brooklyn, N.Y., and buy a 38-foot fishing boat he named Pilar.

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3:00pm

Sun October 2, 2011
Books

Three-Minute Fiction

The Three-Minute Fiction contest is over, but the fun is just beginning. We received 3,400 stories in Round 7 and our readers from Iowa Writer's Workshop and New York University are hard at work trying to get to them of all. NPR's Lynn Neary and Bob Mondello bring two of these stories to life: "Misshapen" by Aaron Maltz and "The Young and the Old" by Alex Swiatek.

2:00pm

Sun October 2, 2011
Television

TV's Fixation With 'The New Breed' Of '60s Women

Originally published on Mon October 3, 2011 9:13 am

The cast of ABC's Pan Am.
Bob D'Amico AP

The fall television season is in high gear, and there seems to be a barrage of tight skirts, panty-hosed legs and perfectly made-up faces making their way from the 1960s to the small screen.

On ABC is Pan Am, a show about airline stewardesses. There's also NBC's The Playboy Club, which following the stories of fictional bunnies in Hugh Hefner's nightclub. The networks are hoping to get on the nostalgia bandwagon after the success of Mad Men, AMC's period drama.

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1:15pm

Sun October 2, 2011
Science

When Scientists Fail, It's Time To Call In The Gamers

Proteins are incredibly complex, yet tiny — so tiny that conventional imaging techniques often can't capture them.
istockphoto.com

Researchers at the University of Washington were stumped. They were looking at a protein that causes AIDS in rhesus monkeys, but after 14 years of study, no one was able to figure out the protein's exact structure.

Researcher Firas Khatib tells Rachel Martin, host of weekends on All Things Considered, that even the most advanced imaging techniques couldn't capture this little particle.

"The reason that the problem is so hard is that proteins are so small you can't see them with a microscope," he says.

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9:22am

Sun October 2, 2011
Music Lists

World Music With A Latin Flavor

The Congolese street band Staff Benda Billi were discovered playing outside a zoo by a group of French filmmakers.
Courtesy of the artist

As he often does during weekends on All Things Considered, Betto Arcos visits the show this week to talk about some of the best new sounds he's been spinning on Global Village, his world music program on KPFK in Los Angeles. His picks this time around include a flamenco-jazz hybrid from Spain, joropo from Colombia, canchona from Washington, D.C. (by way of El Salvador), and a Cuban-inflected dance number from the Democratic Republic of Congo.

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3:00pm

Sat October 1, 2011
NPR Story

Week In News: Chris Christie For President? Still No

Originally published on Sat October 1, 2011 6:33 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, Host:

We're back with ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

(SOUNDBITE OF MONTAGE)

CHRIS CHRISTIE:

I'm 100 percent certain I'm not going to run. I don't want to run. I don't feel like I'm ready to run. First, you have to have in your heart, you got to want it more than anything else. More than anything else. I don't want it that badly.

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12:31pm

Sat October 1, 2011
Author Interviews

Zen And 'The Art of Fielding': Baseball As Life

iStockphoto

Chad Harbach's debut novel, The Art Of Fielding, is about baseball in the same way Moby-Dick is about whaling. Or in the same way Friday Night Lights is about football.

Which is to say, it is — and it isn't.

Harbach's protagonist, Henry Skrimshander, is a prodigal shortstop at a small, midwestern liberal arts college called Westish University. Henry is destined for the big leagues, until a debilitating mental slump lands him on the bench.

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