All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-7pm and Weekends 5-6PM
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Jonese Franklin

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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2:15pm

Wed October 26, 2011
Music

Tom Waits: A Desperate Voice For Desperate Times

Tom Waits has just released his latest album, Bad As Me.

Jesse Dylan

Tom Waits generally sings like a psychotic carnival barker or a drunken lounge crooner. And I really mean that as a compliment.

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12:32pm

Wed October 26, 2011
NPR News Investigations

Tribes Question Foster Group's Power And Influence

Originally published on Wed October 26, 2011 2:46 pm

Children at the Black Hills campus of the Children's Home Society head into the main building for lunch. The home caters to children with special needs, many of whom are Native American.

Laura Sullivan NPR

Part two of a three-part investigation

On a small crest deep in South Dakota's Black Hills, a dozen children jumped on sleds and floated across the snow. They are wards of the state, and this is their home: the western campus of the Children's Home Society.

There are rolling hills, a babbling brook — even a new school.

Children's Home Director Bill Colson says it's a place to help children who can't make it in regular foster homes.

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6:00pm

Tue October 25, 2011
Opinion

Autumn Raspberries: Worth The Tantalizing Wait

When it comes to fine-tasting fruit, the art of patience can't be underestimated.

istockphoto.com

In a hurry-up world, the garden keeps its own time. Old-fashioned plants like raspberries, asparagus and rhubarb ask us to slow down and wait for the sweet reward they offer. Commentator Julie Zickefoose revels in the waiting.

I have a friend who lives up in the mountains of North Carolina who loves to give me wonderful plants. Usually Connie gives me native prairie plants, and I plop them in the meadow, and it's no big deal. But this year she gave me raspberries. Not just any raspberries. Golden raspberries.

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3:00pm

Tue October 25, 2011
National Security

Cold War Bomb To Be Dismantled

The last B53 bomb is supposed to be dismantled Tuesday. Michele Norris speaks with Hans Kristensen from the Federation of American Scientists about the historical climate surrounding the B53 bomb.

3:00pm

Tue October 25, 2011
Science

Northern Lights Glow In Southern States

Melissa Block talks to Robert Moore of the University of West Georgia's physics department about a surprising display of the northern lights Monday night that went as far south as Mississippi, Arkansas and Georgia itself.

3:00pm

Tue October 25, 2011
Election 2012

Huntsman Shows Off Mandarin Skills

Throughout the presidential campaign, we'll bring you moments from the candidates. Monday night, Jon Huntsman showed off his often mentioned, but seldom demonstrated, knowledge of the Mandarin language on the Colbert Report.

3:00pm

Tue October 25, 2011
Education

ETS Says SAT Cheating Attempts Not Uncommon

Originally published on Tue October 25, 2011 6:06 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

MICHELE NORRIS, HOST:

And I'm Michele Norris. The company that administers the SAT says it catches hundreds of people a year trying to impersonate test-takers. Officials from the Educational Testing Service spoke at a New York state Senate hearing today, where lawmakers are investigating an alleged SAT cheating ring.

Charles Lane, of member station WSHU, reports.

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3:00pm

Tue October 25, 2011
National Security

Congress Recognizes First Black Marines

Nearly 70 years ago, the Marines became the last branch of the American military to accept blacks into their ranks. The first to serve at the segregated Marine base at Montford Point in North Carolina are relatively little known, compared to their fellow trail blazers in the Army's Buffalo Soldiers and the Air Force's Tuskegee Airmen — until now. Congress voted Tuesday to recognize the Montford Point Marines with the Congressional Gold Medal. Historian Melton McLaurin joins Michele Norris to discuss the black servicemen of the Montford Point Marines.

3:00pm

Tue October 25, 2011
Africa

Tunisia Announces Results Of Election

A supporter of Tunisia's Islamist Ennahda party celebrates on Tuesday at the party's headquarters in Tunis. Ennahda is leading the results of Tunisia's first free and democratic election — though is not expected to win an outright majority.

Fethi Belaid AFP/Getty Images

In Tunisia, a moderate, once-banned Islamist political party is on track to win the country's first free and democratic election — and the first among the countries of the Arab Spring. On Sunday, Tunisians elected a national assembly that will rewrite the country's constitution.

Despite the strong showing by the Islamists, no party is expected to get an absolute majority in the assembly and the new government will likely to be a coalition of secular and religious parties. And that, it appears, is what most Tunisians want.

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3:00pm

Tue October 25, 2011
Law

Police Arrested On Gun-Smuggling Charges

Five officers in the New York Police Department have been arrested on charges of smuggling guns, cigarettes and slot machines they thought were stolen. Three retired NYPD officers and a New Jersey corrections officer are also charged.

1:00pm

Tue October 25, 2011
The Record

Rocksmith: Guitar Hero Gets Real(er)

Paul Cross, creative director of Rocksmith, plays the game at a demonstration event in San Francisco, Calif.

Kimihiro Hoshino AFP/Getty Images

Music-based games like Rock Band and Guitar Hero, which let you play along to popular songs with fake instruments, once ruled the video game industry. They raked in billions of dollars in sales in 2008, when their popularity was at its peak. But such games have since lost their luster, and sales for both have plummeted. Now the French video game publisher and development company Ubisoft is hoping to revive interest in the video game genre by adding a new twist — the ability to use a real guitar.

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7:18am

Tue October 25, 2011
Opinion

Occupy Wall Street's Most Unlikely Ally: The Pope

Pope Benedict XVI rides in his popemobile through Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany, last month. The Vatican has released a document on world economics, condemning "idolatry of the market."

Thomas Niedermueller Getty Images

Thomas J. Reese is a senior fellow at the Woodstock Theological Center at Georgetown University, and a former editor of America, the national Catholic weekly magazine.

The Vatican released a document on the world economy on Monday that will cause heartburn in the Tea Party, but will be cheered by the folks occupying Wall Street.

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7:00am

Tue October 25, 2011
Opinion

My Accidental Masterpiece: The Phantom Tollbooth

Originally published on Thu November 10, 2011 7:32 pm

Norton Juster is the author of The Phantom Tollbooth.

"There was once a boy named Milo who didn't know what to do with himself — not just sometimes but always. When he was in school he longed to be out, and when he was out he longed to be in ... Nothing really interested him — least of all the things that should have."

It was, of course, the doldrums — his own special version of them.

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3:51pm

Mon October 24, 2011
Around the Nation

Families Broken Up As Immigrants Flee Alabama

Migrant worker advocate Lourdes Villanueva shows off the most popular playhouse at the Redlands Christian Migrant Association preschool in Mulberry, Fla. Despite the early arrival of kids from Alabama, the school can't open yet because it doesn't have enough money.

Scott Finn for NPR

Some immigrant families say Alabama's tough new immigration law is forcing them to split up, at least temporarily.

Every fall, migrant workers follow the tomato harvest south from Alabama to the Redlands Christian Migrant Association campus in Mulberry, Fla. It's an oasis of shady oak trees amid acres and acres of tomato fields.

But this year, women and children are showing up several weeks ahead of their husbands, who have stayed behind in Alabama to finish the tomato harvest. Other families who aren't migrant workers are showing up for the first time.

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3:47pm

Mon October 24, 2011
Music Interviews

Joe Henry's Raw, Raucous 'Reverie'

Originally published on Mon October 24, 2011 6:31 pm

Joe Henry's new album, Reverie, was self-produced and recorded in his basement studio.

Lauren Dukoff

When Joe Henry sets out to produce an album — and he's produced dozens, from the great soul singers Solomon Burke and Bettye LaVette to the actor and blues singer Hugh Laurie — he says he's looking for a point of view.

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3:21pm

Mon October 24, 2011
Pop

Coldplay's 'Mylo Xyloto' Has Mass Appeal

Coldplay's new album, Mylo Xyloto, is out this week.

Sarah Lee

In a music world commercially dominated by pop singers, rappers and country artists, Coldplay is one of the rare modern superstar acts that actually is a rock band. But for a group as patently inoffensive as Coldplay, it's earned an impressive number of "haters." Many rock fans dismiss its music as milquetoast, and even The New York Times once called Coldplay "the most insufferable band of the decade." Me?

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3:30pm

Sun October 23, 2011
Author Interviews

Products R Us: Are We 'Brandwashed'?

In an article for Fast Company magazine, Martin Lindstrom writes that Whole Foods places flowers by the store's entrance "to 'prime' us to think of freshness the moment we enter the store."

Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Martin Lindstrom got into the advertising business early on.

"I started up my own ad agency when I was 12 years old," he tells Guy Raz, host of weekend on All Things Considered. "I was a huge fan of Lego, so I built up my own Legoland in the backyard of my mom and dad's garden."

No one showed up on the first day, but Lindstrom persuaded a local ad agency to sponsor him. On the third day, he had 131 visitors.

The only problem? "Visitor number 130 and visitor 131 were the lawyers from Lego suing me."

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3:00pm

Sun October 23, 2011
World

Tunisians Vote In Free Elections

Tunisians voted Sunday in their country's first free elections — the culmination of a popular uprising that ousted President Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali and touched off the wave of Arab Spring uprisings. Washington Post reporter Leila Fadel offers her insight from the Tunisian capital, Tunis.

2:56pm

Sun October 23, 2011
Strange News

Was It A Cat I Saw? (Nope: It Was A Palindrome)

Originally published on Sun October 23, 2011 7:19 pm

Barry Duncan constructs a palindrome in a scene from Michael Rossi's documentary The Master Palindromist. "I happen to believe that I can change the world with reversibility," Duncan says.

Michael Rossi

Barry Duncan has an obsession that follows him everywhere he goes. "I see street signs, restaurant menus, objects while I'm walking along, and I'm just reversing them all the time," he tells Guy Raz, host of weekends on All Things Considered.

Duncan is a master palindromist. He creates phrases, sentences, even passages that read the same forward and backward. He's been at it since 1981, when he was working at a bookstore in Philadelphia and stumbled onto a book of wordplay.

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2:03pm

Sun October 23, 2011
Music Interviews

Jane's Addiction: Breaking With A Turbulent Past

Perry Farrell performs with Jane's Addiction. The reunited band's new album is called The Great Escape Artist.

Kyle Dean Reinford Courtesy of the artist

Jane's Addiction defined the Los Angeles rock scene of the late 1980s, and by the beginning of the next decade, the band had become famous worldwide. But almost as soon as they'd gained the world's attention, Jane's Addiction split up.

Modest reunions have taken place since then. This month, three of the four original members are back with a new album, The Great Escape Artist. Weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz, who grew up listening to Jane's Addiction, spoke to the group's leader, Perry Farrell.

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3:00pm

Sat October 22, 2011
From Our Listeners

Three-Minute Fiction: Closing In On A Winner

Transcript

GUY RAZ, host: It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

(SOUNDBITE OF CLOCK TICKING)

RAZ: All right. We're getting closer to finding the winning story in round seven of Three-Minute Fiction. That's our writing contest where we ask you to create an original short story that can be read in about three minutes.

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2:38pm

Sat October 22, 2011
Music News

How Franz Liszt Became The World's First Rock Star

Illustration of Franz Liszt. The Hungarian composer and pianist revolutionized the art of performance.

Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

When you think of rock n' roll, Franz Liszt might not be the first name that comes to mind. But the classical pianist, born 200 years ago today, was in many was the first rock star of all time.

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6:41pm

Fri October 21, 2011
Media

Murdoch Confronts Critics At News Corp. Meeting

Protesters demonstrate outside the News Corp. annual shareholder meeting at Fox Studios in Los Angeles on Friday.

Eric Thayer Getty Images

On Friday, News Corp. held its first shareholder meeting since a phone-hacking scandal in the U.K. led the company to close a major tabloid. Outside the meeting at Fox Studios in Los Angeles, about 100 demonstrators assembled to condemn the Murdochs and News Corp.'s leadership.

But the complaints that followed inside were far more specific. There was a vote to approve the board of directors, but it was largely a formality because the Murdoch family and its allies control so many voting shares.

Rupert Murdoch wasted little time in reminding investors of his track record.

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3:00pm

Fri October 21, 2011
NPR Story

New Camera Focuses Shot After It's Taken

Autofocus cameras hit the stores back in the 1970s, making it dramatically simpler for the average consumer to get a good shot. Later the digital camera made it possible for just about anyone to process their own pictures at home on a computer. Now comes a camera that could represent another kind of photography revolution: the light field camera. Take the picture, but focus it afterwards. Robert Siegel speaks with Lytro founder Ren Ng about the new light field camera that his company is producing.

3:00pm

Fri October 21, 2011
NPR Story

French Appear Unfazed By Financial Troubles

The French never let a crisis spoil a weekend — as you can tell. As the working week draws to a close in a cafe off the Champs-Elysee in Paris, there's a mood of keen anticipation. The wine's flowing with extra velocity. The French are preparing for two days of sports, food and family fun. They seem unperturbed by, or perhaps unaware of, the fact that their fate depends on what happens this weekend and the days that follow. If things go wrong, life won't be much fun any more.

3:00pm

Fri October 21, 2011
NPR Story

Why Has Gadhafi's Burial Been Delayed?

Libyan leaders debate what to do with the body of former dictator Moammar Gadhafi — amid calls from a U.N. commission for an investigation into the circumstances of his death Thursday. Melissa Block talks to NPR's Grant Clark for more.

3:00pm

Fri October 21, 2011
Politics

Roig-Franzia Discusses Questions About Rubio's Background

Robert Siegel speaks Washington Post reporter Manuel Roig-Franzia about Florida Republican Sen. Marco Rubio's background — and why it is being questioned.

3:00pm

Fri October 21, 2011
NPR Story

How Do Iraqis Feel About The Troop Withdrawal?

How do Iraqis feel about the U.S. decision to withdraw all its remaining troops by the end of this year? The issue of a residual American force to train the Iraqi military was hotly debated in Baghdad.

1:04pm

Fri October 21, 2011
Movie Reviews

High Anxieties Make For A Mad, Mad Movie World

Originally published on Fri October 21, 2011 9:42 pm

Here Bums The Bride: Lars von Trier's Melancholia centers on a newlywed (Kirsten Dunst) whose chronic depression leaves her singularly well-equipped to confront the end of the world.

Magnolia Pictures

In the space of a few weeks, Hollywood will give us four serious dramas about mentally unstable characters. It's a minitrend at best, and most likely coincidental. But it got me thinking about how filmmakers use narrative form to shake up audiences and put them in the same frame of mind as the characters they're watching.

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5:18pm

Thu October 20, 2011
Opinion

Goodbye, Gadhafi: A Dream Made Into Reality

A woman is overcome with emotion during celebrations outside the Libyan Embassy in London on Thursday, after the news that former Libyan leader Col. Moammar Gadhafi was killed after an assault on his hometown of Sirte.

Dan Kitwood Getty Images

Sarah Burshan is a student at the University of Illinois, Chicago.

Thursday, Oct. 20 is a day I will never forget.

My brother woke me up at 5 a.m. He kept repeating, "They got him, they caught Gadhafi!" I was so dazed, I didn't believe it. A world without Moammar Gadhafi? It seemed too good to be true.

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