All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-7pm and Weekends 5-6PM
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Jonese Franklin

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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4:22pm

Fri June 24, 2011
Music Interviews

Will Johnson, Man Of Many Bands, Embraces Discomfort

Will Johnson (second from right) with Centro-Matic. The band's new album is called Candidate Waltz.
Matt Pence

Will Johnson may be one of the hardest-working people in indie rock. He leads two bands, records as a solo artist and plays as a sideman in a host of other projects. Johnson is originally from Denton, Texas, and his music — be it the lonesome balladry of South San Gabriel or the rock 'n' roll machine that is Centro-Matic — is inspired by the distinctive sounds of that state.

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3:00pm

Fri June 24, 2011
Sports

U.S., Mexico Face Off For Regional Soccer Supremacy

About 90,000 people are expected to fill the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, Calif., Saturday, to watch the latest match in a long-running soccer rivalry: The United States against Mexico. They're meeting in the finals of the Gold Cup. Robert Siegel talks to sportswriter Stefan Fatsis for more.

3:00pm

Fri June 24, 2011
Politics

House Votes On Libya Resolutions

The House voted Friday on two resolutions dealing with NATO-led military operations in Libya. The first would have authorized U.S. operations for a year — that failed. The second would have placed severe funding limits on American involvement in the conflict — that failed too.

3:00pm

Fri June 24, 2011
Africa

Libyan Rebels, Loyalists Clash In Tunisia Border Town

Until several months ago, the Tunisian town of Djerba was a placid, sun-bleached stretch of the Mediterranean coast with white-washed hotels that catered mainly to vacationers from Europe.

But the Tunisian revolution that began last December scared away the foreign tourists. And now the fighting in Libya is spilling over the border and turning the town into a place of intrigue.

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3:00pm

Fri June 24, 2011
Commentary

Week In Politics: Deficit; GOP Presidential Field

Robert Siegel speaks with our regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Brookings Institution, and David Brooks of The New York Times.

3:00pm

Fri June 24, 2011
Politics

Obama Announces Partnership To Create Factory Jobs

President Obama announced a new manufacturing partnership Friday with businesses and universities. It's designed to make U.S. factories more competitive — and boost the number of good-paying factory jobs.

3:00pm

Fri June 24, 2011
Around the Nation

Souris River Continues To Inundate Minot, N.D.

In North Dakota, the Souris River has reached record levels faster than anyone had expected. Already, portions of Minot, N.D., are inundated, and it's only expected to get worse. Upstream of Minot, the town of Burlington has given up sandbagging efforts. Jerome Gruenberg, the town's mayor, has said, "We're no longer able to save the city." Robert Siegel speaks with Kim Fundingsland, writer for the Minot Daily News, about the latest on the catastrophic flooding.

1:34pm

Fri June 24, 2011
Movie Interviews

Tom Hanks Fights Cynicism With Cinema In 'Crowne'

Back To School: Tom Hanks plays a middle-aged man who reinvents himself by enrolling at his local college after he loses his longtime job at a big-box company.
Bruce Talamon Universal

In his long Hollywood career, Tom Hanks has often played the hopeful character — so his latest film, about reinvention amid recession, isn't much of a stretch.

It's called Larry Crowne and in it, Hanks plays the ever-optimistic Larry, a loyal employee of a big-box store whose life gets turned upside-down when he's unceremoniously downsized. Underwater on his mortgage and suddenly unemployed, Larry decides to reinvent himself by heading off to community college, where he falls in with a colorful group of scooter-riding students and even develops a crush on his teacher.

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4:08pm

Thu June 23, 2011
Around the Nation

A Squash's Journey: From The Shelf To The Hungry

Walmart store manager Emily Bowman notices some yellow squash with brown spots — and takes about 40 off the shelves and puts them on a donation cart.
Pam Fessler NPR

Americans waste an estimated 150 billion pounds of food a year. A lot of it comes from grocery stores and other retailers.

Food banks increasingly are trying to get their hands on some of that food to help feed the hungry.

The big challenge is time. It's a race to get the groceries off the shelves, and into the mouths of those who need it before it spoils.

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3:03pm

Thu June 23, 2011
Books

Pottermore Brings Harry Potter To The Digital World

Starting this fall, for the first time, the Harry Potter novels will be available as e-books.

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3:00pm

Thu June 23, 2011
Around the Nation

Bostonians Have Mixed Reactions To Bulger's Arrest

Reputed mob boss Whitey Bulger is legendary in South Boston. In the neighborhood where he reigned, some think it's about time the FBI caught up with him. Others, despite allegations that he committed 19 murders, say he's an elderly man who should be allowed to go on with his life. After 16 years on the run, Bulger remains a controversial figure in his hometown.

3:00pm

Thu June 23, 2011
Around the Nation

Legendary Mobster Hides In Plain Sight

For 15 years, authorities pursued the legendary crime boss James "Whitey" Bulger. When his capture was announced Thursday, it came to light that one of the most wanted men in America was living out a relatively public life in the upscale California community of Santa Monica. Robert Siegel talks with former U.S. marshal Victor Oboyski about how one goes about hiding in plain sight.

9:26pm

Wed June 22, 2011
Interviews

Analysis Of President Obama's Remarks

Michele Norris talks to NPR's Scott Horsley and other experts for their take on the president's plans to bring the 33,000 "surge" troops home by the summer of 2012.

4:53pm

Wed June 22, 2011
NPR Story

Grunting At Wimbledon

Michele Norris and Robert Siegel check in on complaints of grunting at Wimbledon.

4:25pm

Wed June 22, 2011
The Record

Following Claire Chase: A Week In The Life Of The Modern Freelance Musician

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:43 am

Melanie Burford

Claire Chase offered to send a helicopter to pick me up each morning during the seven days I followed her to produce this story.

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4:15pm

Wed June 22, 2011
Planet Money

Why We Tip

If you ask people why they tip, they'll say it's obvious. They tip for good service, of course. It's a reward for a job well done.

But a leading theory on tipping suggests that's not really why we do it.

Studies show that the size of the tip doesn't have much to do with the quality of service. The weather, how sunny it is, what kind of mood people are in, these factors matter just as much as how satisfied the customers are with the service they receive.

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4:55pm

Tue June 21, 2011
Music Interviews

Sachal Vasandani: A 'Nice Indian Kid' Learns To Sing Jazz

Sachal Vasandani's new album is called Hi-Fly.
Raj Naik

On his newest album, Hi-Fly, Sachal Vasandani pays tribute to jazz pioneers such as George Gershwin and Jon Hendricks, and also showcases some of his own music. A self-described "nice Indian kid from Chicago," Vasandani says his parents helped instill in him a love for jazz, but that they've always broadened his horizons, too.

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4:03pm

Tue June 21, 2011
Monkey See

DVD Picks: 'Cedar Rapids'

Fox Searchlight

Time now for our home-viewing segment — movie critic Bob Mondello's recommendations for film buffs who like to pop their own popcorn and pop in a DVD. This week, he's touting Cedar Rapids, a comedy that was just in theaters a few weeks ago.

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3:07pm

Tue June 21, 2011
Movies

The Horror Of War In The 'City Of Life And Death'

A scene from the film City of Life and Death, written and directed by Lu Chuan.
Kino International

Lu Chuan's film City of Life and Death lives up to its title. In documentary-like black and white, the writer/director shows the systematic murder of thousands of Chinese soldiers; some are machine gunned, some marched into the sea, some burned, some buried alive. Then the invaders turn to the civilian population and the process of killing continues.

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7:35am

Tue June 21, 2011
Monkey See

It's Emmy Season, And The Nominees Should Be...

Aziz Ansari stars as Tom Haverford on NBC's Parks And Recreation.
Chris Haston NBC

It's hard to imagine, at a time when we're mostly thinking about the beach and the next cycle of empty-headed summer TV fare like Jersey Shore. But the powers that be in Hollywood are selecting what will be hailed as the best examples of television excellence right now – voting on final nominees for the Emmy awards.

Ballots featuring potential nominees were posted online for Emmy academy voters last week; votes are due Friday. Which means most TV critics are making noise right now about who they'd like to see recognized.

Including me.

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6:06pm

Mon June 20, 2011
Education

In Detroit, Low-Performing Schools Get A Makeover

Michigan's governor announced a new reform program for Detroit schools Monday. The program creates a mini district for the city's lowest performing schools — and it works with university and private partners to improve schools and offer guaranteed college scholarships for city students. Detroit's long-troubled school system has been beset in recent years by financial mismanagement and declining enrollment. The district has already embarked on a plan to turn nearly half of its schools into charter schools.

4:54pm

Sun June 19, 2011
Education

Fact Is, Students Have Never Known History

In a recent nationwide test, only 20% of 4th graders tested 'proficient' in history. (GETTY IMAGES)
George Marks Getty Images

"The test called upon the students to identify at least two of the contributions to the political, economic, or social developments of the United States by such famous Americans as Lincoln, Jefferson, Jackson, and Theodore Roosevelt," an article in The New York Times reports. "Only 22 percent of American students had mastered enough history in their high school days to identify two contributions made by Lincoln to this country."

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4:36pm

Sun June 19, 2011
Author Interviews

How Gold Turned The Yukon Into The Wild West

Nineteenth-century prospectors pan for gold in the Klondike region of Canada's Yukon Territory.
Hulton Archive/Getty

More than a century ago, George Carmack stuck his arm into the frigid waters of Bonanza Creek in the Yukon Valley. What he came up with changed his life and many others: a gold nugget as big as his thumb.

After decades of searching, he was suddenly a rich man. And soon, the frozen, deserted Yukon was overrun. Hundreds of thousands of gold prospectors trekked to Alaska and Canada for the biggest gold strike in American history.

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12:43pm

Sun June 19, 2011
Music Interviews

Cults Leave Internet Hype Behind For The Big Time

Cults.
courtesy of the artist

Last year, Cults was just a couple of amateur musicians named Brian Oblivion and Madeline Follin. Then they uploaded their song, "Go Outside," onto a popular indie music website. The tune went viral and they became an instant indie success story. But no one knew who they were, where they were from, what they looked like or, for that matter, their real names.

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5:53pm

Sat June 18, 2011
Author Interviews

Hidden Gems And 'Killer Stuff': A Flea Market How-To

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Hidden Treasure How-To: Maureen Stanton offers 10 tips for finding valuable antiques and hidden flea market gems. Click here to see her suggestions.
iStockphoto.com

The flea market day start long before the crowds stream in, says author Maureen Stanton. And that's when the real deals go down.

"The dealers are here, sometimes right at the crack of dawn," Stanton tells NPR's Laura Sullivan. "The antique dealers, generally, are 'picking' the other tables ... looking for the thing that they can resell for double or triple or 10-fold."

Stanton has written a new book about this growing subculture, Killer Stuff and Tons of Money: Seeking History and Hidden Gems in Flea-Market America.

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3:00pm

Sat June 18, 2011
NPR Story

Week In News: GOP Debate, Riot Kiss

At least seven Republicans have joined the presidential race, and a couple of others seem almost ready to jump. Guest host Laura Sullivan talks with James Fallows, national correspondent with The Atlantic, about this past week's GOP debate, about possible candidate Jon Huntsman's puzzling ad campaign and about the kiss seen around the world between two fans caught in a hockey riot.

1:44pm

Sat June 18, 2011
Music Interviews

Jill Scott: Act The Part

Jill Scott's latest album is called The Light of the Sun.
Courtesy of the artist

When Jill Scott came on the music scene a little more than a decade ago, she wanted to let the world know who she was — so much so that she named her debut album Who Is Jill Scott? Since then, the Philadelphia native has won three Grammys, sold 5 million records worldwide, and starred in a number of movies and TV shows — from the Tyler Perry film Why Did I Get Married? to the HBO series The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency.

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4:38pm

Fri June 17, 2011
Planet Money

The FBI Agent Who Became A Black-Market Mogul

Keith Mularski doesn't look like someone with a lot of secrets. He has this aw-shucks demeanor, like an overgrown kid in a business suit.

But back in 2005, his first assignment with the cybercrime division at the FBI was to hang out on the underground sites where stolen credit cards are bought and sold. By 2006, he would be running one of the biggest underground sites on the Internet.

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3:22pm

Fri June 17, 2011
Music Interviews

'The Death Of Klinghoffer' Returns To Face The Music

Brian Mulligan as Leon Klinghoffer and Nancy Maultsby as Marilyn Klinghoffer in the 2011 Opera Theatre of Saint Louis production of The Death of Klinghoffer.
Ken Howard, 2011 courtesy of Opera Theatre of St. Louis

It's been nearly 20 years since the John Adams/Alice Goodman/Peter Sellars/Mark Morris opera The Death of Klinghoffer has been given a full U.S. stage production; the last was in San Francisco in 1992. Perhaps that should come as no surprise, given the rancor stirred by its 1991 American premiere at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. But it's back at Opera Theater of St. Louis for the next week. Its revival has tried to address some of the issues and concerns raised by the controversial premiere.

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3:00pm

Thu June 16, 2011
Around the Nation

Ranger Discusses Mount McKinley Rescue

Last week on Mount McKinley, ranger Tucker Chenoweth had a day unlike any other. Over the course of one day, he helped rescue three different climbers. That is as many as he often has in one season. Melissa Block speaks with Chenoweth about those rescues.

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