All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-7pm and Weekends 5-6PM
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Jonese Franklin

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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3:00pm

Mon July 4, 2011
NPR Story

Fire-Ravaged Southwest Prepares For Rainy Season

Teams of firefighters and disaster management officials are going into already-burned areas of the Southwest to figure out how to prevent flooding now that the rainy season is beginning. They're looking for debris that's blocking streams — and for areas now devoid of trees that held together the soil.

3:00pm

Mon July 4, 2011
Music

Steve Martin Talks About His Fourth Of July Song

Michele Norris talks with Steve Martin about his Fourth of July song, "Me & Paul Revere," sung from the point of view of the horse. He will perform it live on "A Capitol Fourth" — and for Michele.

3:00pm

Mon July 4, 2011
Politics

GOP Candidates Stump On The Fourth Of July

Originally published on Wed August 24, 2011 11:51 am

Transcript

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

From NPR News, it's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Michele Norris.

On this Independence Day, most of the nation gets to take the day off work, but not the Republican presidential candidates. Today, they were hard at work, marching in parades, shaking hands at barbeques and showing off the red, white and blue.

They stuck mostly to the states with the earliest voting contests - Iowa and New Hampshire - as NPR's Robert Smith reports.

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3:00pm

Mon July 4, 2011
NPR Story

Letters: Lorenzo Charles

Michele Norris reads letters from listeners.

3:00pm

Mon July 4, 2011
NPR Story

Fewer People Participate In Civil War Reenactments

Recently there's been a little more interest than usual in the Civil War, owing to the 150th anniversary of the historic event. Even so, fewer people are donning Union and Confederate gear and participating in historical reenactments. And as those who have been re-enacting for decades retire from the battlefields, many wonder who will take their place.

3:00pm

Mon July 4, 2011
NPR Story

Chavez Returns To Venezuela

Just when Venezuelans were talking about President Hugo Chavez's future and thinking about what lies ahead if he doesn't run for reelection, Chavez returned to Caracas after cancer surgery in Cuba. Michele Norris talks with NPR's Juan Forero.

3:00pm

Mon July 4, 2011
NPR Story

In Libya, Regional Divide Mirrors Disparities

In Libya, many supporters of Moammar Gadhafi say the leader has used the country's oil money to provide real benefits to the people, including subsidized housing, free health care and education. Critics say those benefits were unequally distributed, with favored groups around Tripoli and the western part of the country getting the lion's share — and those in the east, around Benghazi, getting the least. They say the country's political divide mirrors an economic one.

3:00pm

Mon July 4, 2011
NPR Story

Summer Sounds: Firecrackers

Listener Bev Brown of Georgetown, Texas, tells us about her Summer Sound. Growing up on the plains of southeastern South Dakota, Brown says her father was the Fireworks Man. Every Fourth of July of her childhood, her dad planned and "shot" the Sioux Falls municipal fireworks show.

3:00pm

Mon July 4, 2011
NPR Story

Do America's Changing Demographics Impact Politics?

Michele Norris talks with Ron Brownstein of National Journal about how the changing U.S. demographics are shifting the political landscape for 2012.

11:03am

Mon July 4, 2011
The Baby Project

Naming Trends And How Parents-To-Be Face 'Baby-Name Hostility'

iStockphoto.com

When people find out they're expecting, choosing a name for their baby can be one of their most stressful tasks.

Part of that stress is because there has been a "baby-naming revolution" over the last half-century, says Laura Wattenberg, who wrote The Baby Name Wizard: A Magical Method for Finding the Perfect Name for Your Baby.

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4:28pm

Sun July 3, 2011
Economy

Debt Showdown: Road To Another Financial Disaster?

Aug. 2: the day of debt reckoning. According to President Obama, the U.S. will default on its obligations that day if Congress does not raise the debt ceiling. With this debt-ocalypse just under a month away, one begins to think about what would happen if Americans wake up that morning to find Congress still deadlocked.

Annie Lowrey, business reporter for Slate, imagines a worst-case scenario.

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3:00pm

Sun July 3, 2011
Business

CEO Salaries Continues To Rise

The economy is still on the road to recovery, but CEOs seem to be doing just fine. A new study reveals the median pay for a CEO at a top-200 company last year was $10.8 million, up 23 percent in just a year. P.J. Joshi of The New York Times discusses why CEOs get the ever-bigger bucks while most workers are barely staying even.

5:06pm

Sat July 2, 2011
Music Interviews

No Flow? Rap Rebirth Can Help

Jesse Kramer, 24, writes made-to-order rhymes for customers of his website, Rap Rebirth.
Courtesy of Jesse Kramer

If your flow has lost its get-up-and-go, you may need to call Jesse Kramer.

The 24-year-old runs a website called Rap Rebirth, where, for a fee, he offers custom rap lyrics in any style you chose — anywhere from a verse to an entire album. Kramer tells Weekend All Things Considered host Guy Raz that a wide range of artists use his services.

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4:27pm

Sat July 2, 2011
Author Interviews

In Race To South Pole, Scott Lost ... Or Did He?

A member of the Terra Nova Expedition (or British Antarctic Exploration team) travels by dogsled in front of a weathered iceberg, circa 1910 or 1911.
Herbert George Ponting The Library of Congress

The early 20th century was the heroic age of Antarctic exploration. Teams of explorers from multiple countries were fighting to be the first to reach the South Pole.

The man who would ultimately get there first — in December 1911 — was the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen. He went with a small team and a pack of sled dogs. At the time it was seen as humiliating defeat for Britain and its team led by Robert Falcon Scott.

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2:51pm

Sat July 2, 2011
Music Interviews

The Golden Years Of Nigerian Boogie

Art from the cover of Brand New Wayo: Funk, Fast Times and Nigerian Boogie Badness 1979-1983.
Courtesy of Comb & Razor Sound

Between 1979 and 1983, Nigeria experienced a handful of watershed moments: an oil boom, the return of democracy after years of military dictatorship, and a lot of money flooding into the country. Creative industries — music in particular — responded in kind, and suddenly Nigeria was the right place to be at the right time for musicians all over Africa.

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12:00pm

Sat July 2, 2011
Music Lists

'Global Village' Picks Latin Classics, Reinvented

Mexican singer Magos Herrera mixes bolero and jazz in "Luz de Luna."
Courtesy of the artist

As he does every so often, Betto Arcos joins Weekend All Things Considered host Guy Raz to discuss some of the music he's been spinning on his KPFK world music program Global Village. This week, Arcos offers a handful of modern artists who have mined the long, intercontinental history of Latin music for source material and inspiration.

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3:00pm

Fri July 1, 2011
Around the Nation

Summer Sounds: Steel Drums

Lila Sheon, 14, lives in a diverse part of Washington, D.C., called Petworth. Her contribution to our Summer Sounds series comes from a steel drum band practicing on the street.

3:00pm

Fri July 1, 2011
Africa

Morocco Votes On Political Reforms Referendum

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

Morocco's government says voters there have overwhelmingly passed a series of constitutional reforms which will set new limits on the power of the monarchy. The landslide result was widely expected. As we reported, the reforms would keep Morocco's king as the head of state and ]the military, but the head of government would be a prime minister chosen from the largest party elected to the parliament. Members of the opposition say the changes don't go far enough and are vowing to continue their protests.

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3:00pm

Fri July 1, 2011
NPR Story

Minnesota Government Grinds To A Halt

Thousands of state workers had an unscheduled day off in Minnesota Friday. Many functions of state government are on hold after the Legislature and Gov. Mark Dayton failed to reach agreement on a budget for the fiscal year that began Friday.

3:00pm

Fri July 1, 2011
NPR Story

Week In Politics: Budget; Debt Ceiling

Melissa Block speaks with our regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of the Washington Post and Brookings Institution, and David Brooks of the New York Times. They discuss the latest on the budget and debt ceiling discussions.

3:00pm

Fri July 1, 2011
NPR Story

Is San Francisco Driving Its Families Away?

Census data confirms what many San Francisco lawmakers and policy wonks know: The city is bleeding families. San Francisco has about 5,000 fewer children than 10 years ago, despite the city's reputation for being among the most family-friendly in the country. The culprit: the cost of housing.

3:00pm

Fri July 1, 2011
NPR Story

How To Cook Perfect Corn

Melissa Block gets the run down on how to cook perfect corn from Betty Fussell, author of The Story of Corn. Fussell is also a descendant of Nebraskan corn farmers.

3:00pm

Fri July 1, 2011
NPR Story

Strauss-Kahn Released Without Bail

Former International Monetary Fund chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn was released without bail Friday after questions arose about the credibility of a woman accusing him of sexual assault.

3:00pm

Fri July 1, 2011
NPR Story

Teachers Across The Country Face Layoffs

Teacher contracts expire in many places Friday, and for many teachers, those contracts won't be picked back up. State budget deficits and increased cuts are taking their toll on school districts around the country. In Milwaukee, 354 teachers are going to be laid off. In Chicago, a thousand. Smaller school districts are losing positions too. Robert Siegel speaks with Sean Cavanagh, who covers state education policy for Education Week, about the cuts — and what they mean for the upcoming school year.

3:00pm

Fri July 1, 2011
NPR Story

The Father Of Modern Criminology Profiled In New Book

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

It takes a thief to catch a thief, and no one illustrates that adage better than Eugene-Francois Vidocq, a man who was immensely famous in 19th-century France.

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3:00pm

Fri July 1, 2011
NPR Story

College Basketball Legend Lorenzo Charles Dies

Robert Siegel speaks with Dereck Whittenburg about the death of Lorenzo Charles, a member of the NC State Wolfpack who made the 1983 NCAA national title-winning dunk. They were the underdogs to the No. 1 Houston Cougars — also known then as Phi Slamma Jamma — a team that included future NBA greats Hakeem Olajuwon and Clyde Drexler. Whittenburg threw the ball that Charles grabbed and dunked in the last seconds of the game, upsetting Houston and giving NC State the stunning win.

3:00pm

Fri July 1, 2011
NPR Story

Sex Crimes Prosecutor Discusses Strauss-Kahn Case

For more on the Dominique Strauss-Kahn case, Melissa Block talks with Kristina Korobov about the credibility of alleged victims — and how it can be used in court. Korobov is the senior attorney for the National Center for the Prosecution of Violence Against Women, a division of the National District Attorneys Association.

3:00pm

Fri July 1, 2011
NPR Story

Letters: 'The Tree Of Life'

Robert Siegel and Melissa Block read letters from listeners.

12:52pm

Fri July 1, 2011
Beginnings: Pregnancy, Childbirth and Beyond

In China, An IVF Clinic Grapples With Huge Demand

Dr Weipeng Zhao heads the increasingly popular Shanghai Ji Ai Genetics and IVF Institute.
Courtesy of Xu Yongming

At 8:30 in the morning, a line weaves through the lobby and out the front door of the Shanghai Ji Ai Genetics and IVF Institute. Next to the lobby, people crowd into a waiting room, which looks and sounds as much like a train station as it does a medical office. There's an electronic board on the wall, but instead of destinations and times, it flashes names of patients, telling them which room to go to and which doctor to see.

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4:36pm

Thu June 30, 2011
The Two-Way

Love It Or Hate It: Few Are In Between About 'Tree Of Life'

Part creation epic and part family drama, The Tree of Life stars Jessica Chastain and Brad Pitt as the parents of three boys in the '50s.
Merie Wallace Fox Searchlight Pictures

What is it about The Tree of Life, director Terrence Malick's movie that Fresh Air reviewer David Edelstein says is "part creation epic, part Oedipal family drama," that has a small number of confused and sometimes angry theater-goers walking out early around the nation?

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