All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-7pm and Weekends 5-6PM
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Jonese Franklin

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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12:00pm

Mon September 5, 2011
The Record

Remix Breakdown: Turning Adele's 'Rolling In The Deep' Into A Summer Jam

Adele at the MTV Video Music Awards in August.
Jason Merritt Getty Images

"Rolling In The Deep" came out last November, not when summer jams usually get released, but Adele's monster hit didn't reach its peak popularity until the summer time. The song hit No. 1 on Billboard's Hot 100 chart in May, and stayed there for seven weeks straight.

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11:16am

Mon September 5, 2011
Monkey See

Bob Mondello's Fall Movie Preview: Thrills, Silence, And Harold And Kumar

Tin(pot) soldiers: John Cho, Neil Patrick Harris, and Kal Penn in A Very Harold & Kumar Christmas
Darren Michaels Warner Bros. Pictures

Deep breath ... summer blockbusters now officially a thing of the past, and I'm looking forward to quieter movies coming up.

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5:57pm

Sun September 4, 2011
Author Interviews

A 'Showdown' That Changed Football's Racial History

Jackie Robinson broke baseball's color barrier in 1947. But it wasn't until 1962 that the last NFL franchise integrated — the Washington Redskins.

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3:00pm

Sun September 4, 2011
NPR Story

Three-Minute Fiction: Round 7

We have our judge, we have our writing prompt and now we have our date. Round 7 of our exclusive Three-Minute-Fiction contest starts Saturday, September 10.

12:44pm

Sun September 4, 2011
The Picture Show

America's Asylums In Photographs

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:27 am

Straightjacket, Logansport State Hospital, Ind.
Christopher Payne

In the 19th century, the mentally ill were often sent to horrific asylums. Today they fill the nation's jails; the conditions aren't much better. Last year, almost 1.1 million people with serious mental illnesses were arrested nearly 2 million times.

It's those old asylums — mostly closed, often abandoned — that have fascinated photographer Christopher Payne. A few years ago, he put together a book of images from those buildings, titled Asylum: Inside The Closed World Of State Mental Hospitals.

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12:42pm

Sun September 4, 2011
Art & Design

Dream Weaver: This Guy's Quilts ROCK!

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:27 am

Artist Ben Venom makes quilts using vintage heavy metal T-shirts.
Ben Venom

If you were a metal-head in a past life, you probably have a collection of concert t-shirts stashed away somewhere.

Maybe you use that prized souvenir from Pantera's Cowboys From Hell tour to polish your vintage 1981 Pontiac Firebird.

A San Francisco artist who goes by the name Ben Venom has come up with an unusual use for those old heavy metal shirts — he sews them into quilts.

And the results are on exhibit in galleries in the Bay Area and Birmingham, England.

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8:33am

Sun September 4, 2011
Music Interviews

Thomas Dybdahl: Norwegian Invasion

Thomas Dybdahl's first U.S. release, Songs, collects music from the Norweigian songwriter's hit-heavy career overseas.
Kevin Westenberg Courtesy of the artist

In his home country of Norway, Thomas Dybdahl is already a star. The singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist has released five well-received albums there over the past decade.

Now, he's making his U.S. debut with Songs, a sort of compilation of the best of his Norwegian hits. One thing that's making the transition easy: His songs are all in English.

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3:47pm

Sat September 3, 2011
Theater

A Son Confronts Moscone's 'Ghost' On Stage

In Ghost Light, a director deals with his father's death while staging a version of Hamlet.
Jenny Graham Oregon Shakespeare Festival

As the artistic director of the California Shakespeare Theater, Jonathan Moscone has told a lot of stories on stage but never his own father's — until now.

Moscone was 14 when his father, San Francisco Mayor George Moscone, was murdered.

For decades, the younger Moscone saw a legend grow up around city supervisor Harvey Milk, who was also gunned down that day. Milk became a gay rights icon, and his story became the subject of plays, documentaries and films. Moscone's story, however, remained largely untold.

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3:38pm

Sat September 3, 2011
Television

Alton Brown Takes A Final Bite Of 'Good Eats'

Good Eats isn't your typical cooking show. Its host and creator, Alton Brown, does more than just recite recipes.

He's as often in front of a blackboard as he is in front of an oven. Brown uses quirky skits, puppets and props to serve up the history and science of food — and the secrets of simple great eating.

Good Eats has a large, loyal following of fans and they're all about to be very disappointed. The show taped the final episode this week after 13 years of being on-air.

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3:38pm

Sat September 3, 2011
Politics

SuperPACS, Explained (By Stephen Colbert's Lawyer)

Comedian Stephen Colbert, left, confers with his attorney Trevor Potter, center, as Matthew Sanderson looks on at right, as they appeared before the Federal Election Committee (FEC) in Washington. Potter says Colbert's SuperPAC, "Americans For A Better Tomorrow, Tomorrow," is no joke. (Cliff Owen/AP)
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Trevor Potter is a Washington lawyer with the firm Caplin and Drysdale. He also served as chair of the Federal Election Commission.

And he says Stephen Colbert is not joking.

At least when it comes to the comedian's SuperPAC, a political action committee authorized by the FEC to make "unlimited independent expenditures." Colbert's is called "Americans For A Better Tomorrow, Tomorrow."

Colbert didn't get it without help. He hired Potter to submit the paperwork and coach him on his FEC hearing.

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3:06pm

Sat September 3, 2011
Music News

Glen Campbell: Forget Me Not

Legendary country singer Glen Campbell's new album, Ghost on the Canvas, will be his last. Campbell is suffering the early stages of Alzheimer's, and he's decided to release one more record as a final farewell.
Collin Stark Courtesy of the artist

In his new album's liner notes, Glen Campbell writes, "Ghost on the Canvas is the last studio record of new songs that I ever plan to make."

That's because he's now living through the early stages of Alzheimer's. A man whose music history spans six decades is slowly losing his own history — his memories of being one of L.A.'s top session guitarists, playing on everything from "Strangers in the Night" to "Good Vibrations," with an outfit called The Wrecking Crew.

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1:49pm

Sat September 3, 2011
Author Interviews

The Inside Track On New York's High Line

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:28 am

The High Line's Wildflower Field stretches from New York City's West 27th Street to West 29th Street and is made up of native plant species that once grew on the unused High Line as well as new species that bloom throughout the growing season.
Iwan Baan

In August 1999, Joshua David walked into a community board meeting in New York City's Chelsea neighborhood.

People were debating what to do with an old, elevated rail track that ran through the neighborhood between Gansevoort and 34 Street. It had been abandoned since 1980. Before that, it was built to haul goods into the city's meatpacking district.

David thought it was kind of a cool old relic, and he thought other people would feel the same.

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12:00pm

Sat September 3, 2011
Music News

The Clown Of The Orchestra Takes Its Revenge

The Breaking Winds achieved viral fame last year with a Lady Gaga medley video.
Kate Lemmon

You might think you haven't heard the bassoon outside a concert hall before, but you have: The woodwind instrument features prominently in the theme music of Leave It To Beaver, represents the grandfather character in Peter and the Wolf, and scores Mickey Mouse's misadventure with the dancing broomsticks in Fantasia. Notice a trend there?

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6:06pm

Fri September 2, 2011
Economy

Federal Agency Sues Banks Over Mortgage Securities

The Federal Housing Finance Agency sued several major banks over risky mortgage securities they sold. Melissa Block talks to NPR's Jim Zarroli for more.

4:31pm

Fri September 2, 2011
Monkey See

Hugh Laurie Sings The Blues

Hugh Laurie, seen here playing Dr. Gregory House on House, has a new project.
Ray Mickshaw Fox

Fans of Hugh Laurie on House -- a show for which he's been nominated for six Emmys — know that grumpy Dr. House doesn't get at all of Laurie's talents. He was previously best known for comedy, particularly what he did with Stephen Fry on shows like Jeeves And Wooster. But on House, while he does plenty of dark comedy, he also plays heavy drama.

And now he's released an album of New Orleans and Delta blues. (He knows its' a little counterintuitive. But that's okay.)

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4:29pm

Fri September 2, 2011
Planet Money

Switzerland: Too Strong For Its Own Good

Arnd Wiegmann Reuters

The world economy is so messed up right now that even healthy countries are facing a strange kind of crisis: They've become too popular with investors.

Take Switzerland. Its economy is in great shape. Low debt, low unemployment. And, perhaps most importantly, the country doesn't use the euro.

So it's not surprising that the Swiss Franc has become a popular safe haven among investors who are worried about the future of the euro and the U.S. dollar.

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1:23pm

Fri September 2, 2011
Music Interviews

Hugh Laurie's New Orleans Romp, By Way Of Oxford

Hugh Laurie worked with producer Joe Henry, Allen Toussaint, Irma Thomas and Dr. John on his debut album, Let Them Talk.
Michael Wilson

Fans of the TV medical drama House know actor Hugh Laurie as the sardonic, limping, Vicodin-popping title character, Dr. Gregory House. From time to time, Dr. House will noodle at the piano, and that's no act: Laurie started playing piano as a child in England. Now, on his debut album Let Them Talk, he's romping through the music he loves best: New Orleans and Delta blues.

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6:23pm

Thu September 1, 2011
Science

For Protesters, Keystone Pipeline Is Line In Tar Sand

Originally published on Thu September 1, 2011 9:39 pm

U.S. Park Police officers arrest demonstrators in front of the While House on Thursday. They were protesting against a proposed 1,700-mile-long pipeline that would carry oil from the tar sands in Alberta, Canada, to the U.S. Gulf Coast.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Dozens of environmental activists showed up in front of the White House Thursday to get arrested in a peaceful protest against a proposed oil pipeline that would cut across the American Midwest.

Organizers said that over the past 10 days, about 800 people have been handcuffed and bused off to a police station in this ongoing action.

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5:19pm

Thu September 1, 2011
Science

Human Brain Responds To Animals, Cute Or Creepy

The brain "seems to be specialized in alerting us to things that are emotionally important to us — either positive or because they're scary," a scientist says.
iStockphoto.com

Animals have a special place in the human heart. Now, researchers are reporting that creatures great and small also have a special place in our heads.

A team led by researchers at Caltech has found individual brain cells that respond when a person sees an animal, but not when that person sees another person, a place, or an object.

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4:00pm

Thu September 1, 2011
The Record

Reggae Loves Country: A 50-Year Romance

Beres Hammond onstage at Reggae Sunsplash in August of 1993. On Reggae Goes Country he sings "He Stopped Loving Her Today," most famously recorded by George Jones.
David Corio Redferns

VP Records is the largest distributor of reggae music, and Warner Music Nashville is a preeminent country label. What could the two have in common? This month, a joint album — Reggae's Gone Country.

Picture this: You're at a massive street dance in Kingston, Jamaica, and the speakers are blaring the latest reggae and dancehall tunes. But the crowd erupts when the DJ drops this one: Kenny Rogers' "The Gambler."

Surprised? Don't be, says veteran Jamaican reggae singer Freddie McGregor. He, like so many West Indians, is a huge country music fan. His favorite singer?

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4:00pm

Wed August 31, 2011
The Record

Why Gibson Guitar Was Raided By The Justice Department

Federal Investigators look through the workshop at the Gibson Guitar factory during a raid on the facility in Memphis on August 24th.
Jim Weber The Commercial Appeal/ZUMAPRESS.com

Last week federal marshals raided the Gibson Guitar Corporation in Tennessee. It wasn't the first time. The government appears to be preparing to charge the famous builder of instruments with trafficking in illegally obtained wood. It's a rare collision of music and environmental regulation.

In the hottest part of an August Tennessee day last Thursday, Gibson Guitar CEO Henry Juszkiewicz stood out in the full sun for 30 minutes and vented to the press about the events of the day before.

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3:00pm

Wed August 31, 2011
NPR Story

Justice Department Sues AT&T

AT&T's plan to take over T-Mobile is in trouble. The Justice Department filed suit Wednesday to block the $39 billion deal. Justice officials said combining the second and fourth largest U.S. cell phone companies would hurt competition — and likely keep prices higher than they would otherwise be.

3:00pm

Wed August 31, 2011
NPR Story

Paraphrase At MLK Memorial Draws Criticism

Melissa Block talks to Ed Jackson, Jr., the executive architect of the Martin Luther King memorial. They discuss the Martin Luther King "Drum Major" line that is etched on the north face of the monument. The line, taken from a February 1968 speech by King, was paraphrased. And one of the monument's high-profile consultants, poet Maya Angelou, told the Washington Post the inscription is misleading and makes the civil rights leader seem arrogant.

3:30pm

Tue August 30, 2011
The Record

Bluesman Honeyboy Edwards Has Died

David "Honeyboy" Edwards in an undated photo.
Dave Peabody Redferns

David "Honeyboy" Edwards, considered to be the last of a generation of musicians who brought music from the rural Mississippi Delta to the rest of America, died at his home in Chicago early Monday morning. He was 96 years old.

Honeyboy Edwards was born in 1915. He grew up in segregated Mississippi during Jim Crow. Though his dad was a share-cropper, the young Edwards did not work in the fields.

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3:00pm

Tue August 30, 2011
Politics

Obama Addresses American Legion

President Obama traveled to Minneapolis today and addressed the annual national conference of the American Legion. Robert Siegel talks to NPR's Mara Liasson for more.

3:00pm

Tue August 30, 2011
NPR Story

Abandoned: International Space Station?

Originally published on Tue August 30, 2011 6:11 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, host: I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK: I'm Melissa Block, and this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

SIEGEL: For nearly 11 years, we humans have had an uninterrupted presence on the International Space Station and that streak could be coming to an end. Last week, an unmanned Russian rocket loaded with supplies for the Space Station came crashing back to Earth. And Russia has now delayed future launches, pending an investigation of what went wrong.

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3:00pm

Tue August 30, 2011
NPR Story

Vermont Reels In Irene's Wake

Roads and bridges are out in Wilmington, Vt., in the wake of Hurricane Irene. Melissa Block talks with Fred Ventresco, town manager of Wilmington, for more.

3:00pm

Tue August 30, 2011
NPR Story

Top Justice Department Officials Resign

Two top Justice Department officials resign on the same day as Republicans in Congress vow not to let up on their oversight of a failed law enforcement operation known as Fast and Furious. Robert Siegel talks to NPR's Carrie Johnson for more.

3:00pm

Tue August 30, 2011
NPR Story

Sudan Accused Of Bombing Civilians In Kordofan

Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch say Sudanese planes have been terrorizing civilians in the Nuba mountains region of Southern Kordofan. Researchers from the two human rights groups managed to sneak into the region recently to document what they say have been ongoing and indiscriminate air strikes in the region. Sudan claims that the newly independent country of South Sudan is fomenting unrest in Kordofan. Human Rights groups say there is an armed conflict in the region, but that doesn't excuse attacks on civilians.

2:17pm

Tue August 30, 2011
Music Interviews

J.D. Souther: A 'Natural History' Of Songwriting

J.D. Souther, who long worked with The Eagles, says there are no rules to crafting a great song.
Jeremy Cowart

As part of the thriving 1970s country-rock scene in Southern California, J.D. Souther collaborated on many of The Eagles' hits, including "New Kid in Town." Souther has jazz in his background — his father was a big-band crooner — and his new album, titled A Natural History, does have a stripped-down jazz feel. Souther wrote all of these songs, many of which became classics for other artists. Now he's gone back and reclaimed them.

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