All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-7pm and Weekends 5-6PM
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Jonese Franklin

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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3:00pm

Thu October 6, 2011
Media

Nazaryan: Americans Don't Deserve Literature Nobel

Guy Raz, talks with Alexander Nazaryan about his rant in Salon.com, excoriating the American literary world. He explains that Americans don't deserve a Nobel Prize because their work is too interior. Nazaryan is on the editorial board of The New York Daily News.

2:13pm

Thu October 6, 2011
Music Interviews

Radiohead: Everything In Its Right Place

Thom Yorke at Radiohead's Sept. 28 concert at Roseland Ballroom in New York.

Kevin Mazur WireImage

Radiohead's first hit, "Creep," was everywhere in 1993. The band could have reacted as many other modern-rock acts did in the '90s: by repeating the same old sound, album after album, before fading into the background. Instead, the group made each record a reinvention, from the spare and haunting Kid A to In Rainbows, which sounded, well, sexy. It's all helped make Radiohead one of the most inventive and important bands in the world.

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7:50pm

Wed October 5, 2011
Election 2012

Palin Says She Won't Run For President

Originally published on Wed October 5, 2011 9:24 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Sarah Palin says she will not run for the 2012 GOP nomination for president. The former vice presidential nominee made the announcement on the syndicated Mark Levin radio show. For more, I'm joined by NPR's Don Gonyea. And, Don, what reasons did Palin give?

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3:26pm

Wed October 5, 2011
Monkey See

Do Rising Costs Have 'The Simpsons' On The Ropes?

The Simpsons is confronted with pressures that may require the voice cast to accept large pay cuts or face the possibility that the show won't continue at all.

FOX

The future of the The Simpsons hangs in the balance as negotiations continue between 20th Century Fox Television, which makes the animated series, and the actors who supply the characters voices. How does a TV classic that's been on the air a record 23 seasons find itself at death's door?

Well, the cartoon Simpsons aren't rich, but the real people who bring them to life sure are. Six main actors are responsible for everyone from Homer to Lisa to bartender Moe, and you won't believe how much each makes to do voices for these characters. Try $8 million a season.

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7:00am

Wed October 5, 2011
You Must Read This

Drunk On Words: A Literary Escape From Adolescence

Originally published on Wed October 12, 2011 6:27 pm

Remember reading, as a child, and feeling the fine mesh of words catch you up so completely that you became enjoyably muddled about which was the real world and which the world of the book? For me, it was as though I gulped down the language of the story and grew fat with its cadences — they rang in my ears, colored my vision and pulsed in my throat.

As I got older, I lost some of that easy susceptibility. What had once been a permeable membrane between fiction and life solidified.

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5:51pm

Tue October 4, 2011
Music

Authentic Egyptian Music Is From The Streets

An Egyptian man sits watching as others take part in a sit-in at Tahrir Square demanding further reforms in Cairo, on July 27, 2011, months after the country's revolution which brought down the government.

Khaled Desouki AFP/Getty Images

This summer I spent a month in Egypt doing research for the public radio program Afropop Worldwide. In October, Afropop will begin airing a series of programs looking at Egypt — past and present — through the eyes of musicians. In one episode Egyptians are asked to imagine how the revolution will affect their popular music?

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4:12pm

Tue October 4, 2011
Monkey See

DVD Picks: 'The Honeymooners'

Originally published on Tue October 4, 2011 6:52 pm

MPI Home Video

Time for our movie critic Bob Mondello to suggest something for home-viewing. Today, he's exploring a 15-disk collection of classic TV comedy that nobody's seen for a while: The Honeymooners: The Lost Episodes.

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3:52pm

Tue October 4, 2011
Opinion

Drafting My Fantasy Picks & Tackling Nobel Trends

The statue of Alfred Nobel resides at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. The 2011 Nobel Prize for Medicine, awarded by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, opened a week of Nobel honors.

Jonathan Nackstrand AFP/Getty Images

Commentator Dennis O'Toole is a writer and improv performer from Chicago.

Today, Saul Perlmutter, Brian Schmidt and Adam G. Riess won the Nobel Prize in Physics for discovering that expansion in the universe is speeding up. That's great news for me, since I had Riess and Perlmutter in my fantasy league.

Honestly, I could have gotten Schmidt too, but I drafted Nathan Seiberg, mainly because he's worked with both supersymmetric gauge theories and with discrete light-cone quantization. That was a hedge.

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4:28pm

Mon October 3, 2011
Monkey See

Comedian Samantha Bee Makes A Parenting Meal Of 'Eating Over The Sink'

Originally published on Tue October 4, 2011 11:09 am

Comedian Samantha Bee, seen here in April 2011, is writing about parenting at her new blog.

Jason Kempin Getty Images

A discussion on today's All Things Considered between host Guy Raz and comedian Samantha Bee begins with his noting that she has reduced parenting to the words "vomit" and "urine."

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2:57pm

Mon October 3, 2011
Music Reviews

Woody Guthrie's 'Note Of Hope' From Beyond The Grave

Woody Guthrie is the subject of a new tribute album, Note of Hope.

Robin Carson Courtesy of the Woody Guthrie Archives

When Woody Guthrie died in 1967, he left behind an enormous cache of unpublished lyrics and prose, which has resulted in an exceptionally rich posthumous career. Bob Dylan, who should know, has written of Guthrie: "He was so poetic and tough and rhythmic. There was so much intensity, and his voice was like a stiletto." Though I probably shouldn't admit it, I rarely listen to Woody Guthrie for pleasure.

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6:34pm

Sun October 2, 2011
NPR Story

NPR Names New CEO

NPR has named a new president and chief executive officer: Gary Knell, president and CEO of Sesame Workshop, the company that produces Sesame Street.

3:36pm

Sun October 2, 2011
Author Interviews

The Old Man And The Boat: Hemingway On The Pilar

Originally published on Sun October 2, 2011 6:37 pm

Ernest Hemingway (left) and his guide Carlos Gutierrez navigate Hemingway's boat, Pilar, in 1934.
Ernest Hemingway Photograph Collection, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum

In 1934, Ernest Hemingway was the reigning king of American letters. Just back from safari in Africa, where he'd shot rhinos and giant kudu, he seemed to be on top of the world.

The first thing he did after returning from safari was head to the Wheeler shipyard in Brooklyn, N.Y., and buy a 38-foot fishing boat he named Pilar.

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3:00pm

Sun October 2, 2011
Books

Three-Minute Fiction

The Three-Minute Fiction contest is over, but the fun is just beginning. We received 3,400 stories in Round 7 and our readers from Iowa Writer's Workshop and New York University are hard at work trying to get to them of all. NPR's Lynn Neary and Bob Mondello bring two of these stories to life: "Misshapen" by Aaron Maltz and "The Young and the Old" by Alex Swiatek.

2:00pm

Sun October 2, 2011
Television

TV's Fixation With 'The New Breed' Of '60s Women

The fall television season is in high gear, and there seems to be a barrage of tight skirts, panty-hosed legs and perfectly made-up faces making their way from the 1960s to the small screen.

On ABC is Pan Am, a show about airline stewardesses. There's also NBC's The Playboy Club, which following the stories of fictional bunnies in Hugh Hefner's nightclub. The networks are hoping to get on the nostalgia bandwagon after the success of Mad Men, AMC's period drama.

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1:15pm

Sun October 2, 2011
Science

When Scientists Fail, It's Time To Call In The Gamers

Proteins are incredibly complex, yet tiny — so tiny that conventional imaging techniques often can't capture them.
istockphoto.com

Researchers at the University of Washington were stumped. They were looking at a protein that causes AIDS in rhesus monkeys, but after 14 years of study, no one was able to figure out the protein's exact structure.

Researcher Firas Khatib tells Rachel Martin, host of weekends on All Things Considered, that even the most advanced imaging techniques couldn't capture this little particle.

"The reason that the problem is so hard is that proteins are so small you can't see them with a microscope," he says.

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9:22am

Sun October 2, 2011
Music Lists

World Music With A Latin Flavor

The Congolese street band Staff Benda Billi were discovered playing outside a zoo by a group of French filmmakers.
Courtesy of the artist

As he often does during weekends on All Things Considered, Betto Arcos visits the show this week to talk about some of the best new sounds he's been spinning on Global Village, his world music program on KPFK in Los Angeles. His picks this time around include a flamenco-jazz hybrid from Spain, joropo from Colombia, canchona from Washington, D.C. (by way of El Salvador), and a Cuban-inflected dance number from the Democratic Republic of Congo.

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3:00pm

Sat October 1, 2011
NPR Story

Week In News: Chris Christie For President? Still No

Originally published on Sat October 1, 2011 6:33 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, Host:

We're back with ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

(SOUNDBITE OF MONTAGE)

CHRIS CHRISTIE:

I'm 100 percent certain I'm not going to run. I don't want to run. I don't feel like I'm ready to run. First, you have to have in your heart, you got to want it more than anything else. More than anything else. I don't want it that badly.

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12:31pm

Sat October 1, 2011
Author Interviews

Zen And 'The Art of Fielding': Baseball As Life

iStockphoto

Chad Harbach's debut novel, The Art Of Fielding, is about baseball in the same way Moby-Dick is about whaling. Or in the same way Friday Night Lights is about football.

Which is to say, it is — and it isn't.

Harbach's protagonist, Henry Skrimshander, is a prodigal shortstop at a small, midwestern liberal arts college called Westish University. Henry is destined for the big leagues, until a debilitating mental slump lands him on the bench.

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4:58pm

Fri September 30, 2011
Music Interviews

Hank Williams' Unfinished Thoughts, Finished

The Lost Notebooks of Hank Williams puts unreleased works by the country legend in the hands of a dozen contemporary songwriters.
Courtesy of the artist

"When Hank Williams died, he left behind a scuffed, embroidered brown leather briefcase. Like its owner, the briefcase appeared weathered beyond its years, yet it retained a dignified bearing that abuse couldn't erase."

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4:26pm

Fri September 30, 2011
Books

'The Cat's Table': A Romp Through Mystery And Memories

Originally published on Tue June 19, 2012 3:48 pm

In writer Michael Ondaatje's mind, the "cat's table" is where the undesirables sit in a boat's dining room. It's for the hecklers, the lowly ones and the ones farthest away from power. And it's also where you'll find the narrator of Ondaatje's new novel, Michael, an 11-year-old who's on a 21-day voyage from Sri Lanka to London all on his own.

He and his companions — two other boys who are travelling alone — live by only one rule: to every day do at least one thing that is forbidden.

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4:07pm

Fri September 30, 2011
Opinion

For Grown-Ups, Missing Those Back-To-School Blues

While adults wax poetic about the merits of education, kids know the agony of being stuck in a classroom.
istockphoto.com

Ben Dolnick is a writer based in Brooklyn.

Lately my neighborhood has been colonized by a species that exists only for a few weeks each fall: excited students. They're brimming with gossip about each other and opinions about subjects they hadn't heard of two months ago. They seem thrilled, even at 8 in the morning.

When I was their age, I loathed school, even in September. It was dull, and worse — it was forced upon me. I longed for escape like a prisoner crossing off days on his cell wall.

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3:30pm

Fri September 30, 2011
Art & Design

Pop Art Master Oldenburg Unveils Another Big Idea

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:22 am

Tom Crane Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

Pop art master Claes Oldenburg will officially unveil his latest sculpture outside the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts on Saturday. Oldenburg is known for taking everyday objects and blowing them up to impossible sizes. At first, his giant clothespins and spoons made him a target for ridicule. But now you can find examples of Oldenburg's work all over the world, from Cologne to Cleveland. And they've been embraced — for the most part.

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3:00pm

Fri September 30, 2011
NPR Story

Commentator Jo Carson Dies At 64

Michele Norris and Melissa Block remember former All Things Considered commentator Jo Carson who died earlier this month in the place where she was born — John City, Tenn. She was 64. She was a playwright, fiction author, and children's' book author.

3:32pm

Thu September 29, 2011
Music Reviews

Mates Of State: Reaching Surprising New 'Mountaintops'

Mates of State's newest album is Mountaintops.
Glynis Selina Arban

Mates of State's members are literally mates: Kori Gardner and Jason Hammel have been a duo since 1996, married since 2001, and parents on tour since 2004. Their basic concept is two strong voices, Gardner's slightly predominant, over her keyboards and Hammel's drums. Over the years, the band has expanded its instrumental range and brought in guests for sonic color. But nothing in the pair's catalog anticipated "Palomino," the opening track from the new Mountaintops.

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3:00pm

Thu September 29, 2011
NPR Story

Proposed Alaska Mine Faces Fierce Opposition

In Alaska's picturesque Bristol Bay region, developers are looking to build an enormous copper and gold mine. They promise the effort will be carried out in an environmentally responsible way — and provide area jobs. But fisherman, conservationists and native groups have joined efforts to thwart the mine, fearing it will pollute area fish and wildlife. Melissa Block talks about the battle for Bristol Bay with reporter Daysha Eaton of member station KDLG in Dillingham, Alaska.

1:15pm

Thu September 29, 2011
The Record

Sylvia Robinson, Who Helped Make 'Rapper's Delight,' Has Died

Originally published on Thu September 29, 2011 6:15 pm

A press photo of Sylvia Robinson from around 1992.
Al Pereira Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

6:10pm

Wed September 28, 2011
Health

Health Officials: Listeria Outbreak Linked To 13 Deaths

A listeria outbreak linked to cantaloupes from Colorado has infected 72 people in the United States and killed 13, U.S. health officials said on Tuesday. The food-borne outbreak is the deadliest in the United States in more than a decade, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

3:00pm

Wed September 28, 2011
Around the Nation

Texas Authorities Find Massive Shark Kill

This past weekend, wildlife officials in Texas came across a huge illegal fishing operation. They found about 3,000 dead sharks, tangled in miles of nets off the coast. Michele Norris talks with Sergeant James Dunks with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department who found the sharks.

3:00pm

Wed September 28, 2011
World

Saudi Woman Sentenced To Lashings After Violating Driving Ban

A group of activists in Saudi Arabia has launched a campaign to overturn a court ruling against a woman who defied the kingdom's ban on driving by women. The woman was sentenced to 10 lashes with a whip after she defied the ban in her home city on the Red Sea Coast. Melissa Block talks with NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson for the details.

3:00pm

Wed September 28, 2011
Education

Obama Delivers Back-To-School Speech

President Obama delivered his annual back-to-school speech at Benjamin Banneker High School, one of Washington, D.C.'s top performing schools.

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